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SS Merion Passenger Lists 1910-1913

American Line SS Haverford and the SS Merion (Sister Ships).

American Line SS Haverford and the SS Merion (Sister Ships). Facts for Travelers, 1908, p. 18. GGA Image ID # 1d1e052266

Merion (1902) American Line.

Built by John Brown & Co., Clydebank, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 11,612. Dimensions: 531' x 59' (547' o.l.). Twin- screw, 12 knots. Triple expansion engines. Four masts and one funnel. Maiden voyage: Liverpool-Boston, March 8, 1902, as a Dominion liner. Served in Dominion Line for only a brief time, then transferred to American Line. Converted to dummy battleship in World War I. Torpedoed and sunk in Aegean Sea, May 30, 1915. Sister ship: Haverford.

All Digitized Passenger Lists For the SS Merion Available at the GG Archives. Listing Includes Date Voyage Began, Steamship Line, Vessel, Passenger Class and Route.

2 July 1910 SS Merion

1910-07-02 SS Merion Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: Second Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 2 July 1910
  • Route: Philadelphia to Queenstown (Cobh) and Liverpool
  • Commander: Captain J. B. Hill
Passenger Manifest Cover, August 1913 Westbound Voyage - SS Merion

1913-08-27 SS Merion Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 27 August 1913
  • Route: Liverpool to Philadelphia
  • Commander: Captain J. Beattle Hill

Passenger Lists contained in the GG Archives collection represent the souvenir list provided to the passengers of each cabin class (and other classes). Many of these souvenir passenger lists have disappeared over the years. Our collection contains a sampling of what was originally produced and printed by the steamship lines.

The Twin-screw Steamships Haverford and Merion

Messrs . John Brown & Co., Limited, of Clydebank, built the new twin-screw steamships Haverford and Merion. They were designed to carry large cargoes yet equipped with such powerful boiler and engine installation that the ship could maintain sufficient speed to warrant further fitting them with extensive passenger accommodations.

View of the Promenade Deck on the American Line SS Haverford and SS Merion. Facts for Travelers, 1908, p. 20.

View of the Promenade Deck on the American Line SS Haverford and SS Merion. Facts for Travelers, 1908, p. 20. GGA Image ID # 1d1e0b58f5

The weight of the immense cargoes gives them an excellent steadiness at sea, which is additionally insured by the presence of bilge keels.

The principal dimensions of the Haverford and Merion are Length, 547 feet; breadth of beam, 59 feet; gross tonnage, 11,635.

Built of steel on the modern compartment plan, these vessels contain water-tight bulkheads so arranged that any two compartments might be flooded with water without endangering the vessel's safety.

Section of the Library on the SS Haverford and SS Merion. Facts for Travelers, 1908, p. 21.

Section of the Library on the SS Haverford and SS Merion. Facts for Travelers, 1908, p. 21. GGA Image ID # 1d1e167d0f

Powerful engines maintain a speed of about fourteen knots an hour. The extra heavy twin screw shafts are encased in plating to their outer ends. At the same time, the coal bunkers, of immense capacity, are so arranged as to afford perfect protection to the boilers in case the vessel should be used for war purposes.

The bridge -house, extending above the shelter deck, is 150 feet long and covers the entire ship's width within our large and airy staterooms-nine two-berth rooms and thirty-three four-berth rooms— affording cabin accommodations for 150 passengers. Baths and lavatories of solid porcelain are most conveniently located of the most approved types.

The handsomely furnished and pleasingly decorated dining saloon is at the forward end of the deckhouse. It is finished in light oak paneling, and a novel grouping of the side ports arranged in pairs, gives an abundance of light. The appurtenances of the dining room are complete in every detail, and an excellent piano is provided.

The main promenade, which extends the entire width of the vessel, offers a delightful recreative ground, and on this deck of the ship will be found the library, a long, cheerful, and well-ventilated room supplied with many handsomely-bound volumes of the classics and much interesting literature of the In the ladies ' salon, a beautifully appointed apartment, the richly upholstered divans, and easy chairs invite comfort.

Section of the Smoking Room on the American Line SS Haverford and SS Merion.

Section of the Smoking Room on the American Line SS Haverford and SS Merion. Facts for Travelers, 1908, p. 21. GGA Image ID # 1d1e4314e6

During the voyage, the room is constantly in use. The spacious entrance hall adjoins this apartment, and the captain's and officers' quarters are also on this deck.

Another entrance lobby at the end communicates with the library on the port side and a luxurious smoking room on the starboard side — a room most popular with male passengers.

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