SS Deutschland Archival Collection

 

 

Deutschland (1899) Hamburg-American Line

The SS Deutschland (1899) of the Hamburg-American Line (HAPAG), Shown Departing on a Voyage.

The SS Deutschland (1899) of the Hamburg-American Line (HAPAG), Shown Departing on a Voyage. Photo by A. Loeffler. Library of Congress LC # 2004671897. GGA Image ID # 1d7321210d

Built by A. G. "Vulkan", Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 16,502. Dimensions: 660' x 67' (686' o.l.). Propulsion: Twin-screw, 23 knots. Quadruple expansion engines. Masts and Funnels: Two masts and four funnels. She had 16 boilers, 112 furnaces and developed 36,000 I.H.P. Building cost amounted to $3,200,000. Note: The only Hamburg-American liner to hold the trans-Atlantic speed record. Passengers: 690 first, 300 second, 280 third. Maiden voyage: Hamburg-Plymouth-New York, July 4, 1900. Cruising: Converted to cruise ship in 1910. Renamed: (a) Victoria Luise (1911), (b) Hansa (1922). Fate: Scrapped in 1925.

 

Deutschland (1923) Hamburg-American Line

SS Deutschland (1923) of the Hamburg-American Line at Sea.

SS Deutschland (1923) of the Hamburg-American Line at Sea. Crossing the Atlantic in Third Class, 1924. GGA Image ID # 1d732b9b2e

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 20,607. Dimensions: 602 x 72'. Propulsion: Twin-screw, 16 knots. Steam turbines. Masts and Funnels: Four masts and two funnels. Passengers: 180 first, 400 second, 935 third. Maiden voyage: Hamburg- Southampton-New York, March 27, 1924. Modifications: Lengthened in 1933-34 to 645 feet (21,046 tons). Speed increased to 20 knots by new engines and new type bow to replace the original straight stem. Fate: Sunk by Allied air attack off Neustadt, May 3, 1945. Dismantled for scrap in 1948. Sister ship: Albert Ballin. Note: The New York and Hamburg were very similar, except they had only two masts.

 

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Passenger Manifest, Hamburg-Amerika Linie SS Deutschland, 1909

1909-10-07 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 7 October 1909
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Carl Kaempff

 

Front Cover, SS Deutschland Passenger List 30 July 1926

1926-07-30 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: First and Second Class
  • Date of Departure: 30 July 1926
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton
  • Commander: Captain Schwamberger
  • Récapitulation: Listings of 44 Senior Officers and Staff Members, 220 First Cabin, and 408 Second Cabin Passengers.

 

1927-08-12 Passenger Manifest for the SS Deutschland

1927-08-12 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 12 August 1927
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton
  • Commander: Captain Langer
  • Récapitulation: Listings of 44 Senior Officers and Staff Members, 216 First Cabin, and 383 Second Cabin Passengers.

 

1927-09-23 Passenger Manifest of SS Deutschland

1927-09-23 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: Third Class
  • Date of Departure: 14 September 1927
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton
  • Commander: Captain Langer

 

1928-10-12 Passenger Manifest of SS Deutschland

1928-10-12 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: Third Class
  • Date of Departure: 12 October 1928
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton
  • Commander: Captain Langer

 

1930-08-22 SS Deutschland Tourist Third Cabin Passenger List

1930-08-22 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Class of Passengers: First Class
  • Date of Departure: 22 August 1930
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Buch
  • Note: First Class, Tourist Third Cabin, and Third Class each had their own passenger list booklet.
  • Récapitulation: 289 First Class, 375 Tourist Third Cabin, and 500 Third Class for a total of 1,164 Passengers and 47 Crew Members are listed for this voyage.

 

1935-08-15 Passenger Manifest of SS Deutschland

1935-08-15 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: First and Tourist Class
  • Date of Departure: 15 August 1935
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton, Cherbourg, and Cobh (Queenstown)
  • Commander: Captain Dau

 

1936-08-27 Passenger Manifest for the SS Deutschland

1936-08-27 SS Deutschland Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)
  • Class of Passengers: Class not Stated
  • Date of Departure: 27 August 1936
  • Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain Friedel

 

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Front Cover, Across the Atlantic -- Hamburg-American Line, 1905.

Across the Atlantic - Hamburg American Line - 1905

Although small in size, this 80 page booklet / brochure from 1905 provides an excellent record of the steamships and services of the Transatlantic Fleet of the Hamburg America Line. Ships Covered Included the Blücher, Deutschland, Graf Waldersee, Hamburg, Moltke, Patricia, Pennsylvania, Pretoria, Prinz Adalbert, Prinz Oskar, and Prinzessin Victoria Luise.

 

Brochure Cover, The New Twin Screw Steamship Deutschland of the Hamburg America Line.

The New Twin Screw Steamship Deutschland - 1924

8-Panel Flyer offers a quick look at the SS Deutschland, a 21,046-ton ship, launched on 28 April 1923 with her maiden voyage on 27 March 1924. Superb interior photographs create a visual feast of this elegant ship of the Hamburg America Line (HAPAG).

 

Covers for the 1928 Hamburg American Line Brochure Across the Atlantic - First Class.

HAPAG - Across the Atlantic in First Class - 1928

Outstanding brochure from the Hamburg America Line captures the opulence of first-class transatlantic travel in the late 1920s. Rare interior photographs of public rooms such as the shopping plaza or promenade make this an excellent booklet. Ships Featured: Resolute and Reliance, New York, Hamburg, Albert Ballin, and Deutschland.

 

Front Cover for a Joint Line Brochure from Hamburg America Line and North German Lloyd Entitled Go Tourist Class.

HAPAG-North German Lloyd - Go Tourist Class - 1936

26-Page Brochure "Go Tourist Class" is a joint production of HAPAG-NDL. Profusely Illustrated with interior photographs of Tourist Class accommodations and ships of both lines that carried passengers of that class. A superb brochure produced for American tourist of the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany. Bremen, Europa, Columbus, Berlin, New York, Hamburg, Deutschland, Hansa, and St. Louis.

 

Front Cover of 1937 Brochure from the Hamburg-American and North German Lloyd on their Transatlantic Ships.

1937-10 HAPAG-NDL Ships in the Transatlantic Service

14-page small format brochure produced jointly by HAPAG-LLOYD welcomes you to Germany in 1937 on their transatlantic ships Bremen, Europa, Columbus, New York, Hamburg, Hansa, Deutschland, St. Louis, and Berlin. Brief information along with a photograph of each ship is included in this booklet.

 

Front Cover, Hamburg America Line 1938 Brochure "In The Third Class to North America."

In der Dritten Klasse nach Nordamerika - 1938

Es handelt sich um eine gut erhaltene Broschüre veröffentlicht wurde, dass vor dem Beginn des europäischen Konflikt, der sich aus dem Zweiten Weltkrieg. Superb Fotografie macht dies ein Rekord excecptional der dritten Klasse Unterkünfte auf dem Dampfer Deutschland, New York, Hamburg und die Hanse.

In The Third Class to North America - 1938

This is a well-preserved brochure that was published before the beginning of the European conflict that became World War II. Superb photography makes this an exceptional record of the Third Class accommodations on the steamships Deutschland, New York, Hamburg, and the Hansa. Translated from the German.

 

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SS Deutschland Breakfast Bill of Fare 26 February 1902

1902-02-26 SS Deutschland Breakfast Menu

Breakfast Bill of Fare for 26 February 1902 featured a typical American fare including Buckwheat Pancakes, Omelots, Ham, Bacon, in addition to Rumpsteak, Calf's Liver and Grilled Vienna Sausages.

 

Vintage Breakfast Menu Card From Sunday, 2 March 1902 Onboard the Express Steamer SS Deutschland of the Hamburg America Line

1902-03-02 SS Deutschland Breakfast Menu Card

Vintage Breakfast Bill of Fare Card from 2 March 1902 featured Eggs Périgueux Style, Potato-Pancake with Cranberries, and Omelet aux Confitures.

 

Vintage Menu, Hamburg America Line, SS Deutschland, 30 September 1927

1927-09-30 SS Deutschland Daily Menu Card

Vintage Third Class Daily Bill of Fare Card from 30 September 1927 on board the SS Deutschland of the Hamburg America Line featured Boiled Eggs for Breakfast, Braised Fillet of Fish for Dinner, and Matjes Herrings, Bacon Sauce for Supper.

 

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Receipt from Intercollegiate Travel Bureau, 1932

SS Hamburg and SS Deutschland Passage Receipt - 11 April 1932

Receipt that itemized a round-trip voyage to Europe for Mr. and Mrs. David S. Kane via the SS Hamburg and SS Deutschland of the Hamburg America Line in 1932.

 

Front Side, Hamburg America Line Purchaser's Receipt and Contract for Prepaid Ticket and Passage

SS Deutschland Passage Receipt and Contract - 5 June 1933

Tourist Class Passage for Three Family Members living in Berlin prepaid by another family member living in Maryland for a voyage from Hamburg to New York, departing 5 June 1933 on the Hamburg America Line steamship Deutschland.

 

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Front Cover, On Board Events Program Covering a Transatlantic Voyage of the SS Deutchland Beginning Thursday, 27 August 1936.

1936-08-27 Voyage Events Program - SS Deutschland

Tourist Class Events Program on the SS Deutschland of the Hamburg America Line for the voyage beginning 27 August 1936. Activities included Dances, Movies, Concerts, "Get-Togethers," Horse Races, Beer Parity, and Horse Races.

 

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Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer, Plymouth, Southampton, and Cherbourg, from 7 October 1900 to 19 January 1901.

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer, Plymouth, Southampton, and Cherbourg, from 7 October 1900 to 19 January 1901. Ships Included the Auguste Victoria, Belgravia, Bulgaria, Cap Frio, Columbia, Deutschland, Fürst Bismarck, Graf Waldersee, Kaiser Friedrich, Patricia, Pennsylvania, and Pretoria. SS Patricia Passenger List, 7 October 1900. GGA Image ID # 1ed8c97071

 

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Southampton-Cherbourg-New York and New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Hamburg, from 17 April 1902 to 30 October 1902.

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Southampton-Cherbourg-New York and New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Hamburg, from 17 April 1902 to 30 October 1902. Ships Included The August Victoria, Columbia, Deutschland, and Fürst Bismarck. SS Pennsylvania Passenger List, 22 April 1902. GGA Image ID # 1ee4108b03

 

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Dover-Boulogne-Cherbourg-New York, from 29 July 1905 to 2 December 1905.

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Dover-Boulogne-Cherbourg-New York, from 29 July 1905 to 2 December 1905. Ships Included the Amerika, Blücher, Deutschland, Fürst Bismarck, Graf Waldersee, Hamburg, Moltke, Patricia, Pennsylvania, and Pretoria. SS Graf Waldersee Passenger List, 29 July 1905. GGA Image ID # 1f06676725

 

Sailing Schedule, Mediterranean Service (Genoa-Palermo-Naples-New York), from 21 August 1906 to 23 April 1907.

Sailing Schedule, Mediterranean Service (Genoa-Palermo-Naples-New York), from 21 August 1906 to 23 April 1907. Ships Included the Deutschland, Hamburg, Moltke, Oceana, and Prinz Adalbert. SS Moltke Passenger List, 21 August 1906. GGA Image ID # 1e437bf4d0

 

Twin-Screw Express and Passenger Steamship Services, and Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Southampton-Boulogne sur Mer-Cherbourg-Plymouth-New York, from 23 August 2906 to 27 October 1906.

Twin-Screw Express and Passenger Steamship Services, and Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Southampton-Boulogne sur Mer-Cherbourg-Plymouth-New York, from 23 August 2906 to 27 October 1906. Ships Included the Amerika, Batavia, Blücher, Deutschland, Graf Waldersee, Hamburg, Kaiserin Auguste Victoria, Oceana, Patricia, Pennsylvania, and Pretoria. SS Moltke Passenger List, 21 August 1906. GGA Image ID # 1e43a0cfd7

 

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 7 October 1909 to 15 February 1910.

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 7 October 1909 to 15 February 1910. Ships Included the Amerika, Blücher, Bulgaria, Cincinnati, Deutschland, Graf Waldersee, Kaiserin Auguste Victoria, Pennsylvania, President Grant, and the President Lincoln. SS Deutschland Passenger List, 7 October 1909. GGA Image ID # 1e41f7f6aa

 

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 28 January 1926 to 1 June 1926.

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 28 January 1926 to 1 June 1926. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. The listing includes the Name of the Ship's Commander. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e482ac29d

 

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 27 August 1926 to 1 December 1926.

Scheduled Sailings, Hamburg-Amerika Linie (HAPAG), and United American Lines (Harriman Line) from 27 August 1926 to 1 December 1926. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. The listing includes the Name of the Ship's Commander. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 28 January 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e496a80d7

 

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings to Europe, From 6 July 1927 to 5 January 1928.

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings to Europe, From 6 July 1927 to 5 January 1928. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, New York, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. Listing States Classes of Passengers Carried and the Ship's Commander. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e49d8e1bf

 

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings from Europe, From 7 July 1927 to 31 December 1927.

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings from Europe, From 7 July 1927 to 31 December 1927. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, New York, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. Listing States Classes of Passengers Carried. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e4a28ba52

 

Proposed Sailing List, Hamburg-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 19 April 1929 to 15 August 1929.

Proposed Sailing List, Hamburg-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 19 April 1929 to 15 August 1929. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, Milwaukee, Reliance, Resolute, St. Louis, Thuringia, and Westphalia. SS Hamburg Passenger List, 19 April 1929. GGA Image ID # 1e0152e801

 

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-American Line and North German Lloyd, Hamburg-New York or Bremen-New York, from 9 July 1936 to 15 December 1936.

Sailing Schedule, Hamburg-American Line and North German Lloyd, Hamburg-New York or Bremen-New York, from 9 July 1936 to 15 December 1936. Ships Included Berlin, Bremen, Columbus, Deutschland, Europa, Hamburg, Hansa, New York, and St. Louis. SS Hamburg Passenger List, 2 July 1936. GGA Image ID # 1e01667c03

 

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Speed Records of the Twin-Screw Express Steamer SS Deutschland.

Speed Records of the Twin-Screw Express Steamer SS Deutschland Includes Maiden Record, Fastest Eastbound and Westbound Trips, Fastest Trip to Italy, and Highest Day's Run. SS Batavia Passenger List, 1 June 1907. GGA Image ID # 1ec54e615e

 

Hamburg-American Line Advertisement, SS Cleveland Passenger List, 7 June 1930.

Hamburg-American Line Advertisement, SS Cleveland Passenger List, 7 June 1930. Faster across the Atlantic, without Sacrificing Their Smooth and Steady Passage, the Steamships Albert Ballin, Deutschland, Hamburg, and New York Have Been Equipped with New Turbines, Enabling Them to Cross the Atlantic to and from New York in 7 Days. GGA Image ID # 2067a1ad01

 

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The SS Deutschand (1899) at Hoboken Pier (New York) in 1905. Photo by Detroit Publishing Company. Library of Congress LCN 2016804747. GGA Image ID # 1d753128fd

 

The Swift SS Deutschland (1899) of the Hamburg-American Line.

The Swift SS Deutschland (1899) of the Hamburg-American Line. The Scientific-American Handbook of Travel, 1910. GGA Image ID # 1d732e0727

 

Marconi Operator Aboard the Ship "Deutschland," at His Instruments on the 27 August 1904.

Marconi Operator Aboard the Ship "Deutschland," at His Instruments on the 27 August 1904. Bains News Service. Library of Congress LC # 2014683102. GGA Image ID # 1d758eec63

The radio operator in the German ocean liner SS Deutschland radio room, showed the early Marconi wireless telegraphy equipment. On the right is the spark transmitter, consisting of an induction coil, Leyden jar capacitors behind it, a spark gap, and an oscillation transformer ("jigger") inside the wooden box on the wall.

The operator transmitted information by tapping on a switch called a telegraph key (visible behind the coil) which turned the spark on and off, transmitting pulses of radio waves to spell out text messages in Morse code. On the left is the receiver, which recorded Morse code messages with an ink line on paper tape, which the operator later translated into text.

 

The Marconi Operator on board the SS Deutschland (1896) Sending a Wireless Message on 27 August 1904.

The Marconi Operator on board the SS Deutschland (1896) Sending a Wireless Message on 27 August 1904. Bains News Service. Library of Congress LC # 2014683101. GGA Image ID # 1d7598e3bd

British-Italian entrepreneur Guglielmo Marconi invented the first practical radio transmitters and receivers in 1896. The Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company produced the equipment, and the radio operator was also an employee. The first significant radio use was on ships to keep in touch with the shore and call for rescue in emergencies.

Marconi's company dominated the marine wireless industry throughout the spark era until the 1920s, to the degree that the ship radio room was called the "Marconi room."

 

The SS Deutschland (1899) of the Hamburg-American Line Leaving New York ca 1901.

The SS Deutschland (1899) of the Hamburg-American Line Leaving New York ca 1901. Chromolithograph by Detroit Photographic Company. Library of Congress LC # 2018756498. GGA Image ID # 1d759cccfa

 

SS Deutschland in the Open Seas.

SS Deutschland in the Open Seas. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb79463bb

 

Cupola and Main Saloon of the SS Deutschland.

Cupola and Main Saloon of the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb7b042bb

 

Main Saloon of the SS Deutschland.

Main Saloon of the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb7f2049c

 

Ladies' Parlor of the SS Deutschland.

Ladies' Parlor of the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb822362c

 

Partial View of Drawing Room on the SS Deutschland.

Partial View of Drawing Room on the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb846c8a2

 

Companionway on the SS Deutschland.

Companionway on the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb85f5d77

 

Smoking Room on the SS Deutschland.

Smoking Room on the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb88038e4

 

Grill Room on the SS Deutshcland.

Grill Room on the SS Deutshcland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb8e12e89

 

Second Cabin Ladies' Parlor on the SS Deutschland.

Second Cabin Ladies' Parlor on the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb8eb9691

 

Second Cabin Smoking Room on the SS Deutschland.

Second Cabin Smoking Room on the SS Deutschland. Across the Atlantic, 1905 HAPAG Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1bb9a39794

 

The SS Deutschland (1923) Departing from Cuxhaven (Hamburg).

The SS Deutschland (1923) Departing from Cuxhaven (Hamburg). HAPAG Passenger List, Deutschland, 1928. GGA Image ID # 1d73968506

 

The SS Deutschland (1923) Tied Up at Pier at the Port of Hamburg in 1932.

The SS Deutschland (1923) Tied Up at Pier at the Port of Hamburg in 1932. On the Bow, the Hamburg Coat of Arms for the Home Port. GGA Image ID # 1d75dd1f7b

 

SS Deutschland (1923) Was Converted Into a Hospital Ship at the End of the Second World War in 1945.

SS Deutschland (1923) Was Converted Into a Hospital Ship at the End of the Second World War in 1945. GGA Image ID # 1d7520281b

 

The SS New York, SS Hamburg, SS Albert Ballin, and SS Deutschland.

The SS New York, SS Hamburg, SS Albert Ballin, and SS Deutschland. 11,500 Tons -- 633 Feet Long -- 79 Feet Wide -- Twin Screw Turbine -- Oil Burning -- 13,000 Horsepower. Across the Atlantic in First Class, 1928 Brochure. GGA Image ID # 11c121779b

 

First Class Lounge on the SS Deutschland.

First Class Lounge. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b422a295

 

First Class Ladies' Parlor on the SS Deutschland.

First Class Ladies' Parlor. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b4320102

 

Passengers Relax on the Promenade Deck.

Passengers Relax on the Promenade Deck. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b43d2967

 

First Class Dining Room on the SS Deutschland.

First Class Dining Room. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b461ef35

 

View of a First Class Stateroom on the SS Deutschland.

View of a First Class Stateroom. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b494e232

 

View of Stateroom in a First Class Suite.

View of Stateroom in a First Class Suite. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b4bad461

 

Second Cabin Social Hall on the SS Deutschland.

Second Cabin Social Hall. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b4d069d5

 

First Class Smoking Room on the SS Deutschland.

First Class Smoking Room. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b4f3d85f

 

Passengers on the Boat Deck of the SS Deutschland.

Passengers on the Boat Deck. New Twin Screw SS Deutschland Brochure, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11b51139c3

 

Tourist Third Cabin Dining Room on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924..

Tourist Third Cabin Dining Room on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924.. GGA Image ID # 1e42949472

 

Tourist Third Cabin Ladies' Parlor on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924..

Tourist Third Cabin Ladies' Parlor on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924.. GGA Image ID # 1e42e3a2cb

 

Tourist Third Cabin Smoking Room on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924.

Tourist Third Cabin Smoking Room on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924. GGA Image ID # 1e42eddec6

 

Tourist Third Cabin Stateroom on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924.

Tourist Third Cabin Stateroom on Board the SS Deutschland, 1924. GGA Image ID # 1e43113b91

 

Corner of Third-Class Dining Room on the SS Deutchland (1923).

Corner of Third-Class Dining Room on the SS Deutchland (1923). HAPAG Passenger List, Deutschland, 1927. GGA Image ID # 1d7399d8ed

 

Third Class Ladies' Lounge on the SS Deutschland (1923).

Third Class Ladies' Lounge on the SS Deutschland (1923). HAPAG Passenger List, Deutschland, 1927. GGA Image ID # 1d73b333a5

 

Third Class Passengers Relaxing on the SS Deutschland (1923) Promenade Deck.

Third Class Passengers Relaxing on the SS Deutschland (1923) Promenade Deck. HAPAG Passenger List, Deutschland, 1927. GGA Image ID # 1d740361ff

 

Third-Class Smoking Room on the SS Deutschland (1923).

Third-Class Smoking Room on the SS Deutschland (1923). HAPAG Passenger List, Deutschland, 1928. GGA Image ID # 1d745b3af4

 

Third-Class Bath (A) and Typical Stateroom (B) on the SS Deutschland (1923).

Third-Class Bath (A) and Typical Stateroom (B) on the SS Deutschland (1923). HAPAG Passenger List, Deutschland, 1928. GGA Image ID # 1d7475e9ce

 

The SS Deutschland of the Hamburg America Line.

The SS Deutschland of the Hamburg America Line. Go Tourist Class - Hamburg American Line and North German Lloyd Brochure, 10 February 1936. GGA Image ID # 125fd14d07

 

The SS Bremen and Europa of the North German Lloyd.

The SS Bremen and Europa of the North German Lloyd. Go Tourist Class, 1936 Brochure. GGA Image ID # 125d330e8a

 

HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE EXPRESS S.S. DEUTSCHLAND.

HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE EXPRESS S.S. DEUTSCHLAND. Cabin Class, Tourist Class, Third Class. Tonnage 21,046. Length 640. Breadth 79. Built 1923. No. Decks 8. Ships in the Transatlantic Service, 1937 Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1274a58e69

 

Tourist Class Dining Room on the SS Deutschland.

Tourist Class Dining Room on the SS Deutschland. Go Tourist Class, 1936 Brochure. GGA Image ID # 1260ced189

 

Bird's Eye View of Manhattan Skyscrapers, New York Viewed by Passengers of the SS Deutschland.

Bird's Eye View of Manhattan Skyscrapers, New York Viewed by Passengers of the SS Deutschland, circa 1927. GGA Image ID # 17733c7fea

 

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Colorized Postcard of the SS Deutschland of the Hamburg American Line Approaching Landing Stage, 1900.

Colorized Postcard of the SS Deutschland of the Hamburg American Line Approaching Landing Stage, 1900. GGA Image ID # 1772d74ea2

 

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Information for Passengers - 23 September 1927

ATTENDANCE. Passengers are requested to bring any com- jj plaints to the notice of the Chiefsteward, and, if the complaint is not promptly investigated, to apply to the Purser or to the Captain.

VALUABLES OR MONEY. Valuables or money should not be left in the cabin, but be placed in charge of the Purser in his safe.

No responsibility, however, can be accepted by the Company.

Wireless telegrams are accepted by the Radio Officer on duty in the Third Class.

PHYSICIAN. For medical attendance in case of sickness con­tracted on board no charge is made; medicines are also provided free of cost.

BAGGAGE. The baggageroom where all large trunks are stored will be open daily at certain hours. Passengers are requested to refer all baggage matters during the voyage to the baggage official on duty. Arrangements between passengers and stewards or other members of the crew are not binding on the Company. For hand baggage the Company will assume no responsibility.

Passengers are reminded that the porters on the New York piers are not allowed to ask for gratuities in consideration of the hand­ling of passengers’ baggage, they being paid sufficient wages for their services. If, nevertheless, any porter should demand payment for handling such baggage, passengers are requested to note the number plate on his cap and to report him to one of the uniformed policemen on the pier.

Information for Immigrants

Notice to Immigrants

In America, arriving passengers receive willingly and free information and advice in the following locations:

  • Lutheran Immigrant Society, 280 East 61 st Street, New York City
  • German Immigrant Home »Bethanien«, 205 East 53rd Street, New York City and 255 East 50th Street, New York City
  • Leo House, 330 West 23rd Street, New YorksCity (Catholic)
  • Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (Hias), 140 East 40th Street, New York City
  • Travelers Aid Society, 142 East 44th Street, New York City

Source: SS Deutschland Passenger List - 23 September 1927

 

Information for First Class Passengers - 22 August 1930

Promenade Deck. In order to assure quietness throughout the ship, passengers are respectfully requested not to use the promenade deck for promenading purposes during the hours between 11:00 pm and 7:00 am

Baggage Insurance on Board. Passengers who omitted, prior to the commencement of their passage, to insure their baggage against all or any risks can still do so, at moderate rates of premium and at favourable terms, upon application to the Purser or Baggage Master on board.

New York Mail for Passengers. The New York Office of the Hamburg-Amerika Linie has made arrangements that mail addressed to passengers arriving in New York may be obtained at the principal exit on the upper floor of the Pier. This only applies to such letters, etc., that arrive too late to be delivered to passengers on board during their stay at the quarantine station.

Landing Card. On arrival in New York the "Landing Card" attached to your ticket is to be handed to the Immigration Officer for endorsement. First-class passengers will receive the landing cards by the purser during the voyage.

New York Porter Service. Passengers are reminded that the porters on the New York piers are not allowed to ask for gratuities in consideration of the handling of passengers' luggage, they being paid sufficient wages for their services.

If, nevertheless, any porter should demand payment for handling such baggage, passengers are requested to note the number plate on Ins tap and to report him to one of the uniformed policemen on the pier In addition, passengers are earnestly advised to direct their enquiries concerning baggage or passage matters exclusively to persons who, by their uniforms, are plainly seen to be Hapag employees.

Tailing this precaution, they expose themselves to the risk of being taken advantage of by unauthorized persons.

Passengers proceeding to interior Destinations. Wireless advance bookings of Pullman, sleeping .nut parlor car accommodation for the journey from New York to places situated in the interior may be effected on board through the intermediary of the Purser.

Sailing Permits for Non-Americans. Non-Americans (including visitors to the United States who intend a temporary stay only) must obtain, prior to their departure from the United States, a Sailing Permit, which must be produced previous to going on board, when the final passage ticket is examined. Such Sailing Permits are issued at the Custom House, Battery, New York.

Further information will be gladly given by the Hapag office, 39, Broadway, New York.

Use of Gymnasium. The operation of the gymnastic and massage appliances in the Gymnasium on board our vessels, more particularly the switching on and off of the electric current, must be exclusively effected by the oflicials. specially appointed to attend to them.

The Hamburg-American line do not hold themselves liable for any injury or accidents that may happen in connection with the use of the gymnasiums or the appliances that form their equipment.

Children cannot be admitted, unless accompanied by adults.

Use of Baths and Swimming Baths. Passengers using the baths and swimming baths on board our vessels do so entirely at their own risk and at their own responsibility. The Hamburg America Line do not hold themselves in any way liable for any damage, injury or accident that may be caused by such use.

Stateroom Portholes. In order to avoid accidents passengers are requested not to open or close the portholes in their staterooms, but to ask their Room Steward to do so.

Imported Plants and Soil etc. Prohibited. The United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, advises under "Notice of Quarantine No. 37," that plants, soil or other similar materials cannot be imported into the United States, either as souvenirs or in any other category.

Source: SS Deutschland Passenger List - 22 August 1930

 

Information for Tourist Third Cabin Passengers - 22 August 1930

Prepaids of the Hamburg America Line. Should you wish to have your family, relatives or friends follow you to the United States or Canada, we would recommend you to buy for them a Prepaid ticket over our Line. For this purpose please apply to one of our own offices in the Unites States or Canada, or to any of our agencies in the cities and larger towns of the United States and Canada, which will be glad to furnish any information desired, and issue Prepaid tickets over our Line without additional charge.

In Europe all Prepaid passengers will be taken care of by the Agents of the Hamburg America Line appointed in all larger places. They will endeavor to render every possible assistance to Prepaid passengers in securing the necessary papers and eventually the United States visa.

Money orders. By virtue of her efficient agency-organization extending throughout Europe, the Hamburg America Line accepts in the United States Money Orders for transmission to Germany, Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Jugoslavia, Roumania, Poland, Russia, Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. The payments—transmitted by cable or letter—will be effected promptly, and upon request of the remitter either made in United States currency or the currency prevailing in the respective country.

Please apply to any agency of the Hamburg America Line in the United States which will gladly render any desired information as to the convenient and well protective manner of these remittances.

Valuables and money. Valuables or money should not be left in the cabin, but be placed in charge of the Purser in his safe.

No responsibility, however, can be accepted by the Company.

Letters and telegrams. Mail arriving for passengers will be distributed in the office of the Purser.

Letters and postcards written during the voyage may be left at the Purser's Office which on payment of the postage will see that they are forwarded.

Radio telegrams as well as such telegrams intended to be sent through shore telegraph companies are accepted at the Wireless Station.

Physician. Several experienced physicians are attached to the staff of this ship. No charge is made for medical attendance in case of sickness on board; medicines are also provided free of cost. The ship's physicians, however, are allowed to charge the usual fees to travelers who submit themselves to treatment for illness not contracted during the voyage.

Baggage. The baggage room where all large trunks are stored is open daily at certain hours. Passengers are requested to refer all baggage matters during the voyage to the baggage official on duty. Arrangements between passengers and stewards or other members of the crew are not binding on the Company. For hand baggage the Company will assume no responsibility.

Passengers are reminded that the porters on the New York piers are not allowed to ask for gratuities in consideration of the handling of passenger's baggage, they being paid sufficient wages for their services. If, nevertheless, any porter should demand payment for handling such baggage, passengers are requested to note the number plate on his cap and to report him to one of the uniformed policemen on the pier.

Steamer chairs and rugs. Upon application to the deck stewards, steamer chairs and rugs, can be rented during the voyage, at a charge of $1.— each. Places for steamer chairs are assigned by the deck steward.

Meals:

  • Breakfast at 8:00 am
  • Lunch at 12:30 pm.
  • Dinner at 6:30 pm

As well as: Bouillon and Sandwiches at 11:00 am

Coffee and Cake at 3:00 pm

Sandwiches at 9:30 pm

Smoking room. The smoking room is open early in the morning until midnight. Smoking is prohibited in the social rooms and the staterooms as well as in the passageways below deck.

Hot and cold baths. A number of comfortable public bathrooms are provided on board. The room steward or stewardess will attend to the bath upon the passenger's request.

Passengers using the baths on board our vessels do so entirely at their own risk and at their own responsibility. The Hamburg America Line do not hold themselves in any way liable for any damage, injury or accident that may be caused by such use.

Stateroom Portholes. In order to avoid accidents passengers are requested not to open or close the portholes in their staterooms, but to ask their Room-Steward to do so.

Library. The books in the library may be obtained upon application to the library steward, and are at the disposal of passengers free of charge. A list of such books is kept by the library steward. Passengers are requested not to leave books lying on deck or the social rooms.

Music. The orchestra plays daily for 1 hour in the afternoon, and also for 2 hours in the evening either for concert or dancing.

Amusements. A number of games such as Shuffle Board, Dominoes, Chess, Quoits, etc., are at the disposal of passengers. Moving pictures are shown several times during the trip.

Barber. The barber is authorized to charge for his services according to the tariff fixed by the Company. The price list will be found in the barber shop.

Attendance. Passengers are requested to bring any complaints to the notice of the Chief Steward, and, if the complaint is not promptly investigated, to apply to the Purser.

Source: SS Deutschland Passenger List - 22 August 1930

 

Information for Third Class Passengers - 22 August 1930

PREPAIDS ISSUED BY THE HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE. Should you wish to have your family, relatives or friends follow you to the United States or Canada, we would recommend you to buy for them a Prepaid ticket over our Line.

For this purpose please apply to one of our own offices in the United States or Canada or to any of our agencics in the cities and larger towns of the United States and Canada, which will be glad to furnish any Information desired, and issue Prepaid tickets over our Line without additional charge.

In Europe all Prepaid passengers will be taken care of by the Agents of the Hamburg America Line appointed in all towns of any importance. They will endeavor to render every possible assistance to Prepaid passengers in securing the neecssary papers and the United States visa, if required.

SAILING PERMITS FOR NON-AMERICANS. Non-Americans (including visitors to the United States who intend a temporary stay only) must obtain, prior to their departure from the United States, a Sailing Permit, which must be produced previous to going on board, when the final passage ticket is examined. Such Sailing Pcrmits are issued at the Custom House, Battery, New York.

Further Information will be gladly given by the Hapag office, 39, Broadway, New York.

MONEY ORDERS. By virtue of her efficient agency-organization extending throughout Europe, the Hamburg America Line accepts in the United States Money Orders for transmission to Germany, Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Jugoslavia, Roumania, Poland, Russia, Lithuania, Latvia, and Esthonia.

The payments-transmitted by cable or letter-will be effected promptly, and will—upon request of the remitter—be made in United States currency or that of the country concerned.

Please apply to any agency of the Hamburg America Line in the United States which will gladly render any desired information concerning this convenient and safe way of remitting money.

VALUABLES OR MONEY. Valuables or money should not be left in the cabin, but be placed in charge of the Purser in his safe. No responsibility, however, can be accepted by the Company.

LETTERS AND TELEGRAMS. Mail arriving for passengers will be distributed in the office of the Purser.

Letters and postcards written during the voyage may be left at the Pursers Office which, on payment of the postage, will see that they are forwarded.

Radio telegrams as well as such telegrams intended to be sent through shore telegraph companies are accepted at the Wireless Station on the A-Deck.

PHYSICIAN. An experienced physician is attached to the staff of this steamer. No charge is made for medical attendance in case of sickness on board; medicines are also provided free of cost. The ship's physician, however, is allowed to charge the usual fees to travelers who submit themselves to treatment for illness not contracted during the voyage.

BAGGAGE. The baggage room where all large trunks are stored will be open daily at certain hours. Passengers are requested to refer all baggage matters during the voyage to the baggage official on duty. Arrangements between passengers and stewards or other members of the crew are not binding on the Company. For hand baggage the Company will assume no responsibility.

Passengers are reminded that the porters on the New York piers are not allowed to ask for gratuities in consideration of the handling of passengers' baggage, they being paid sufficient wages for their services. If., nevertheless, any porter should demand payment for handling such baggage, passengers are requested to note the number plate on his cap and to report him to one of the uniformed policemen on the pier.

STEAMER CHAIRS AND RUGS. Upon application to the deck stewards, steamer chairs and rugs can be rented during the voyage, at a charge of $1.— each. Places for steamer chairs are assigned by the deck steward.

MEALS:

  • Breakfast at 8:00 am
  • Lunch at 12 noon.
  • Supper at 6:00 pm

Also: Coffee and Cake at 3:00 pm and Sandwiches at 9:30 pm

SMOKING ROOM. The smoking room is open from early morning until 12 midnight. Smoking is prohibited in the social rooms and the staterooms as well as in the passageways below deck.

HOT AND COLD BATHS. The bathrooms on board may be used by the passengers for hot or cold baths at any time of the day; for their use please apply to the bathroom steward or stewardess. Passengers using the baths on board our vessels do so entirely at their own risk and at their own responsibility.

The Hamburg America Line do not hold themselves in any way liable for any damage, injury or accident that may be caused by such use.

STATEROOM PORTHOLES. In order to avoid accidents, passengers are requested not to open or close the portholes in their staterooms, but to ask their Room Steward to do so.

LIBRARY. The books in the library may be obtained upon application to the library steward, and are at the disposal of passengers free of charge. A list of such books is kept by the library steward. Passengers are requested not to leave books lying on deck or in the social rooms.

MUSIC. The orchestra plays daily for I hour either in the forenoon or in the afternoon, and also for 2 hours in the evening either for concert or dancing.

AMUSEMENTS. Requisites for games such as Shuffle Board, Dominoes, Chess, Quoits, etc., are at the disposal of passengers.

Moving pictures are shown several times during the trip.

BARBER. The barber is authorized to charge for his services according to the tariff fixed by the Company. The price list will be found in the barber's shop.

ATTENDANCE. Passengers are requested to bring any complaints to the notice of the Chief Steward, and, if the complaint is not promptly in vestigated, to apply to the Purser or to the Captain.

IMPORTED PLANTS AND SOIL ETC. PROHIBITED. The United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, advises under "Notice of Quarantine No. 37," that plants, soil or other similar materials cannot be imported into the United States, either as souvenirs or in any other category.

Source: SS Deutschland Passenger List - 22 August 1930

 

Information for Passengers - 15 August 1935

New York Mail for Passengers. The New York Office of the Hamburg America Line/North German Lloyd has made arrangements that mail addressed to Passengers arriving in New York may be obtained at the principal exit on the upper floor of the Pier. This only applies to such letters, etc., that arrive too late to be delivered to Passengers on board during their stay at the quarantine station.

Landing Card. On arrival in New York the "Landing card" attached to your ticket is to be handed to the Immigration Officer for endorsement. First-class Passengers will receive the landing cards by the purser during the voyage.

New York Porter Service. Passengers are reminded that the porters on the New York piers are not allowed to ask for gratuities in consideration of the handling of Passengers' baggage, they being paid sufficient wages for their services. If, nevertheless, any porter should demand payment for handling such baggage, Passengers are requested to note the number plate on his cap and to report him to one of the uniformed policemen on the pier.

In addition, Passengers are earnestly advised to direct their enquiries concerning baggage or passage matters exclusively to persons who, by their uniforms, are plainly seen to be Hapag employees. Failing this precaution, they expose themselves to the risk of being taken advantage of by unauthorized persons.

Passengers proceeding to interior Destinations. Wireless advance bookings of Pullman, sleeping and parlor car accommodation for the journey from New York to places situated in the interior may be effected on board through the intermediary of the Purser.

Sailing Permits for Non-Americans. Non-Americans (including visitors to the United States who intend a temporary stay only) must obtain, prior to their departure from the United States, a Sailing Permit, which must be produced previous to going on board, when the final passage ticket is examined. Such Sailing Permits are issued at the Custom House, Battery, New York.
Further information will be gladly given by the Hamburg America Line/ North German Lloyd, 57, Broadway, New York.

Imported Plants and Soil etc. Prohibited. The United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, advises uthder "Notice of Quarantine No. 37," that plants, soil or other similar materials cannot be imported into the United States, either as souvenirs or in any other category.

Advance Reservations of Automobiles. The Hamburg America Line has made arrangements with the Pennsylvania Cadillac Motor Service, New York, whereby private limousines may be ordered by wireless to our New York piers for arrival of our ships. Information as to rates and all other details are obtainable at the Tourist Department of the Hamburg America Line on board.

Tourist Department
of The Hamburg-Amerika Linie
On the A-Deck of the S. S. DEUTSCHLAND

an Office of the Tourist Department has been established. This Office furnishes information to Passengers concerning the sailings of the steamers, the railway services from port of arrival to the interior, the air service and all other arrangements of the Hamburg-Amerika Linie. It also provides information with regard to customhouse and passport arrangements and other matters which are of importance to travelers. At the Office tickets are issued for railroads and steamers to all parts of the world.

Safety regulations. Life preservers ready for immediate use are to be found at the top end of the beds in all cabins. They are put on like ordinary jackets and are tied together at the neck and across the body. The danger signal for Passengers consists of seven short and one long blast of the steam-whistle. Upon this signal Passengers proceed to the assembly places indicated in public notices on board. From here they are conducted to the boats by their room stewards under supervision of the officer in charge.

Source: SS Deutschland Passenger List - 15 August 1935

 

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