First Class Service to Europe - 1929

Front Cover, Holland America Line First Class Service to Europe Brochure, 1929.

Front Cover, Holland America Line First Class Service to Europe Brochure, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ecb045687

 

A Transatlantic Tradition of Six Decades by the Holland America Line

THE Holland-America Line has acquired a reputation of its own—a reputation for first-class service that is not excelled on the Seven Seas.

The Holland-America Line was founded nearly six decades ago with the tradition of hundreds of years of mastery of the seas and experience in shipbuilding behind it—with records, worthwhile national records to uphold — records established by Hendrick Hudson and the many other sons of Holland who have fared forth on the seas since time immemorial.

Indeed it has a background to be proud of. But it is not tradition alone that makes the Line what it is today. We are living in the present — not in the past. You, who are planning a trip abroad, are naturally looking at conditions as they now exist.

And for a voyage across the ocean, there are certain things that you rightfully demand and to which you are justly entitled. And they are — Security — Service — Cuisine — Comfort — Cleanliness.

You can count upon all of them if you travel by the Holland-America Line. And on the following pages, you will find that the things you demand and will receive are in no way special or unusual services but simply a part of the regular, everyday routine of the company.

So we will take them up in regular order, confident that you will find some reasons herein why so many transatlantic travelers find something to cherish in Holland-America Line First Class service and why we believe you should.

Security

THE vessels of the Holland-America Line are built to out-wit the sea in all its moods and weather— are equipped with every known device of safety, and handled by commanders, officers, and crews of the highest merit— while below the passenger decks, thousands of tons of cargo are carried that add materially to solidity and a feeling of constant ease at sea.

Regardless of the weather, these mighty monarchs of the deep ride with a superb steadiness that makes for comfort and security.

Ranging in tonnage from 5,430 tons gross register and 25,500 tons displacement of the Volendam and Veendam to 30,000 tons gross register and 40,000 tons displacement of the Statendam— "The Queen of the Spotless" Fleet"—one can at all times have a justified feeling of security, the first of the cardinal principles that are needed if one contemplates an ocean voyage.

The new Statendam takes just a week to bridge the Atlantic— the other steamers only a day longer.

Service

SERVICE on these vessels means all that the dictionary definition im- plies—but plus a distinctive friendliness in serving typical of the sons and daughters of Holland who supply it. "Care, worry, and responsibility vanished when I went aboard," was the comment of a recent voyager. He spoke for himself, but his remark can be appropriately regarded as the opinion of all travelers on Holland-America Line vessels.

A journey on the Holland-America Line ship is a peaceful trip. One naturally relaxes. There is nothing but carefree enjoyment ahead. The dining room, deck, room steward, or stewardess relieve one of every detail of existence from when the gangplank is crossed.

For on these ships, there are servants such as you have at home or, perhaps, in these days, the kind of servants you wish you had. Perfect service is a jewel beyond price, but those who travel by the steamers of the Holland-America Line enjoy it, and thousands gladly testify to the truthfulness of this statement.

If you want real service, friendly, capable, yet unobtrusive service, you will find it on the vessels of the Holland-America Line.

Cuisine

TWO things are necessary for a perfect meal — the best provisions and the most experienced cooks. It takes both to supply a menu, but it requires a careful combination and cooperation to "fill the bill" satisfactorily.

Because it thoroughly realizes the necessity of utilizing nothing but the best in materials and human skill, the Holland-America Line is famous for its cuisine. Its provisions— from the rarest game to the prosaic potato—are chosen from the very best supplies, while its chefs are masters of the culinary art. Here is a combination that cannot be beaten. Eating your way across the Atlantic under these auspices is something you will never regret.

All Holland-America Line vessels serve an entirely a la carte menu for even the most elaborate meals without extra charge. These menus make a selection of the daintiest foodstuffs, while on the wine list, one finds names of the finest vineyards of Europe.

Each meal on a Holland-America Liner is a landmark (perhaps the word should be seamark) in one's epicurean career. We may differ on the word, but we will not differ as to the excellence and tastiness of the food.

Comfort

When you travel on one of these liners, you may justly imagine you are the honored guest in a fine Dutch home that has gone to sea.

It is a home that is not only dignified but cheerful and charming. More than that, it is the last word in COMFORT, a vital necessity in a voyage.

There is no stiffness—no formality. One feels at home from the moment of embarkation. The officers and crew are friendly, not a forced friendliness, but one that comes naturally to them —and it is a spirit that grows stronger each successive voyage.

The officials of the company are careful in the selection of their subordinates. Holland-America Line officers and men must be able to fill the positions in which they are placed, of course, but further than that, it is required that they fit naturally into what might be called the "home life" of these liners. The human spirit of the Line must be, and is, upheld at all costs.

No wonder, therefore, that so many passengers on Holland-America Line vessels come down the gangplank at the end of the voyage with a feeling of genuine regret at the necessity of parting from their fellow guests and the officers and crew of what they have grown to regard as their "home at sea."

Cleanliness

Nestling behind the dykes of Holland are thousands of Dutch homes, the shining cleanliness of which has become a worldwide legend.

This Inherent Dutch sense of immaculate cleanliness is paramount at sea, on the Holland- America Line vessels. Anyone who has ever visited a home In Holland has seen floors that shine, pots that glisten, old wood that gleams, and spotless windows through which one can view the brilliant countryside of the old world. This cleanliness essential to Dutch life is carried to the sea on Holland-America Line vessels.

Some day, while you are planning your next transatlantic trip, come to the Holland-Amerlca Line docks. Come unannounced and let any of the countless Holland-Amerlca Line attendants take you through any vessel in the harbor. See for yourself the spotless rooms which will be your home during your time at sea — you'll then truly appreciate the meaning of Dutch cleanliness.

SS Statendam

The New SS Statendam, 30,000 Tons Register, 40,000 Tons Displacement.

The New SS Statendam, 30,000 Tons Register, 40,000 Tons Displacement. Painting by Fred J. Hoertz. GGA Image ID # 1ec5fe3aca

 

First Class Palm Court on the SS Statendam.

First Class Palm Court on the SS Statendam. GGA Image ID # 1ec6ac4ad3

This Large room, high on the boat deck with full-length glass windows on three sides, is one of the many appealing public rooms on the New SS Statendam.

 

First Class Dining Room on the SS Statendam.

First Class Dining Room on the SS Statendam. GGA Image ID # 1ec6d8340e

 

A Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the Statendam.

A Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the Statendam. GGA Image ID # 1ec6fb73d1

 

Another Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the SS Statendam.

Another Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the SS Statendam. GGA Image ID # 1ec71eab06

 

First Class Enclosed Promenade on the SS Statendam.

First Class Enclosed Promenade on the SS Statendam. GGA Image ID # 1ec72625d4

 

First Class Children's Playroom on the SS Statendam.

First Class Children's Playroom on the SS Statendam. GGA Image ID # 1ec7d47c5f

 

A Minimum Rate First Class Stateroom on the SS Statendam.

A Minimum Rate First Class Stateroom on the SS Statendam. GGA Image ID # 1ec83c8112

 

The SS Rotterdam, 24,170 Tons Register, 37,190 Tons Displacement.

The SS Rotterdam, 24,170 Tons Register, 37,190 Tons Displacement. Painting by Fred J.Hoertz. GGA Image ID # 1ec8b6927d

The Rotterdam — entirely reconditioned from stem to stern — has beds and running hot and cold water in all her rooms. A delightful tile swimming pool and modern gymnasium are among her many other new niceties and improvements.

 

View of the Palm Court on the SS Rotterdam.

View of the Palm Court on the SS Rotterdam. GGA Image ID # 1ec8f8dba8

 

 

The First Class Library on the SS Rotterdam.

The First Class Library on the SS Rotterdam. GGA Image ID # 1ec90239eb

 

Exquisite First-Class Room on "A" Deck on the SS Rotterdam.

Exquisite First-Class Room on "A" Deck on the SS Rotterdam. GGA Image ID # 1ec931b30e

 

Sitting Room in a First Class Suite on the SS Rotterdam.

Sitting Room in a First Class Suite on the SS Rotterdam. GGA Image ID # 1ec93df0f1

 

The SS Nieuw Amsterdam, 17,250 Tons Register, 31,000 Tons Displacement.

The SS Nieuw Amsterdam, 17,250 Tons Register, 31,000 Tons Displacement. Painting by Fred J. Hoertz. GGA Image ID # 1ec9508854

 

The Japanese Tea Room in First Class on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam.

The Japanese Tea Room in First Class on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam. GGA Image ID # 1ec984daf3

 

First Class Cabin Stateroom on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam.

First Class Cabin Stateroom on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam. GGA Image ID # 1ec98e1a01

 

First Class Dining Room on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam.

First Class Dining Room on the SS Nieuw Amsterdam. GGA Image ID # 1eca0272c6

 

The SS Veendam, 15,450 Tons Register, 25,620 Tons Displacement.

The SS Veendam, 15,450 Tons Register, 25,620 Tons Displacement. Painting by Fred J. Hoertz. GGA Image ID # 1eca49b7b0

 

The SS Volendam, Sister-Ship of the SS Veendam. 15,430 Tons Register, 25,620 Tons Displacement.

The SS Volendam, Sister-Ship of the SS Veendam. 15,430 Tons Register, 25,620 Tons Displacement. Painting by Fred J. Hoertz. GGA Image ID # 1ecae28911

 

First Class Salon on the SS Volendam and SS Veendam.

First Class Salon on the SS Volendam and SS Veendam. GGA Image ID # 1eca945ee4

 

First Class Outside Room with a Bath on the SS Volendam and SS Veendam.

First Class Outside Room with a Bath on the SS Volendam and SS Veendam. GGA Image ID # 1eca9f40af

 

First Class Smoking Room on the SS Volendam and SS Veendam.

First Class Smoking Room on the SS Volendam and SS Veendam. GGA Image ID # 1ecac57ea4

 

Deck Sports For Recreation and Health

Passengers Play Deck Tennis on a Holland-America Liner.

Passengers Play Deck Tennis on a Holland-America Liner. GGA Image ID # 1ecacd0d79

Deck tennis is always a favorite sport, but there are a hundred other diversions to choose from on Holland-America Liners.

NEW YORK — DEPARTURE AND RETURN

THE Holland-America Line has made special arrangements by which a de luxe motor coach service is placed at the disposal of its passengers, connecting the Holland-America Line Piers via the Holland Tunnel with the centrally located New York Hotels Commodore and McAlpin . . . the former adjoining the Grand Central Terminal and the latter near the Pennsylvania Station.

Baggage-checking facilities are extended to Holland-America Line passengers at both Hotels. On incoming steamers, Motor Coaches will be waiting at the Pier to carry passengers to the New York City terminal points when they have completed customs formalities—the charge for this service, including hand baggage, is one dollar each way.

EUROPEAN ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE

ALL East-bound Holland-America Line Steamers call first at Plymouth, England, in the heart of Cornwall and Devon . . . and connect with special trains to London . . . then at Boulogne-Sur-Mer in France almost at the gates of Paris (2 3/4 hours by special boat train) . . . and finally at Rotterdam, Holland ... the focal point for Central Europe . . . All West-bound steamers leave from Rotterdam, calling at Boulogne-Sur-Mer and, in England, at Southampton (2 hours from London).

AUTOMOBILES

AUTOS, crated or uncrated, are accepted for shipment as excess baggage on the same steamer on which the owner sails. Reservations should be made sufficiently in advance (preferably at the time of booking), and cars delivered to the pier the day before sailing. Return space may be reserved before the passenger leaves the United States. European driver's licenses, International Customs Pass, number plates, etc., can be obtained through any office or authorized agent of the Holland-America Line.

The Final Word

IF, through the medium of the pictures in this booklet, you have been transported from the monotony of city life to the restful waters that link the Old World with the New, the purpose of this booklet is achieved.

We have endeavored to show you that the Holland-America Line will do everything possible to make your voyage pleasant and comfortable. Some people might say our responsibility ends there—but we declare it does not.

We like you to understand that Holland-America service does not cease when you disembark. On land and at sea, we are at your command, and you will always find us ready and willing to respond to any call you make.

Many of our guests at sea are visiting Europe for the first time. Amid strange surroundings, they may need an experienced friend to turn to for aid and information.

We desire to be that friend. On the following page (Omitted), you will find a list of our offices in America and Europe where you will find alert, responsible Holland-America Line representatives who want to serve you. Bring them your travel problems and let them solve them. It will be a pleasure to us — and, we believe, a genuine practical service to you. That is our sole reason for making the suggestion.

 

 

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