SS New York Archival Collection

 

 

Raising the American Flag on the SS New York on 22 February 1893.

Raising the American Flag on the SS New York on 22 February 1893. In War and Peace, 1898. GGA Image ID # 1dcd2e0920

 

New York (1851) Glasgow & New York Steam Ship Co.

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,962. Dimensions: 262' x 36'. Single-screw, 10 1/2 knots. Masts and Funnels: Single funnel. Iron hull. Maiden voyage: Glasgow-New York, September 16, 1851. Speed Records: Made a fast Atlantic crossing for that date, of 12 days, 5 hours on the eastward course. Ownership Change: Sold to Inman Line in 1859. Fate: Destroyed by fire off Nantucket, July 31, 1865.

 

New York (1858) North German Lloyd

Built by Caird & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,674. Dimensions: 318' x 40'. Propulsion: Single-screw, 10 1/2 knots. Inverted type engines. Masts and Funnels: Three masts and one funnel. Clipper bow. Iron hull. Passengers: 60 first, 110 second, 400 third. Maiden voyage: Bremen-New York, August 14, 1858. Ownership Change: Sold to British owners in 1873. Modifications: Converted to sailing ship. Fate: Wrecked in 1891. Running mates: Bremen (identical), Hudson and Weser.

 

New York (1888) American Line

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 10,499. Dimensions: 528' x 63' (560' o.l.). Propulsion: Twin-screw, 20 knots. Masts and Funnels: Three masts and three funnels. Steel hull. Clipper bow. First voyage as New York Southampton-New York, March 11, 1893. Refit: New triple expansion engines installed in 1903. Reduced to two funnels. Renamed: (a) Harvard (1898), (b) New York (1899), (c) Plattsburg (1917) United States Government, (d) New York (1919) American Line. Liner sold to Polish Navigation Company in 1921. Fate: Scrapped at Genoa in 1923. Previous Names: City of New York (1893). Sister ship: Philadelphia.

 

New York (1922) Greek Line

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 16,991. Dimensions: 552'x 70' (578'o.l). Propulsion: Twin-screw, 16 knots. Steam turbines. Masts and Funnels: Two masts and one funnel. Passengers: 73 first, 1,173 tourist. Service: Bremerhaven-New York. Fate: Vessel laid up in 1960. Previous Names: Ex-Nea Hellas (1955), ex-Tuscania (1939).

 

The SS New York, SS Hamburg, SS Albert Ballin, and SS Deutschland.

The SS New York, SS Hamburg, SS Albert Ballin, and SS Deutschland. 11,500 Tons -- 633 Feet Long -- 79 Feet Wide -- Twin Screw Turbine -- Oil Burning -- 13,000 Horsepower. Across the Atlantic - First Class - Hamburg American Line Brochure, 1928. GGA Image ID # 11c121779b

 

New York (1927) Hamburg-American Line

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 21,455. Dimensions: 602' x 72'. Propulsion: Twin-screw, 16 knots. Steam turbines. Two masts and two funnels. Maiden voyage: Hamburg-Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, May 13, 1927. Speed was increased to 20 knots by having new steam turbines installed in 1930. Note: Lengthened to 645 feet (23,337 tons) in 1934. Fate: Bombed and sunk by air attack at Kiel, April 3, 1945. Refloated and towed to Great Britain in 1949; subsequently broken up for scrap. Sister ship: Hamburg.

 

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Front Cover, Saloon Class Passenger List for the 3 June 1993 Voyage of the SS New York of the American Line.

1893-06-03 SS New York Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: Saloon
  • Date of Departure: 3 June 1893
  • Route: Southampton to New York
  • Commander: Captain John C. Jamison

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, August 1893 Westbound Voyage - SS New York

1893-08-19 SS New York Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: Second Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 19 August 1893
  • Route: Southampton to New York
  • Commander: Captain John C. Jamison

 

29 September 1896 Passenger Manifest - SS New York

1896-09-29 SS New York Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: Saloon
  • Date of Departure: 29 September 1896
  • Route: Southampton to New York
  • Commander: Captain F. M. Passow

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, November 1896 Westbound Voyage - SS New York

1896-11-09 SS New York Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: Second Cabin
  • Date of Departure: 9 November 1896
  • Route: Southampton to New York
  • Commander: Captain F. M. Passow

 

12 August 1899 Passenger Manifest - SS New York

1899-08-12 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: American Line

Class of Passengers: Saloon

Date of Departure: 12 August 1899

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain W. J. Roberts

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, September 1900 Westbound Voyage - SS New York

1900-09-08 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: American Line

Class of Passengers: Second Cabin

Date of Departure: 8 September 1900

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain W. J. Roberts

 

February 1904 Westbound Voyage - SS New York

1904-02-27 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: American Line

Class of Passengers: First Class

Date of Departure: 27 February 1904

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain F. M. Passow

 

Front Cover - 23 September 1905 Passenger List, SS New York, American Line

1905-09-23 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: American Line

Class of Passengers: First Class

Date of Departure: 23 September 1905

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain W. J. Roberts

 

Front Cover of a Second Class Passenger List from the SS New York of the American Line, Departing Saturday, 11 August 1906 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

1906-08-11 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: American Line

Class of Passengers: Second Class

Date of Departure: 11 August 1906

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain W. J. Roberts

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, August 1910 Westbound Voyage - SS New York

1910-08-27 SS New York Passenger List

Class of Passengers: First Class

Steamship Line: American Line

Date of Departure: 27 August 1910

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain W. J. Roberts

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, September 1911 Westbound Voyage - SS New York

1911-09-02 SS New York Passenger List

  • Steamship Line: American Line
  • Class of Passengers: First Class
  • Date of Departure: 2 September 1911
  • Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg
  • Commander: Captain W. J. Roberts

 

Front Cover of a Third Class Passenger List for the SS New York of the Hamburg America Line, Departing 16 January 1929 from Hamburg to New York

1929-01-16 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Third Class

Date of Departure: 16 January 1929

Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Captain Graalfs

 

Passenger Manifest - Hamburg Amerika Linie - New York 1929-04-05

1929-04-05 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Cabin

Date of Departure: 5 April 1929

Route: Hamburg to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Captain Graalfs

 

1931-05-21 Passenger Manifest of SS New York

1931-05-21 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 21 May 1931

Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Graalfs

Note: This passenger list did not state which class of passengers were listed. We believe there were two classes involved, most likely Tourist and the Third Class.

 

1931-10-08 Passenger Manifest of SS New York

1931-10-08 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Third Class

Date of Departure: 8 October 1931

Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Graalfs

Note: Included 46 Senior Officers and Staff.

 

1933-07-27 Passenger Manifest of SS New York

1933-07-27 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: First, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 27 July 1933

Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore Kruse

Note: 46 Senior Officers and Staff Listed.

 

1933-08-24 Passenger Manifest of SS New York

1933-08-24 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Tourist

Date of Departure: 24 August 1933

Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore Kruse

Note: 46 Senior Officers and Staff Members Listed.

 

1934-08-09 Passenger Manifest for the SS New York

1934-08-09 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: First and Tourist Class

Date of Departure: 9 August 1934

Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton, Cherbourg, and Cobh (Queenstown)

Commander: Commodore Kruse

Note: 47 Senior Officers and Staff Listed.

 

1934-09-06 SS New York

1934-09-06 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg-Amerika Linie / Hamburg America Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: First and Tourist Class

Date of Departure: 6 September 1934

Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore Kruse

Note: 47 Senior Officers and Staff Members Listed.

 

1936-05-28 SS Hamburg

1936-05-28 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 28 May 1936

Route: New York to Hamburg via Cherbourg and Southampton

Commander: Captain J. Wagner

Note: 47 Senior Officers and Staff Members Listed.

 

1938-11-03 SS New York

1938-11-03 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist, and Third Class

Date of Departure: 3 November 1938

Route: Hamburg to New York via Southampton, Cherbourg, and Cobh

Commander: Captain B. Majewski

 

Front Cover, Hamburg American Line SS New York Cabin, Tourist, and Third Class Passenger List - 11 May 1939.

1939-05-11 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg American Line

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist, and Third Class

Date of Departure: 11 May 1939

Route: New York to Hamburg via Cherbourg and Southampton

Commander: Captain B. Majewski

 

1939-06-08 Passenger Manifest for the SS New York

1939-06-08 SS New York Passenger List

Steamship Line: Hamburg Amerika Linie / Hamburg American Line (HAPAG)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 8 June 1939

Route: New York to Hamburg via Cobh, Cherbourg, and Southampton

Commander: Captain B. Majewski

 

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Deck Plan of the SS St.Louis and the SS St. Paul of the American Line.

1901-04-22 American Line First Cabin Services

1901 Brochure covers First Cabin Travel on the Steamships of the American Line and includes Deck Plans, Rates for Transatlantic Travel (Southampton - New York Service via Cherbourg) and General Passenger Information. Ships Covered: St. Louis, St. Paul, and New York.

 

American Line Southampton -- New York Service with Tariff of First Class Fares.

American Line Southampton to New York Service - 1908

Broadside Flyer produced by the American Line promoting their Southampton - New York service. Includes information for passengers, the tariff of first-class fares, and deck plans for the SS St. Louis, SS St. Paul, SS New York, and the SS Philadelphia.

 

Covers for the 1928 Hamburg American Line Brochure Across the Atlantic - First Class.

HAPAG - Across the Atlantic in First Class - 1928

Outstanding brochure from the Hamburg America Line captures the opulence of first-class transatlantic travel in the late 1920s. Rare interior photographs of public rooms such as the shopping plaza or promenade make this an excellent booklet. Ships Featured: Resolute and Reliance, New York, Hamburg, Albert Ballin, and Deutschland.

 

Front Cover for a Joint Line Brochure from Hamburg America Line and North German Lloyd Entitled Go Tourist Class.

HAPAG-North German Lloyd - Go Tourist Class - 1936

26-Page Brochure "Go Tourist Class" is a joint production of HAPAG-NDL. Profusely Illustrated with interior photographs of Tourist Class accommodations and ships of both lines that carried passengers of that class. A superb brochure produced for American tourist of the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany. Bremen, Europa, Columbus, Berlin, New York, Hamburg, Deutschland, Hansa, and St. Louis.

 

Front Cover of 1937 Brochure from the Hamburg-American and North German Lloyd on their Transatlantic Ships.

1937-10 HAPAG-NDL Ships in the Transatlantic Service

14-page small format brochure produced jointly by HAPAG-LLOYD welcomes you to Germany in 1937 on their transatlantic ships Bremen, Europa, Columbus, New York, Hamburg, Hansa, Deutschland, St. Louis, and Berlin. Brief information along with a photograph of each ship is included in this booklet.

 

Titelblatt, Hamburg America Line 1938 Broschüre "In der dritten Klasse nach Nordamerika."

In der Dritten Klasse nach Nordamerika - 1938

Es handelt sich um eine gut erhaltene Broschüre veröffentlicht wurde, dass vor dem Beginn des europäischen Konflikt, der sich aus dem Zweiten Weltkrieg. Superb Fotografie macht dies ein Rekord excecptional der dritten Klasse Unterkünfte auf dem Dampfer Deutschland, New York, Hamburg und die Hanse.

 

Titelblatt, Hamburg America Line 1938 Broschüre "In der dritten Klasse nach Nordamerika."

In The Third Class to North America - 1938

This is a well-preserved brochure that was published before the beginning of the European conflict that became World War II. Superb photography makes this an exceptional record of the Third Class accommodations on the steamships Deutschland, New York, Hamburg, and the Hansa. Translated from the German Text.

 

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D. New York, Vorderseite, Passagiervertrag 3. Klasse Hamburg-Amerika Linie, 16. September 1927.

D. New York Beförderungsvertrag - 16. September 1927

Deutscher Vertrag über das Dampfflugzeug der dritten Klasse an Bord der SS New York der Hamburg-Amerika-Linie im Jahr 1927. Die Unterschrift des Passagiers ist schwer zu lesen.

 

D. New York, Vorderseite, Passagiervertrag 3. Klasse Hamburg-Amerika Linie, 16. September 1927.

SS New York Passage Contract - 16 September 1927

Emma Muessigbrodt, a 37 year-old German woman traveling from Hamburg to New York on the SS New York of the Hamburg America Line. She travelled in the Third Class. English Translation from the German Text.

 

Hamburg America Line Receipt for Part-Payment for Third Class Passage on the SS New York

SS New York and SS Bremen Passage Receipt - 22 February 1936

Receipt for partial payment for third class passage on the SS New York - Eastbound and the SS Bremen - Westbound for a round-trip voyages between New York and Bremen on the Hamburg America Line.

 

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Front Cover, SS NewYork Farewell Dinner Bill of Fare Postcard - 30 June 1928

1928-06-30 SS New York Farewell Dinner Menu

Vintage Farewell Dinner Bill of Fare Post Card from 30 June 1928 on board the SS New York of the Hamburg America Line featured Fried Filet of Perch Pike, Roast Duckling, and Mixed Ice Cream for dessert.

 

Front Cover, Anniversary Dinner Menu, Hamburg American Line, SS New York, 18 July 1937

1937-07-18 SS New York Anniversary Dinner Menu

This Anniversary Dinner Bill of Fare celebrates the 90th Anniversary of the Founding of the Hamburg America Line (1847-1937). The Bill of Fare featured Eggs with Caviar, Boiled Turbot with Sauce Romain and Tournedos with Potato Croquettes. A Music Program is on the Back Cover.

 

Front Cover, Lunch and Dinner Menu, Tourist Class on the TSS New York of the Greek Line, Wednesday, 21 August 1957.

1957-08-21 TSS New York Lunch and Dinner Menu

Vintage Tourist Class Lunch and Dinner Menu from Wednesday, 21 August 1957 on board the TSS New York of the Greek Line featured Szegedin Paprika Gulyas, Braised Haunch of Beef à la Mode, and Ice Cream for dessert.

 

Front Cover, Luncheon Menu, Tourist Class on the TSS New York of the Greek Line, Saturday, 24 August 1957.

1957-08-24 TSS New York Luncheon Menu

Vintage Tourist Class Luncheon Menu from 24 August 1957 on board the TSS New York of the Greek Line featured Lamb and Savoy Cabbage Stew Bourgeoise, Chopped Steak with Sauce Robert, and Ice Cream for dessert.

 

Front Cover, Farewell Dinner Menu, Tourist Class on the TSS New York of the Greek Line, Saturday, 24 August 1957.

1957-08-24 TSS New York Farewell Dinner Menu

Vintage Dinner Menu from 24 August 1957 on board the TSS New York of the Greek Line featured Poached Deep Sea Scallops Creole, Sirloin Steak with Pan Gravy, and Stawberry Short Cake for dessert.

 

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Front Cover, Social Events Program on Board the SS New York for the Transatlantic Voyage beginning on Thursday, 27 July 1933. Lag. Nr. 568.

1933-07-27 Social Events Program - SS New York

Program of Social Events for a voyage of the SS New York of the Hamburg America Line beginning 27 July 1933. Events included Movies, Concerts, "Get-Togethers," and Dances. Two of the movies shown were self-promotional world cruises aboard a HAPAG ocean liner.

 

Front Cover, Social Events Program on Board the SS New York of the Hamburg America Line Covering the Transatlantic Voyage Beginning 11 May 1939.

1939-05-11 Social Events Program - SS New York

Social Events Program for the transatlantic voyage on the SS New York of the Hamburg America Line beginning 11 May 1939. Featured events included Tea Concerts, Horse Races, Dancing, Movies, Fancy Dress Ball, and News Reels.

 

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Track Chart on the Back Cover, Saloon Class Passenger List for the 3 June 1993 Voyage of the SS New York

Track Chart on the Back Cover, Saloon Class Passenger List for the 3 June 1993 Voyage of the SS New York of the American Line. GGA Image ID # 12ba25ecd5.

 

Track Chart on the Back Cover, Second Cabin Passenger List for the 19 August 1893

Track Chart on the Back Cover, Second Cabin Passenger List for the 19 August 1893 Voyage of the SS New York of the American Line. GGA Image ID # 12bb27d092

 

Hamburg-American Line Track Chart of the Atlantic Ocean, 1929.

Track Chart of the Atlantic Ocean, Hamburg-American Line, 1929. GGA Image ID # 177cc9384d

 

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Sailing Schedule, Southampton-New York Service, from 18 August 1896 to 30 December 1896.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-New York Service, from 18 August 1896 to 30 December 1896. Ships Included the Ohio, New York, Paris, St. Louis, and St. Paul. SS Paris Passenger List, 15 August 1896. GGA Image ID # 1e449f2aad

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-New York Service, from 8 September 1896 to 30 December 1896.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-New York Service, from 8 September 1896 to 30 December 1896. Ships Included the New York, Paris, St. Louis, and St. Paul. SS Paris Passenger List, 5 September 1896. GGA Image ID # 1e44bce4ca

 

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings to Europe, From 6 July 1927 to 5 January 1928.

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings to Europe, From 6 July 1927 to 5 January 1928. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, New York, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. Listing States Classes of Passengers Carried and the Ship's Commander. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e49d8e1bf

 

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings from Europe, From 7 July 1927 to 31 December 1927.

Hamburg-American Line Proposed Sailings from Europe, From 7 July 1927 to 31 December 1927. Ships Included the Albert Ballin, Cleveland, Deutschland, Hamburg, New York, Reliance, Resolute, Thuringia, and Westphalia. Listing States Classes of Passengers Carried. SS Albert Ballin Passenger List, 6 July 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e4a28ba52

 

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Information for Passengers - 29 September 1896

The Bar closes at 11 pm Lights are extinguished in the Saloon at 11:00 pm, and in the Smoking Room at 11:30 pm

Letters and Telegrams should be handed to the Saloon Steward within an hour after leaving Southampton, and those for dispatch upon reaching port should be handed to him an hour before arrival.

Writing Paper, Envelopes, and Telegraph Forms, will be found in the Library.

Large Deck Chairs can be obtained for use on the voyage, at a charge of 50 cents each, upon application at the Purser's Office, or to the Deck Steward.

The Company will not be responsible for valuables or money unless given in the charge of the Purser, and a receipt for same should be obtained from the Purser.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 29 September 1896

 

Information for Passengers - 12 August 1899

The Bar closes at 11:00 pm Lights are extinguished in the Saloon at 11:00 pm, and in the Smoking Room at 12 (midnight).

Inquiries regarding Baggage will be attended to by the Baggage Steward, to whom all Baggage which Passengers wish to leave in the Company's care should be handed, properly labelled, and with full instructions as to disposal.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 12 August 1899

 

Information for Passengers - 27 February 1904

Breakfast from 8:00 until 10:00 am Luncheon at 1:00 pm Dinner at 7:00 pm

Please apply to the Second Steward for Seats at Table.

Large Deck Chairs can be obtained for use on the voyage, at a charge of $1 each, upon application at the Purser's Office, or to the Deck Steward.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 27 February 1904

 

Information for Passengers - 23 September 1905

Meals for children are served separately.

For Railway and Steamship Time Tables of the various Companies, apply to the Saloon Steward.

Large Deck Chairs can be obtained for use on the voyage, at a charge of 4- each, upon application at the Purser's Office, or to the Deck Steward.

These steamers are fitted with the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Apparatus. The rates that are charged are—from Ship to Marconi Stations, sixpence per word; from Ship to passing steamers and thence to either Station, and vice versa, sixpence per word.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 23 September 1905

 

Information for Passengers - 27 August 1910

Large Deck Chairs can be obtained for use on the voyage, at a charge of 4/- each, upon application to the Deck Steward. Rugs can also be hired on Board at a charge of 4/-.

The Marconi Wireless Telegraph Service. Messages are accepted on board for transmission to any part of the world or for delivery on board passing ships.

The latest editions of the leading American and English papers are kept on file at the Company's new West End Offices, No. 1, Cockspur Street, London, where Passengers' baggage will also be received and stored if required.

For the convenience of Passengers the Purser is prepared to exchange a limited amount of English and American money, at the rate of $4.80 to the pound when giving American money for English Currency, or £1 per $4.95 when giving English money for American currency.

The Surgeon is authorized to make customary charges, subject in each case to the approval of the Commander, for treating Passengers at their request for any illness not originating on board the Ship. In the case of sickness developed on board no charge will be made, and medicine will be made free in all ciroumstances.

Should the Steamer arrive at the New York Wharf after 8:00 pm, Passengers may land if they wish to do so, and have their baggage passed by the Customs authorities immediately on arrival, but those who prefer to remain on board may do so, and have the whole of their baggage passed the following morning not earlier than 7 o'clock.

Breakfast will be served to those who remain on board over night.

Valuables. The American Line has provided a Safe in the office of the Purser in which Passengers may deposit Money, Jewels, or Ornaments for safe keeping. The Company will not be liable to Passengers for the loss of money, jewels, or ornaments, by theft or otherwise, not so deposited.

Insurance of Baggage, etc. Arrangements have been made whereby Passengers can have their baggage insured against loss by sea or land, including risk of fire, breakage, theft or pilferage, from the time the baggage is received by the American Line until delivery at destination. Other risks can also be insured against.

The Company strongly recommend Passengers to insure their packages whenever practicable, as in the event of loss or damage to baggage the American Line cannot under any circumstances accept any liability beyond the amount specified on their steamer contract ticket.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 27 August 1910

 

Information for Passengers - 2 September 1911

Travellers' Cheques, payable in all parts of Europe, can be purchased at all the principal offices of the Amerlcan Line., These Cheques are accepted on board American Line Steamers in payment of accounts. but the Pursers do not carry funds to enable them to cash same.

Public Telephones With Booths and Operator On Our New York Piers.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 2 September 1911

 

Information for Passengers - 16 January 1929

On the morning following the departure from Cuxhaven the steamer will call at Boulogne-sur-Mer in France, on the same afternoon at Southampton in England in order to land and embark Passengers. On the third day of the trip the ocean voyage begins.

On arrival in New York the "Landing card" attached to your ticket is to be handed to the Immigration Officer for endorsement. The baggage may be checked to the Passengers' destination after the custom inspection has taken place.

Valuables or Money. Valuables or money should not be left in the cabin, but be placed in charge of the Purser in his safe. No responsibility, however, can be accepted by the Company.

Letters and postcards written during the voyage may be left at the Purser's Office which on payment of the postage will see that they are forwarded.

Wireless telegrams are accepted by the Radio Officer on duty in the Third Class.

Physician. For medical attendance in case of sickness contracted on board no charge is made; medicines are also provided free of cost.

Steamer Chairs and Rugs. Upon application to the deck stewards, steamer chairs and rugs, can be rented during the voyage, at a charge of $ 1.— each. Places for steamer chairs are assigned by the deck steward.

Hot and Cold Baths. A number of comfortable public bathrooms are provided on board. The bathroom steward or stewardess will attend to the bath upon the passenger's request.

Music. The orchestra plays daily for 1 hour either in the forenoon, or in the afternoon, and also for 2 hours in the evening either for concert or dancing.

Amusements. A number of games such as Shuffle Board, Dominoes, Chess, Quoits, etc., are at the disposal of Passengers. Moving pictures are shown several times during the trip.

Barber. The barber is authorized to charge for his services according to the tariff fixed by the Company. The price list will be found in the barber shop.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 16 January 1929

 

Information for Passengers - 5 April 1929

Promenade Deck. In order to assure quietness throughout the ship, passengers are respectfully requested not to use the promenade deck for promenading purposes during the hours between II p. m. and 7:00 am

New York Mail for Passengers. The New York Office of the Hamburg-Amerika Linie has made arrangements that mail addressed to passengers arriving in New York may be obtained at the principal exit on the upper floor of the Pier. This only applies to such letters, etc.. that arrive too late to be delivered to passengers on board during their stay at the quarantine station.

Landing Card. On arrival in New York the "Landing card" attached to your ticket is to be handed to the Immigration Officer for endorsement.

New York Porter Service. Passengers are reminded that the porters on the New York piers are not allowed to ask for gratuities in consideration of the handling of passengers' baggage, they being paid sufficient wages for their services. If, nevertheless, any porter should demand payment for handling such baggage, passengers are requested to note the number plate on his cap and to report him to one of the uniformed policemen on the pier.

Passengers proceeding to interior Destinations. Wireless advance bookings of Pullman, sleeping and parlor car accommodation for the journey from New York to places situated in the interior may be effected on board through the intermediary of the Purser.

Differences In Time

Seeing that the sun rises in the east, it follows that all localities situated west of any chosen spot must be behind time compared with all those situated to the cast of it. If you travel from cast to west, e. g., from Hamburg to New York, you must put the hands of your watch back if you want to have the correct local time.

This time difference works out at the rate of exactly four minutes to each degree of longitude. The time used in Hamburg is called Mid-European Time and corresponds to the local time based on the fifteenth degree of eastern longitude. New York Standard Time, however, is based on the seventy-fifth degree of western longitude, so that there is a difference in geographical position amounting to ninety degrees, and a time difference of 90 times 4 minutes or exactly six hours.

When, for instance, it is noon in Hamburg, it is only 6:00 am in New York. In order to effect a gradual change from Mid-European to New York Time, it is customary on board to put all clocks and watches back a little each day, so that at the end of the voyage the difference of six hours is eliminated.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 5 April 1929

 

Information for Passengers - 8 October 1931

Landing Card. On arrival in New York the "Landing card" attached to your ticket is to be handed to the Immigration Officer for endorsement. First-class passengers will receive the landing cards by the purser during the voyage.

Sailing Permits for Non-Americans. Non-Americans (including visitors to the United States who intend a temporary stay only) must obtain, prior to their departure from the United States, a Sailing Permit, which must be produced previous to going on board, when the final passage ticket is examined. Such Sailing Permits are issued at the Custom House, Battery, New York.

Advance Reservations of Automobiles. The Hamburg America Line has made arrangements with the Pennsylvania Cadillac Motor Service, New York, whereby private limousines may be ordered by wireless to our New York piers for arrival of our ships. Information as to rates and all other details are obtainable at the Tourist Department of the Hamburg America Line on board.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 8 October 1931

 

Information for Passengers - 9 August 1934

Imported Plants and Soil etc. Prohibited. The United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Ad-ministration, advises under “Notice of Quarantine No. 37,” that plants, soil or other similar materials cannot be imported into the United States, either as souvenirs or in any other category.

A number of Cruises for Health and Pleasure are organized each year by the Hamburg America Line, enabling passengers to enjoy the beauties of Northern and Southern lands. The vessels used for this purpose are the s. s. “Oceana”—which was specially designed for a pleasure cruise steamer—and several other suitable ocean-going vessels.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 9 August 1934

 

Information for Passengers - 28 May 1936

Lifebelts ready for use, will be found at the head of the beds in the staterooms. They are put on like a coat or a vest and tied securely in front at the neck and around the waist. The signal for the passengers is seven short and one long blast of the whistle, and when this signal is sounded passengers should immediately go to the assigned meeting places, the location of which will be announced on the bulletin boards aboard the vessel. The room-stewards, under the direction of the officer in charge, will conduct the passengers from these meeting places to the lifeboats.

Baggage Insurance. Passengers who prior to sailing omitted to insure their baggage against all or any risks can still do so at moderate premium rates and favourable conditions, upon application to the purser or baggage master on board.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 28 May 1936

 

Information for Passengers - 3 November 1938

Ships' Travellers Checks.The attention of our passengers is called to the fact that in the left upper corner of the Ships' Travellers Checks the name of the passenger has immediately to be filled in. If this is not done there is the possibility that in case of thefts the cheques can easily be cashed by persons not entitled to it.

Utilization of Public Rooms. Passengers are sincerely requested to confine themselves to the public rooms, promenade decks and deck space specifically provided for the class in which they travel.

Grill Room. Special attention of Cabin passengers is directed to the Grill Room, situated on the Boat Deck. It is particularly suitable for passengers desirous of having an occasional meal in privacy or in company of friends.

Meals are served there between 8:00 am and 3:00 pm and between 6 and 9:00 pm A cover charge of RM. 1.— for lunch and of KM 2.— for dinner each person is made for meals thus served. Passengers who want to take all their meals in the Grill Room may do so on payment of a lump sum of RM. 17.50 each person for the portion Southampton/Cherbourg—New York or vice versa or RM.20.— for the portion Hamburg—New York or vice versa for half of the Roundtrip.

Deck Chairs, Travelling Rugs, etc, In addition to the seating accommodation provided on deck, comfortable deck chairs, rugs, chair cushions and pillows are available to passengers.

Animals. It is not permissible to take animals into the staterooms or to lead them about on the decks appointed for the use of passengers.

Wireless Telegraph and Telephone Services. The Wireless Station (Telefunken system) is in uninterrupted communication with the mainland and may be used for cable messages both ways. In addition, the ship is fitted with a short-wave transmitter for direct telephone messages.

Physician. An experienced physician is attached to the staff of this steamer. No charge is made for medical attendance in case of sickness on board; medicines are also provided free of cost. The ship's physician, however, is allowed to charge the usual fees to travelers who submit themselves to treatment for chronic illness or complaints not contracted during the voyage.

The Company does not hold itself responsible or liable for the nature or method of the medical treatment during the voyage nor for any consequences arising out of it.

Smoking Room. The Smoking Room is open from early in the morning until 12 midnight. Smoking is prohibited in the social rooms and the staterooms as well as in the passageways below deck.

Hot and cold Baths. The bathrooms on board may be used by the passengers for hot or cold baths at any time of the day; for their use please apply to the Room Steward or Stewardess.

Passengers using the baths on board our vessels do so entirely at their own risk and their own responsibility. The Hamburg America Line do not hold themselves in any way liable for any damage, injury or accident that may be caused by such use.

Library. The books in the Library may be obtained upon application to the Library Steward, and are at the disposal of passengers free of charge. A list of such books is kept by the Library Steward. Passengers are requested not to leave books lying on deck or in the social rooms.

Amusements. A number of games such Shuffle Board, Dominoes, Chess, Quoits, etc., are at the disposal of passengers.

Moving pictures are shown several times during the trip.

Barber. The Barber is authorized to charge for his services according to the tariff fixed by the Company. The price list will be found in the Barber's shop.

Life preservers ready for immediate use are to be found at the head of the beds in all cabins. They are put on like ordinary jackets and are tied together at the neck and across the body.

The danger signal for passengers consists of seven short and one long blast of the steam-whistle. Upon this signal passengers proceed to the assembly places indicated in public notices on board. From here they are conducted to the boats by their room stewards under supervision of the officer in charge.

Films, Chemicals, burning Articles, etc.

Any large quantities of films, chemicals and other photographic material of inflammable nature may under no circumstances be kept in the cabins. Passengers are requested to hand them to the purser on board for safe-keeping.

In order to prevent fires, our passengers are cautioned not to throw over board from decks and staterooms lighted cigar and cigarette ends, matches, etc. as they can easily be blown into a stateroom on a lower deck and cause fire there.

The ship has the most modern safety-equipments, such as a smoke-detector also fireproof and watertight hydraulic sliding doors.

German Currency. According to the German Currency Regulations putting an embargo on the import of German Banknotes and Silver Coin officials and members of the crew are prohibited from accepting German Banknotes and Silver Coin.

Passengers are therefore kindly requested to pay their bills and intended gratuities only in Ships Money Orders or in foreign currencies.

Tourist Department of the Hamburg-Amerika Linie
On the A Deck of the SS New York

an Office of the Tourist Department has been established. This Office furnishes information to passengers concerning the sailings of the steamers, the railway services from port of arrival to the interior, the air service and all other arrangements of the Hamburg-Amerika Line. It also provides information with regard to customhouse and passport arrangements and other matters which are of importance to travelers. At the Office tickets are issued for railroads and steamers to all parts of the world.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 3 November 1938

 

Information for Passengers - 11 May 1939

The Office of the Baggage Representative furnishes all information to passengers concerning baggage. To facilitate landing and to avoid unnecessary delay in Hamburg, arrangements have been made that all baggage can be dispatched on board to its destination.

An interpreter for the Hungarian and also all Slavian languages is aboard and to be found in the office of the Baggage Master. Office Hours: 9.00 - 12.00 a.m. and 4.00 -  6.00 p.m.

Passengers in possession of "Bordreiseschecks” are requested to sign their name in the upper left hand corner immediately upon receipt of the checks so that in case of loss or theft checks cannot be cashed. When cashing, the checks must be countersigned in the space provided.

Payments on board our steamers - In accordance with the German Currency Regulations placing an embargo on the importation of German Reichsmark Notes and Silver Coin, officials and members of the crew are prohibited from accepting German Reichsmark Notes and German Silver Coin. We therefore kindly request the passengers to pay their bills and intended gratuities only in Ship’s Money Orders or in foreign currencies.

DECK CHAIRS, TRAVELLING RUGS, ETC.

In addition to the seating accommodation provided on deck, comfortable deck chairs, rugs, chair cushions and pillows are available to passengers. They may be hired, for the duration of the passage, at the following rates:

Cabin Class / Tourist Class / Third Class

  • Deck Chairs           $1.50  / $1.— / $1.—
  • Woolen Rugs          $1.50  / $1.— / $0.50
  • Chair Cushions       $1.—  / $1.— / $0.50
  • Pillows                    $ 0.50 / $0.50 / Not available

Apply to the deck stewards.

The Twin-screw- steamer "New York” is scheduled yearly on Short and Long West Indies Cruises visiting the most remarkable places of the Caribbean.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 11 May 1939

 

Information for Passengers - 8 June 1939

Every Thursday, in summer and winter, one of the "Famous Four” sails from Hamburg via Southampton and Cherbourg to New York while another one returns from New York via Cherbourg and Southampton to Hamburg. Each of these ships can accommodate about 1,000 passengers in Cabin, Tourist and Third Class. Besides the four ships of the "Hamburg” type, the twin-screw motorship "St. Louis” of 16,732 Gross Register Tons is also engaged in the New York Service.

Source: SS New York Passenger List - 8 June 1939

 

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Tariff of First Cabin Fares from Southampton to New York for the Twin Screw Steamships "St. Louis" and "St. Paul."

Tariff of First Cabin Fares from Southampton to New York for the Twin Screw Steamships "St. Louis" and "St. Paul." GGA Image ID # 11446c767f. Click to View Larger Image.

 

Tariff of First Cabin Fares from Southampton to New York for the SS New York.

Tariff of First Cabin Fares from Southampton to New York for the SS New York. GGA Image ID # 114478110a. Click to View Larger Image.

SERVANTS berthed in First Cabin at £10 except between 1st August & 3rd November from Southampton, when rate is £15.

Minimum deposit to secure berth £5, or one-fourth the Passage Money when fare exceeds £20. Balance of Passage Money must be paid at latest day before sailing.

Round Trip Tickets are issued at a Reduction of 10 per cent. on the combined outward and homeward fares, except on £10 Rate.

If Tickets issued at lower Rates are used during the periods when higher rates are in force, they are subject to payment of difference in fare.

The Company reserves the right to alter Rates or Passage without notice.

Large Deck Chairs can be secured, the Charge for which will be $1 for the voyage.

 

Tariff of First-Class Fares Between London, Southampton, Paris, Cherbourg and New York

Tariff of First-Class Fares Between London, Southampton, Paris, Cherbourg and New York. From Southampton. Calling Westbound at Cherbourg. To Southampton. Calling Eastbound at Cherbourg. Twin Screw Steamer "New York." - 1908. GGA Image ID # 1149c49739

 

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Deck Plan of the SS New York of the American Line.

Deck Plan of the SS New York of the American Line. Dated 22 April 1901. GGA Image ID # 1144b3ec35. Click to View Larger Image.

 

Deck Plan of American Line United States Mail Twin Screw Steamer "New York"

Deck Plan of American Line United States Mail Twin Screw Steamer "New York" of 10,799 Tons. Diagram of Promenade, Saloon, Upper, and Main Decks. Dated 27 January 1908. GGA Image ID # 11497f6b68

 

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Departure of the SS New York of the Hamburg-American Line.

Departure of the SS New York of the Hamburg-American Line. GGA Image ID # 177b7ef8da

 

Corner Of Third Class Dining Room On The SS New York.

Corner Of Third Class Dining Room On The SS New York. GGA Image ID # 177bf843e5

 

Third Class Smoking Room On The SS New York.

Third Class Smoking Room On The SS New York. GGA Image ID # 177c36f2b5

 

Third Class Ladies Saloon On The SS New York.

Third Class Ladies Saloon On The SS New York. GGA Image ID # 177c6e8a64

 

Third Class Bath And Stateroom on the SS New York.

Third Class Bath And Stateroom on the SS New York. GGA Image ID # 177c482bd7

 

View Of The Skyscrapers In Manhattan New York On Approach To Pier.

View Of The Skyscrapers In Manhattan New York On Approach To Pier. GGA Image ID # 177b939b55

 

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First Class Ladies' Salon.

First Class Ladies' Salon—Showing Portrait by Well-Known Artist Prof. Leopold Schmutzler of Mrs. James J. Walker, Wife of Mayor of New York and Sponsor of the S.S. New York. Across the Atlantic - First Class - Hamburg American Line Brochure, 1928. GGA Image ID # 11c442d690

 

Shopping Promenade on the SS New York.

Shopping Promenade on the SS New York. Across the Atlantic - First Class - Hamburg American Line Brochure, 1928. GGA Image ID # 11c4a61329

 

The SS New York of the Hamburg America Line.

The SS New York of the Hamburg America Line. Go Tourist Class - Hamburg American Line and North German Lloyd Brochure, 10 February 1936. GGA Image ID # 125fc81ee2

 

Tourist Class Lounge on the SS New York.

Tourist Class Lounge on the SS New York. Go Tourist Class - Hamburg American Line and North German Lloyd Brochure, 10 February 1936. GGA Image ID # 12602d82ec

 

The Band Plays and Passengers Dance in the Tourist Class Social Hall on the SS New York.

The Band Plays and Passengers Dance in the Tourist Class Social Hall on the SS New York. Go Tourist Class - Hamburg American Line and North German Lloyd Brochure, 10 February 1936. GGA Image ID # 1260b93af7

 

Elegant Tourist Class Social Hall on the SS New York.

Elegant Tourist Class Social Hall on the SS New York. Go Tourist Class - Hamburg American Line and North German Lloyd Brochure, 10 February 1936. GGA Image ID # 12610e5d00

 

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Tourist Class Smoking Room on the SS New York.

Tourist Class Smoking Room on the SS New York. Go Tourist Class - Hamburg American Line and North German Lloyd Brochure, 10 February 1936. GGA Image ID # 12620b92a4

 

Young Couple Enjoying Their Days Afloat on the MS New York.

Young Couple Enjoying Their Days Afloat on the MS New York. Go Tourist Class - Hamburg American Line and North German Lloyd Brochure, 10 February 1936. GGA Image ID # 126297cdb8

 

HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE EXPRESS S.S. NEW YORK.

HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE EXPRESS S.S. NEW YORK. Cabin Class, Tourist Class, Third Class. Tonnage 22,337. Length 640. Breadth 79. Built 1927. No. Decks 8. Ships in the Transatlantic Service, October 1937. GGA Image ID # 12741dac51

 

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Advertisement for 31 Day, 1911 Cruise on the Ss New York of the American Line.

Advertisement for 31 Day, 1911 Cruise on the Ss New York of the American Line. Itinerary Includes the West Indies, Venezuela, Curacao, Panama, Colon, and More. The Ship Is Leaving New York, Saturday, 28 January 1911 and Saturday, 4 March 1911. RMS Teutonic Passenger List, 14 September 1910. GGA Image ID # 1ed1ba580b

 

Hamburg-American Line Advertisement, SS Cleveland Passenger List, 7 June 1930.

Hamburg-American Line Advertisement, SS Cleveland Passenger List, 7 June 1930. Faster across the Atlantic, without Sacrificing Their Smooth and Steady Passage, the Steamships Albert Ballin, Deutschland, Hamburg, and New York Have Been Equipped with New Turbines, Enabling Them to Cross the Atlantic to and from New York in 7 Days. GGA Image ID # 2067a1ad01

 

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Front Cover, Era of the Passenger Liner by Nicholas T. Cairis. Published by Pegasus Books Ltd., London, 1992.

Era of the Passenger Liner - 1992

The Gilded Era comes back to life as the reader relives the careers of stately ships and express greyhounds from immigrant ships to floating palaces. Scarce, large format book containing 288pp. Features photographs, statistics, and background of 280 passenger liners, each with a picture.

 

Front Cover, The Fabulous Interiors of the Great Ocean Liners, 1984.

The Fabulous Interiors of the Great Ocean Liners - 1984

Some 200 superb photographs—in long shots and close-ups—capture exquisite interiors of world's great "floating palaces"—1890s to 1980s: Titanic, Île de France, Queen Elizabeth, United States, Europa, more. Informative captions provide key details.

 

Front Cover, The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs, 193 Views, 1897-1927.

The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs - 1983

Sumptuous volume recalls the glorious early years of elegant transatlantic travel. Over 190 historic photographs depict exterior and interior views of 101 great ocean liners, including the Virginian, Imperator, Vaterland, Bismarck, Lusitania, Mauretania, Balmoral Castle, Titanic, Olympic, Aquitania and dozens more. Full captions.

 

Front Cover, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 1: 1858-1912 by Arnold Kludas, Translated from the German by Charles Hodges, 1975.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1858-1912

This initial volume deals with Ships from 1858-1912, from the first passenger ship of over 10,000 GRT to be placed in service (the Great Eastern) to those unforgettable sister ships, the Olympic and Titanic — the first of more than 40,000 GRT.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 2: 1913-1923 by Arnold Kludas, 1976.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1913-1923

The period 1913-1923 is dealt with in this second volume. Although it was only a decade, it was one of the most turbulent passenger ships in history. Competition to produce ever-larger vessels declined between leading North Atlantic shipping companies. For 20 years, the ships of the Imperator Class were the largest in the world.

 

Front Cover, Legacy of the White Star Line: History of the Titanic, Her Sisters, and Other White Star Liners by Timothy PD Turner, 2000.

Legacy of the White Star Line: History of the Titanic, Her Sisters, and Other White Star Liners

The Titanic disaster has fascinated the world since she sank, losing over 1,500 lives in April 1912. This copiously illustrated book considers much more than its title suggests, beginning with an overview of the White Star Line's fleet.

 

Front Cover,  Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 2

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 2

Volume 2 picks up the LEVIATHAN saga during her monumental conversion from a troop ship to a luxury liner and carries the ship’s tempestuous life up through her first round trip as a U.S. express liner. The book finishes with the SS Leviathan's triumphant return to the Atlantic.

 

Front Cover, Lost Liners: From the Titanic to the Andrea Doria, The Ocean Floor Reveals Its Greatest Lost Ships by Robert D. Ballard and Rick Archbold with Paintings by Ken Marschall, 1997.

Lost Liners, Titanic to the Andrea Doria

Maps, charts, and diagrams make this handsome volume a valuable reference tool and a compelling evocation of that glorious era when floating palaces ruled the sea lanes.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Majesty at Sea: The Four-Stackers by John J. Shaum, Jr. and William H. Flayhart III, 1981.

Majesty at Sea: The Four Stackers

The opulent and luxurious four-funnel passenger liners, of which only fourteen have ever been built, are unsurpassed in maritime history. Built between 1897 and 1921, these great vessels vied with each other in their standards of comfort, spaciousness, and speed, and great was the rivalry between their owners.

 

Front Cover and Spine, North Atlantic Passenger Liners since 1900 by Nicholas T. Cairis, 1972.

North Atlantic Passenger Liners Since 1900

Material about the most prominent steamship companies on the Atlantic Ferry today and those that have been there for some time. Some Lines have diverse services to other oceans, seas, and continents.

 

Front Cover, Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970 by John Adams, 1993.

Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970

A history of the steam-powered passenger ship that details its story from the SS Savannah of 1819 to the SS Hamburg of 1969. It contains historical details of all civilian vessels built in the intervening years, with numerous illustrations and previously unpublished material.

 

Front Cover, Passenger Liners Of The World Since 1893 By Nicholas T. Cairis, Revised Edition With Over 200 pictures, 1979.

Passenger Liners of the World Since 1893

The author here takes a nostalgic look back to the heyday of the passenger ship, providing a brief history of 211 ships of over 10,000 tons, together with specifications and technical details of each.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Passenger Ships of the World, Past and Present by Eugene W. Smith, 1963.

Passenger Ships of the World - 1963

Passenger Ships of the World, 1963, represents an incredible resource covering passenger ships that are Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Pacific, Trans-Pacific via Panama Canal, Latin American, Africa and the Eastern Oceans, and California-Hawaii.

 

Front Cover, Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994 by William H Miller, Jr., 417 Photographs, 1995.

Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994

One of the most comprehensive pictorial references on ocean liners ever published, this superb chronicle by noted maritime historian William H. Miller, Jr., depicts and describes virtually every passenger ship of over 15,000 tons built between 1860 and the late 1900s.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of the French Line by William H. Miller, Jr., 1997.

Picture History of the French Line - 1997

This impressive pictorial reference, by noted maritime historian William H. Miller, Jr., includes a wealth of vintage photographs celebrating the legendary French Line.

 

Front Cover, The American Line: 1871-1902 by William Henry Flayhart III

The American Line: 1871-1902 (2000)

The American Tine tells the story of the first successful American steamship line after the Civil War to rival the great European transatlantic companies—an essential and glorious chapter in the history of the American Merchant Marine.

 

Front Cover and Spine Plus, The Atlantic Liners 1925-70 by Frederick Earl Emmons, 1972.

The Atlantic Liners 1925-1970

THE ATLANTIC LINERS will be cherished by all the millions of Americans who love the sea. Frederick Emmons sketches the histories of every ocean liner that sailed between the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1970.

 

Hardback Front Cover and Spine, Transatlantic: Samuel Cunard, Isambard Brunel, and the Great Atlantic Steamships by Stephen Fox, 2003.

Transatlantic and the Great Atlantic Steamships

A stirring narrative of the rapid development of the great transatlantic steamships, from paddle-wheelers to the sleek luxury greyhounds of the modern era -- and the men who designed and ran them.

 

Front Cover, U.S. Steamships: A Picture Postcard History by Frank O. Braynard with an Introduction by Wlater Cronkite, 1991.

US Steamships: A Picture Postcard History

Over many years, Postcards were collected for the message, history, and the scene. As a result of these collecting interests, we have a valuable source of information relating to many subjects, including steamships, from a historical, technical, and artistic perspective. The Postcards in this book provide a chronological history of U.S. Steamships.

 

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The International Navigation Company was incorporated on May 5, 1871. Under its charter, granted by the State of Pennsylvania, it was authorized to operate steamships between the United States and other countries.

In 1880, a weekly service between New York and Antwerp was established.

In 1886, the fleet numbered twelve steamers, aggregating 45,500 tons. That same year, the International Navigation Company purchased the Inman Line, which had maintained an uninterrupted service between New York and Liverpool since 1856.

In 1887, the Company contracted with one of the foremost English shipbuilders to construct the first two twin-screw passenger steamers designed to be practically unsinkable.

They were the largest merchant steamers and the first to have such luxurious arrangements on the promenade deck. They made their first appearance in 1888 and 1889 and were christened the City of New York and the City of Paris.

In 1893, the most important and dramatic event in the United States' maritime history was enacted. Congress passed a bill permitting the admission of the foreign-built City of New York and City of Paris to the American registry, provided their owners would build in American shipyards under the supervision of the Navy Department. Two vessels of equal tonnage and speed, ready to take the sea as auxiliary cruisers in case of war.

With these conditions, the Company faithfully complied. Contracts were closed with the Wm. Cramp and Sons Ship and Engine Building Company for the immediate construction of two steamships of 11,600 tons each, with a warranted speed of twenty knots an hour.

 

The SS New York of the American Line Arrives in New York on 9 August 1914.

The SS New York of the American Line Arrives in New York on 9 August 1914. Photo by Bains News Service. Library of Congress LCN 2014696993. GGA Image ID # 1dce9e8283

 

When these left the ways in due time, one was baptized St Louis and the other St Paul. For convenience, the names of the two British-built ships were shortened to New York and Paris, the Inman Line from New York to Liverpool ceased to exist, and the Southampton service of the American Line was inaugurated.

The raising of the American flag over the naturalized New York, which occurred on Washington's Birthday in 1893, was of national importance. Patriotic citizens by the thousand thronged the sea wall at the Battery to see President Harrison flying "Old Glory" to the breeze. At the same time, the Naval Reserves presented arms and cannons thundered forth the nation's salute from the decks of the cruiser Chicago and from the batteries of Castle William.

 

Passengers Near the Railings of All Decks as the SS New York Approaches the Pier at New York, 14 August 1914.

Passengers Near the Railings of All Decks as the SS New York Approaches the Pier at New York, 14 August 1914. Photo by Bains News Service. Library of Congress LCN 2014696994. GGA Image ID # 1dcec6550d

 

The RMS Titanic Narrowly Misses the SS New York as It Departed from Southampton on 10 April 1912.

The RMS Titanic Narrowly Misses the SS New York as It Departed from Southampton on 10 April 1912. The SS New York Was Ripped from Its Mooring by the Massive Tidal Waves Caused by the Titanic's Movement. GGA Image ID # 1dceec425d

 

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The New York and the Paris embody the finest skill and workmanship that modern marine architecture has exhibited. They are in the highest rank for comfort and rapidity of travel.

The dimensions of these vessels are:

  • Length on the waterline, 525 feet;
  • Length overall, 560 feet;
  • Breadth, 634 feet;
  • Molded depth, 42 feet ;
  • Gross tonnage, 10,800.

Siemens-Martin steel was exclusively employed in building the giant outer shell of the hull, which has a double bottom throughout. This arrangement was adopted to prevent any danger arising to the safety of the passengers should the steamer run aground.

 

Saloon Class Drawing Room on the SS New York and SS Paris of the American Line.

Saloon Class Drawing Room on the SS New York and SS Paris of the American Line. In War and Peace, 1898. GGA Image ID # 1dceefe33d

 

Each ship has 15 water-tight compartments separated by transverse bulkheads extending from the keel to the saloon deck and rising 18 feet above the load water line. These bulkheads are solid structures of great strength, containing no doors or openings of any kind so that, should an accident occur, no aperture has to be closed at the last moment, and each section is complete.

Three water-tight compartments are set apart for the boilers and one for the engines. The latter space is further divided by a longitudinal bulkhead so that the machinery is duplicated in the strictest sense of the term.

 

First Class Dining Saloon on the SS New York and SS Paris.

First Class Dining Saloon on the SS New York and SS Paris. In War and Peace, 1898. GGA Image ID # 1dcf3d5e34

 

The first cabin passengers are housed in the three water-tight compartments in the central part of the vessel. Two compartments abaft are set apart for the second class passengers, while the compartments at each end are devoted to steerage passengers and cargo.

The grandest internal feature of the New York and the Paris is, beyond all doubt, the first cabin dining saloon, located forward on the saloon deck. This is an apartment of truly noble proportions. It extends almost entirely across the ship, and the arched form of the roof, with its cathedral glass center, gives a majestic outline possible under no other arrangement.

The space usually allowed between decks, even in the best passenger steamers, is about 8 feet, but in the New York and the Paris, the principal dining saloon is carried through two decks and a half, the height attained at the crown being 20 feet, while the length of arch is 53 feet and the span 25 feet.

 

First Class Library on the SS New York and SS Paris of the American Line.

First Class Library on the SS New York and SS Paris of the American Line. In War and Peace, 1898. GGA Image ID # 1dcf60bf1c

 

In this handsome chamber, accommodation was provided initially for 260 passengers, but alterations have recently been effected in each ship, adding a dining saloon amidships, which enables 420 persons to dine at the same time.

Well-known artists were engaged in decorating the dining saloon, and everyone will admit that they have succeeded admirably in their efforts. A white composition of peculiar ductility was used for the internal covering of the arch and the organ loft, which overlooks the saloon.

The paneling is brightened by appropriate representations of sea nymphs, dolphins, and tritons. The mythical marine company is completed by the presence of mermaids in the form of intermediate brackets.

Cozy little alcoves are ranged around the sides of the saloon, and here those who do not seek the popularity of the central tables may dine in home-like privacy. These dainty nooks have decorated panels in sycamore, with oak wainscot and maple lintels, and the appointments are en suite.

At the end of the dining saloon is the grand staircase, rising by easy treads from a spacious vestibule to the promenade deck and giving entrance to two apartments of marvelous beauty.

The first of these is the drawing room, a favorite lounge of the lady passengers, in fair weather and foul. It is adorned and appointed with exquisite taste. The ceiling is formed in deep panels, surrounded by a fretwork in gilt, and large mirrors, set in bright frames to correspond, are fixed to the apartment's walls.

An oriel window built under the stained glass dome of the dining saloon commands an excellent view of that room. The opposite gable is utilized as the organ loft, which can be approached from the promenade deck.

On the after side of the stair hall is the library, another sumptuous apartment constructed as an hourglass, thus securing the maximum of light at the maximum sacrifice of deck space. The sides of this chamber are lighted from windows overlooking the promenade deck, and a central skylight makes it exceedingly bright.

There is a lining of wainscot oak around the library. Upon the shelves are about 900 judiciously selected volumes. The names of many illustrious authors appear in carved scrolls upon the panels, while quotations from sea poems are inscribed upon the stained glass of the windows.

The first-class smoking room, 45 feet long and 27 feet wide, affords ample space for 130 gentlemen. The walls and ceiling of this room are paneled in American walnut, and the upholstery is in the figured scarlet hide.

Upon the promenade and saloon decks, at least 40 rooms are set apart in 14 suites for families who wish to have separate accommodations. Each of these suites consists of a bedroom, sitting room, private lavatory, and in most cases, a private bath. The bedrooms in these suites are fitted with single and double beds, the berths being, as in a Pullman car, closed by day and open at night.

The promenade deck extends from one end of the ship to the other, a distance of nearly 190 yards. This splendid space is always kept perfectly clear. The lifeboats hang from the davits 8 feet above the promenade, and passengers are protected by an awning deck.

So that the wishes of everybody may be consulted, the extensive area thus reserved is divided by rails running fore and aft, the inner enclosure being kept for passengers who wish to sit in the comfortable deck chairs provided, while the outer line is at all times available as a promenade.

Placed on the main deck, below the level of the grand dining saloon, and entirely isolated in an independent steel shell, without any aperture except those of the extensive ventilating shaft leading into the three great smoke stacks, is the principal kitchen literally out of sight, smell or hearing.

The second cabin dining saloon is a lovely and well-lighted apartment 27 feet long and 40 feet wide, providing seats for 150 passengers. The second cabin passengers enjoy the luxury of their own smoking room and the exclusive use of the after part of the promenade deck for the entire width of its space.

As long as they exist, they must remain a historical object lesson to those who are now too young to remember the stirring events of the recent struggle and to those who either actively or passively had an interest in it.

International Navigation Company, "Twin S.S. New York and Paris," in In War and Peace, New York: International Navigation Company, 1898, (Unpaginated).

 

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