SS Albert Ballin Archival Collection

The SS Albert Ballin, 22,000 Gross Tons, Hamburg-American Liner Launched at Hamburg on 16 December 1922.

The SS Albert Ballin, 22,000 Gross Tons, Hamburg-American Liner Launched at Hamburg on 16 December 1922. The Marine Journal, 23 December 1922. GGA Image ID # 1dad7f2f92

 

 

Albert Ballin (1923) Hamburg-American Line

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 20,815. Dimensions: 602' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Steam turbines. Four masts and two funnels. Note: Later re-engined, speed increased to 20 knots. In 1934 was lengthened to 645 feet (21,131 tons) Fate: sunk by mine off Warnemunde in March 1945, and refloated in 1949. Renamed: Hansa (1935), (b) Sovetsky Sojus (1950) Russian. Sister ship: Deutschland. Similar to: Hamburg and New York.

 

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Passenger Lists

 

Third Class Passenger List for the SS Albert Ballin of the Hamburg America Line, Departing 28 January 1926 from Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

1926-01-28 SS Albert Ballin Passenger List

Third Class Passenger List for the SS Albert Ballin of the Hamburg America Line, Departing 28 January 1926 from Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton, Commanded by Captain Wiehr.

 

Passenger Manifest, SS Albert Ballin, Hamburg America Line, August 1926

1926-08-27 SS Albert Ballin Passenger List

Third Class Passenger List for the SS Albert Ballin of the Hamburg America Line, Departing 27 August 1926 from Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton, Commanded by Captain Wiehr.

 

1927-07-06 Passenger Manifest for the SS Albert Ballin

1927-07-06 SS Albert Ballin Passenger List

Third Class Passenger List for the SS Albert Ballin of the Hamburg America Line, Departing 6 July 1927 from New York to Hamburg via Cherbourg and Southampton, Commanded by Captain Paul Wiehr.

 

1931-05-21 Passenger Manifest of SS Albert Ballin

1933-12-20 SS Albert Ballin Passenger List

First, Tourist, and Third Class Passenger List from the SS Albert Ballin of the Hamburg America Line, Departing Wednesday, 20 December 1933 from Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain Fuhr.

 

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Brochures

 

Covers for the 1928 Hamburg American Line Brochure Across the Atlantic - First Class.

1928 - Across the Atlantic in First Class

Outstanding brochure from the Hamburg America Line captures the opulence of first-class transatlantic travel in the late 1920s. Rare interior photographs of public rooms such as the shopping plaza or promenade make this an excellent booklet. Ships Featured: Resolute and Reliance, New York, Hamburg, Albert Ballin, and Deutschland.

 

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Sailing Schedules

 

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 28 January 1926 to 1 June 1926.

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 28 January 1926 to 1 June 1926. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. The listing includes the Name of the Ship's Commander. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e482ac29d

 

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 27 August 1926 to 1 December 1926.

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 27 August 1926 to 1 December 1926. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. The listing includes the Name of the Ship's Commander. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e496a80d7

 

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings to Europe, From 6 July 1927 to 5 January 1928.

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings to Europe, From 6 July 1927 to 5 January 1928. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, New York, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. Listing States Classes of Passengers Carried and the Ship's Commander. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e49d8e1bf

 

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings from Europe, From 7 July 1927 to 31 December 1927.

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings from Europe, From 7 July 1927 to 31 December 1927. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, New York, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. Listing States Classes of Passengers Carried. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e4a28ba52

 

Proposed Sailing List, Hamburg-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 19 April 1929 to 15 August 1929.

Proposed Sailing List, Hamburg-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 19 April 1929 to 15 August 1929. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, Milwaukee, Reliance, Resolute, St. Louis, Thuringia, and Westphalia. SS Hamburg Passenger List, 19 April 1929. GGA Image ID # 1e0152e801

 

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Photographs

 

The SS New York, SS Hamburg, SS Albert Ballin, and SS Deutschland.

The SS New York, SS Hamburg, SS Albert Ballin, and SS Deutschland. 11,500 Tons -- 633 Feet Long -- 79 Feet Wide -- Twin Screw Turbine -- Oil Burning -- 13,000 Horsepower. Across the Atlantic - First Class - Hamburg American Line Brochure, 1928. GGA Image ID # 11c121779b

 

Departure of the SS Albert Ballin from Hamburg on 28 January 1926.

Departure of the SS Albert Ballin from Hamburg on 28 January 1926. Photograph by Hotzel. GGA Image ID # 1e47ab2432

 

Group of Immigrants on the SS Albert Ballin, 16 July 1926.

Group of Immigrants on the SS Albert Ballin, 16 July 1926. Photograph Courtesy of the Gampfer Family. GGA Image ID # 1e4a7b6ae3

 

SS Albert Ballin Third Class Dining Room.

Third Class Dining Room. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e483f6aad

 

SS Albert Ballin Third Class Ladies' Saloon.

Third Class Ladies' Saloon. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e489d0a32

 

SS Albert Ballin third Class Passengers Relaxing on the Promenade Deck.

third Class Passengers Relaxing on the Promenade Deck. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e48f844ce

 

SS Albert Ballin Third Class Bath and Stateroom.

Third Class Bath and Stateroom. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e490de294

 

Chief Steward, Third Class, A. Gross

Chief Steward, Third Class, A. Gross. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 176bd7445b

 

Young Couple Poses Behind the Albert Ballin Life Buoy on the Deck of the SS Albert Ballin, 1927.

Young Couple Poses Behind the Albert Ballin Life Buoy on the Deck of the SS Albert Ballin, 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e4a7c21e6

 

SS Albert Ballin View of the third Class Ladies' Social Hall.

View of the third Class Ladies' Social Hall. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e49750a28

 

SS Albert Ballin Three-Berth Third-Class Stateroom.

Three-Berth Third-Class Stateroom. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e49b094ae

 

SS Albert Ballin Third Class Passengers Playing Sports on Deck.

Third Class Passengers Playing Sports on Deck. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e49ba56c6

 

View Forward from the Port Side of the SS Albert Ballin, 1927.

View Forward from the Port Side of the SS Albert Ballin, 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e4a74b54c

 

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Autographs

 

Centerfold of Autographs Collected During Voyage of the Albert Ballin 6 July 1927.

Centerfold Containing Autographs Collected During Voyage of the Albert Ballin, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 176c6ae08e

 

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Excerpts from Information for Passengers

 

Information for Passengers - 28 January 1926

Attendance. Passengers are requested to bring any complaints to the notice of the chief steward, and, if the complaint is not promptly investigated, to apply to the purser or to the captain.

Valuables or Money. Valuables or money should not be left in the cabin, but be placed in charge of the purser in his safe. No responsibility, however, can be accepted by the Company.

Letters and Telegrams. Mail arriving for Passengers will be distributed in the office of the purser.

For letters and postcards mailed on board German stamps are to be used which may be obtained in the purser's office.

Wireless telegrams are accepted in the wireless station on the boat deck.

Baggage. The baggage room where all large trunks are stored will be open daily at certain hours. Passengers are requested to refer all baggage matters during the voyage to the baggage official on duty. Arrangements between Passengers and stewards or other members of the crew are not binding on the Company. For hand baggage the Company will assume no responsibility.

Physician. For medical attendance in case of sickness contracted on board no charge is made; medicines are also provided free of cost.

Source: SS Albert Ballin Passenger List - 28 January 1926

 

Information for Passengers - 6 July 1927

Attendance. The stewards have strict instructions to attend promptly and courteously to the wants of passengers. Passengers are requested to bring any inattention to the notice of the chief steward, and, if the complaint is not promptly investigated, to apply to the purser.

Valuables and Money. Valuables or money should be placed in charge of the purser for deposit in his safe. It is especially pointed out, however, that the Company can not accept any responsibility for loss or damage.

Letters and Telegrams. Mail and telegrams intended to be sent from the next port of call should be delivered to the purser or one of his assistants at the purser’s office. No other ship’s employees are authorized to receive mail to be posted. Stamps are sold at the purser’s office.

Wireless Telegraph Service. Passengers may obtain all information about the sending of wireless telegrams from the Chief Steward.

Steamer Chairs and Rugs. Upon application to the deck stewards, steamer chairs and rugs, can be rented during the voyage, at a charge of $1.00 each. Places for steamer chairs are assigned by the deck steward.

Baggage. Large pieces of baggage cannot be taken into the cabins and should be placed in the Baggage Room. Access to the Baggage Room may be had daily upon application to the room steward. Passengers may have their baggage checked through to their final destination upon application to the Baggage Representative-on board.

Hot and Cold Baths. A number of comfortable public bathrooms are provided on board. The bathroom steward or stewardess will attend to the bath upon the passenger’s request.

Meals.

  • Breakfast at 8:00 am
  • Dinner at 12:00 noon
  • Coffee and Cake at 3.00 pm
  • Supper at 6:00 pm

Smoking Room. The smoking room is open early in the morning until 12:00 pm Smoking is prohibited in the social rooms and the staterooms as well as in the passageways below deck.

Library. The books in the library may be obtained upon application to the library steward, and are at the disposal of passengers free of charge. A list of such books is kept by the library steward. Passengers are requested not to leave books lying on deck or in the social rooms.

Music. The orchestra plays daily for 1 hour either in the forenoon, or in the afternoon, and also for 2 hours in the evening either for concert or dancing.

Amusements. A number of games such as Shuffle Board, Dominoes, Chess, Quoits, etc., are at the disposal of passengers. Moving pictures are shown several times during the trip.

Physician. An experienced physician is attached to the staff of this steamer. For medical attendance in case of sickness contracted on board, no charge is made; medicine is also provided free of charge.

Barber. The barber is authorized to charge for his services according to the tariff fixed by the Company. The price list will be found in the barber shop.

European Railroad Tickets. Railroad tickets to points in Continental Europe may be purchased from the Purser on board; passengers will find this a great convenience, and it will avoid unnecessary delays after arrival in Hamburg.

Foreign Money. The purser is prepared to exchange foreign money and will meet passengers’ wishes as far as possible. Travelers' checks of well known companies and banks will be taken in payment, provided the amount of the check does not greatly exceed the amount of the bill to be paid. Personal bank checks cannot be cashed.

Money Orders

The Hamburg America Line accepts money for transmission to Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Hungary. Payment is effected in actual U. S. Dollars. For rates, apply to any of our offices or agents.

Landing at New York

Citizens and bonafide residents of Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Poland and Luxemburg are now examined in their respective countries by the U. S. Public Health Doctors and Immigration officials, and upon arrival in New York, are discharged at the pier, thus avoiding the necessity of going to Ellis Island.

United States Citizens. Returning Resident Aliens holding Re-entry Permits, and persons coming for a temporary visit for business or pleasure, are also discharged at the pier, the same as First and Second Class passengers.

Source: SS Albert Ballin Passenger List - 6 July 1927

 

Information for Passengers - 20 December 1933

New York Mail for Passengers. The New York Office of the Hamburg-Amerika Linie has made arrangements that mail addressed to passengers arriving in New York may be obtained at the principal exit on the upper floor of the Pier. This only applies to such letters, etc., that arrive too late to be delivered to passengers on board during their stay at the quarantine station.

Landing Card. On arrival in New York the "Landing card" attached to your ticket is to be handed to the Immigration Officer for endorsement. First-class passengers will receive the landing cards by the purser during the voyage.

New York Porter Service. Passengers are reminded that the porters on the New York piers are not allowed to ask for gratuities in consideration of the handling of passengers' baggage, they being paid sufficient wages for their services. If, nevertheless, any porter should demand payment for handling such baggage, passengers are requested to note the number plate on his cap and to report him to one of the uniformed policemen on the pier.

In addition, passengers are earnestly advised to direct their enquiries concerning baggage or passage matters exclusively to persons who, by their uniforms, are plainly seen to be Hapag employees. Failing this precaution, they expose themselves to the risk of being taken advantage of by unauthorized persons.

Passengers proceeding to interior Destinations. Wireless advance bookings of Pullman, sleeping and parlor car accommodation for the journey from New York to places situated in the interior may be effected on board through the intermediary of the Purser.

Sailing Permits for Non-Americans. Non-Americans (including visitors to the United States who intend a temporary stay only) must obtain, prior to their departure from the United States, a Sailing Permit, which must be produced previous to going on board, when the final passage ticket is examined. Such Sailing Permits are issued at the Custom House, Battery, New York.

Further information will be gladly given by the Hapag office, 39, Broadway, New York.

Imported Plants and Soil etc. Prohibited. The United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, advises under "Notice of Quarantine No. 37," that plants, soil or other similar materials cannot be imported into the United States, either as souvenirs or in any other category.

Advance Reservations of Automobiles. The Hamburg America Line has made arrangements with the Pennsylvania Cadillac Motor Service, New York, whereby private limousines may be ordered by wireless to our New York piers for arrival of our ships. Information as to rates and all other details are obtainable at the Tourist Department of the Hamburg America Line on board.

TOURIST DEPARTMENT OF THE HAMBURG-AMERIKA LINIE On the B-Deck of the SS ALBERT BALLIN an Office of the Tourist Department has been established. This Office furnishes information to passengers concerning the sailings of the steamers, the railway services from port of arrival to the interior, the air service and all other arrangements of the Hamburg-Amerika Linie.

It also provides information with regard to customhouse and passport arrangements and other matters which are of importance to travelers. At the Office tickets are issued for railroads and steamers to all parts of the world.

Source: SS Albert Ballin Passenger List - 20 December 1933

 

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Hamburg-American Line Advertisement, SS Cleveland Passenger List, 7 June 1930.

Hamburg-American Line Advertisement, SS Cleveland Passenger List, 7 June 1930. Faster across the Atlantic, without Sacrificing Their Smooth and Steady Passage, the Steamships Albert Ballin, Deutschland, Hamburg, and New York Have Been Equipped with New Turbines, Enabling Them to Cross the Atlantic to and from New York in 7 Days. GGA Image ID # 2067a1ad01

 

 

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Books

 

Front Cover, The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs, 193 Views, 1897-1927.

The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs - 1983

Sumptuous volume recalls the glorious early years of elegant transatlantic travel. Over 190 historic photographs depict exterior and interior views of 101 great ocean liners, including the Virginian, Imperator, Vaterland, Bismarck, Lusitania, Mauretania, Balmoral Castle, Titanic, Olympic, Aquitania and dozens more. Full captions.

 

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Provisioning the SS Albert Ballin - 1925

Graphic Display of the Provisions Required for a Round Trip from Hamburg to New York and the Return to Hamburg.

Graphic Display of the Provisions Required for a Round Trip from Hamburg to New York and the Return to Hamburg. The Transatlantic Trade, April 1925. GGA Image ID # 1dad793d27

The average passenger on the enormous modern liner probably takes for granted all the conveniences and luxuries offered him on board and doesn't stop to think that provisioning an ocean liner requires long years of experimenting and development to reach the high standard of today.

It is interesting indeed to take a look at the mechanism that makes life on board ship flow along as smoothly as in one's own home; the extent and intricacy of the organization, the amount of labor involved to supply food for those on board, furnish entertaining facts not known by many.

Of all the forces at work, involving hundreds of heads and hands, it is incredible to learn that considerably more persons are required to prepare the daily meals than to conduct the ship safely from port to port and to attend to the machinery.

Vast quantities of provisions must be stored in the mysterious depths of the vessel as the following simple arithmetic example will show: A ship like the "Albert Ballin" booked to capacity has to furnish meals for more than 1600 people a day, which makes 32,000 meals during a round trip Hamburg—New York-Hamburg of 20 days, or about the daily consumption of a fair sized town.

The whimsical picture shown here helps our imagination by placing the accumulated supplies in excellent order before our eyes. This is, of course, a pure product of fancy, for the provisions are not heaped up on the wharf, nor does the meat walk on board in neat herds and flocks.

However, the proportionate quantities of the provisions pictured are proper to fact. The procession is headed by some 1,700 people ready to embark.

Then comes a herd of well-fattened pigs supplying 7,000 lbs. of pork, followed by a herd of calves equaling 8,000 lbs. of veal, and cattle, amounting to 31,000 lbs. of beef.

The bearers of 1400 lbs. of venison, 6,000 lbs. of mutton, and lambs supplying 1000 lbs. of meat come next while flocks of all kinds of fowl amounting to 10,800 lbs. close the procession.

Every "Albert Ballin" round trip requires 10,400 lbs. of fish, 5,000 oysters and crabs, 1,200 lobsters, and 90 lbs. of caviar, and 55,000 eggs are used on every round trip, 11,200 quarts of milk and cream, 6,000 lbs. of butter and 4,000 lbs. of cheese, and a supply of ham, bacon, and sausage in the amount of 150 cwt.

Meat and dairy products alone will not satisfy the traveler of today, though; he demands vegetables and fruits. These are brought on board in the following quantities: 1,000 cwt. of potatoes, 325 cwt. of fresh vegetables, 220 cwt. of canned vegetables, and 10,000 lbs. of dried vegetables.

40,000 lbs. of flour is required, some of which is converted into bread with 600 lbs. of yeast and all kinds of cake. 9,000 lbs. of sugar, 600 lbs. of chocolate, 37,000 lbs. of fruit, 3,500 lbs. of coffee and 200 lbs. of tea, 1,600 bricks of ice cream, and 20 tons of ice are required.

As for beverages, 3,200 bottles of wine from various countries, 14,100 quarts and 2,300 bottles of beer, 700 bottles of liqueur, 8,700 bottles of mineral water, and 1,400 tons of drinking water make up the stock on board. The provisions for a round trip on the "Albert Ballin" total over 400,000 lbs. and beverages over 20,000 quarts.

"Provisioning S. S. 'Albert Ballin' of the Hamburg America Line," in The Transatlantic Trade: The Magazine That Reports on Affairs in Germany, Berlin: American Chamber of Commerce in Germany, Vol. 6, No. 4, April 1925, pp. 121-122.

 

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Hamburg-American Liner Albert Ballin Launched - 1922

The United American Lines announced that the new transatlantic liner Albert Ballin was successfully launched on 16 December 1922. The Albert Ballin is the first of two large modem steamers ordered by the Hamburg- American Line since the war from the Blohm and Voss yard at Hamburg.

She is expected to enter service between Hamburg and New York via Southampton and Cherbourg in May. Before the war, the Hamburg-American Line operated the largest fleet of merchant ships in the world, aggregating over a million tons, and had a worldwide organization.

The three largest passenger vessels ever built were built for the Hamburg-American Line. In planning for the Albert Ballin, the line has called upon its vast experience and the most advanced shipbuilding principles to give the new vessels maximum comfort, luxury, and efficiency.

Among other notable features, the Albert Ballin will be the first ship to incorporate a new anti-rolling tank, which Dr. Frahm of the Blohm and Voss Shipbuilding Company has recently devised. The Albert Ballin is a twin-screw steamer of over the 600-foot length and 22,000 tons gross register.

She is an oil burner, propelled by turbine engines capable of 13,000 horsepower and 15 1/2 knots speed. Her passenger accommodations are 250 first class, including several deluxe suites, 340-second class, and 1,100 third class.

Spacious Lounges and dining saloons are provided with many unique features, including a grill room, gymnasium, electric bath, passenger elevators, etc.

The Hamburg-American Line is also building the Deutschland, a sister ship of the Albert Ballin, which is expected to be completed later in 1923.

"Hamburg-American Liner Albert Ballin Launched," in The Marine Journal, New York: The Marie Journal Company, Vol. 45, no. 26, 23 December 1922, p. 20.

 

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