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RMS Cymric Passenger Lists 1906-1910

The Immense New S.S. Cyrmric, One of the largest freight and passenger steamers afloat. 12,552 tons, 600 feet in length. Now in service. Low First Cabin Rates. $50 and up, winter season (1900).

Cymric (1898) White Star Line.

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 13,096. Dimensions: 585' x 64' (599' o.l.). Twin-screw, 15 knots. Quadruple expansion engines. Four masts and one funnel. Launched in October 1897. Maiden voyage: Liverpool-New York, April 29, 1898. Torpedoed and sunk 140 miles from Foreland, May 8, 1916, with the loss of five lives.

All Digitized Passenger Lists For the RMS Cymric Available at the GG Archives. Listing Includes Date Voyage Began, Steamship Line, Vessel, Passenger Class and Route.

Passenger Manifest, White Star Line RMS Cymric, 1906, Liverpool to Boston

1906-03-08 RMS Cymric Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: White Star Line
  • Class of Passengers: First Class
  • Date of Departure: 8 March 1906
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston via Queenstown (Cobh)
  • Commander: Captain F. E. Beadnell
Passenger Manifest, White Star Line RMS Cymric, September 1906, Liverpool to Boston

1906-09-07 RMS Cymric Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: White Star Line
  • Class of Passengers: First Class
  • Date of Departure: 7 September 1906
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston via Queenstown (Cobh)
  • Commander: Captain C. A. Bartlett
Passenger Manifest, RMS Cymric, White Star Line, July 1910, Liverpool to Boston

1910-07-26 RMS Cymric Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: White Star Line
  • Class of Passengers: First Class
  • Date of Departure: 26 July 1910
  • Route: Liverpool to Boston via Queenstown (Cobh)
  • Commander: Captain F. B. Howarth

Passenger Lists contained in the GG Archives collection represent the souvenir list provided to the passengers of each cabin class (and other classes). Many of these souvenir passenger lists have disappeared over the years. Our collection contains a sampling of what was originally produced and printed by the steamship lines.

Steamship Cymric of the White Star Line

This powerful twin screw steamer is prominent in the Boston - Queenstown Liverpool Service of the White Star Line. Of 13,096 tons burden, her length, 600 feet, and great beam, 64 feet, entitle the Cymric to the consideration of the intending voyager who is thereby assured of a steady trip, practically free from the dread mal-de-mer.

The Cymric is equipped mainly to cater to first- and third-class passengers. No provision is being made for passengers in second class on this vessel. Under this arrangement, the promenade spaces for both classes are correspondingly large, and the cabins for passengers will be found very attractive and equipped with the most comfortable style of berths.

The first-class passengers have apportioned to them a vast promenade deck space, an especially prominent feature of the Cymric; and, with the care and courtesy shown passengers (as on all other White Star Line ships), no one who has sailed on this steamer can speak but in her praise.

The SS Cymric, Modern Cargo Steamer

The "Cymric" is an excellent example of a modern cargo steamer. Her measurement capacity is about 19,400 tons, and her dead-weight capacity is about 12,000 tons, excluding coal. Her cargo space is divided into seven holds, each of which is divided into three compartments: 'tween decks, orlops, and lower hold. Five chambers are fitted as refrigerators, with a total capacity of about 2,200 tons. There are nine hatchways, 15 derricks, 17 steam winches for cargo purposes, and mast-head "spans." The capability of these appliances is illustrated by the fact that she commenced discharging a full cargo at 7 a.m. on Monday, completed her loading of freight and took on board 1,600 tons of coal, and undocked at noon on the following Friday. Loading and unloading were carried on to a great extent concurrently. About 400 to 450 men were employed, and the average rate of discharge was not less than 300 tons (weight) per hour, the corresponding rate of loading being about 250 tons. All the general cargo, apart from bulk grain, etc., was weighed at landing. When it is remembered that there may be 30,000 to 40,000 packages to be dealt with in such a general cargo, these results are evidence of excellent mechanical arrangements and perfect organization.

Bibliography

"Steamship Cymric" in Facts for Travelers: American Line, Atlantic Transport Line, Dominion Line, Leyland Line, Red Star Line, White Star Line, International Mercantil Marine Company, 1898, p. 78.

Sir William H. White, K.C.B., LL.D., D.Sc., F.R.S., "President's Address: The Connection Between Mechanical Engineering and Modern Shipbuilding," Proceedings, 1899, Parts 1-2, p. 172.

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