SS Leviathan Archival Collection

 

Wheelhouse of the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines.

Wheelhouse of the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines. Library of Congress LCCN 2016892478. GGA Image ID # 1d57fe0b9b

 

 

Leviathan (1914) United States Lines

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 59,957. Dimensions: 907' x 100' (950' o.l.). Propulsion: Quadruple- screw, 24 knots. Steam turbines. Masts and Funnels: Two masts and three funnels. Note: Funnels 80 feet high from deck level. Height from keel to top of funnels 184 feet. From water line to funnel tops was 144 feet. From keel to top of mast 210 feet. First voyage as an American passenger liner was on July 4, 1923 from New York to Cherbourg and Southampton. Tonnage Shift: The tonnage of this great liner was listed as 54,282 tons gross when under German ownership. When placed under the American flag her tonnage was raised to 59,957. Finally the tonnage was registered as 48,943 under American rules of measurement. However, as a true comparative size to foreign passenger liners the 54,282 tons figure should be used. Note: served as a very valuable troopship for the United States in the First World War. Thoroughly reconditioned after the war, and during her American trials in 1923 attained a speed of 27.075 knots for one hour. Fate: The Leviathan was withdrawn from trans-Atlantic service in September 1934, and laid up. Left New York for the shipbreakers yard at Rosyth, Scotland, on January 25, 1938. Former Name: Ex-Vaterland (1917).

 

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Front Cover, SS Leviathan Passenger List - 5 August 1924

1924-08-05 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First and Second Class

Date of Departure: 5 August 1924

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R.F

Récapitulation: There were approximately 616 First Class and 500 Second Class Passengers on this voyage.

 

Front Cover, Passenger List, United States Lines SS Leviathan, 25 July 1925

1925-07-25 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: Tourist Cabin

Date of Departure: 25 July 1925

Route: New York to Southampton via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R.F

Official Voyage Designation: Souvenir Log for the United States Lines Students and Veterans Tour To Europe on the American Quadruple Screw Turbine SS Leviathan, 59,956 Tons. Voyage 28 Eastbound.

 

Front Cover, Passenger List, United States Lines, SS Leviathan, 25 August 1925

1925-08-25 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First Class and Tourist Cabin

Date of Departure: 25 August 1925

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R.F.

Superb Passenger list due to its depth of information about the passengers, activities, and the ship. The passengers on this voyage were primarily students (nearly 800 passengers listed with their home towns), plus student-written articles, poems, and a costume party with a narrative of the most unique, beautiful, etc., costumes. Students wrote much of the additional content for this expanded passenger list. View their maritime fun Student News for 1925.

 

Passenger List, United States Lines SS Leviathan 1926

1926-08-10 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First and Second Class

Date of Departure: 10 August 1926

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, USNR

 

Front Cover, First and Second Class Passenger List for the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, Departing 21 September 1926 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain Herbert Hartley, USNR.

1926-09-21 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First and Second Class

Date of Departure: 21 September 1926

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R

 

Front Cover, Passenger List, United States Lines SS Leviathan, 19 April 1927

1927-04-19 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First and Second Class

Date of Departure: 19 April 1927

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R

 

Front Cover, Passenger List, United States Lines SS Leviathan, 21 June 1927

1927-06-21 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First and Second Class

Date of Departure: 21 June 1927

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R

 

Front Cover, Passenger List, United States Lines SS Leviathan, 11 October 1927

1927-10-11 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: American Legion Passengers (Second A.E.F.)

Date of Departure: 11 October 1927

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore Herbert Hartley, U.S.N.R

Note: Passengers Who Served During World War I Were Part of the Second A.E.F. (Allied Expeditionary Force), Soldiers and Their Wives, Families, Etc.

 

Front Cover, Passenger List, United States Lines SS Leviathan, 13 March 1928

1928-03-13 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First and Second Class

Date of Departure: 13 March 1928

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain H. A. Cunningham

 

Front Cover of a First and Second Class Passenger List from the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, Departing 5 June 1928 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

1928-06-05 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First and Second Class

Date of Departure: 5 June 1928

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Captain A. H. Cunningham

 

Front Cover, Passenger List, SS Leviathan, August 1929, United States Lines

1929-08-27 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: Tourist Third Cabin

Date of Departure: 27 August 1929

Route: Southampton to New York via Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore H. A. Cunningham

 

Passenger List, SS Leviathan, United States Lines, September 1932

1932-09-09 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: Tourist Cabin

Date of Departure: 9 September 1932

Route: Bremen to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg

Commander: Commodore Albert B. Randall, U.S.N.R

Related Materials: See Tourist Cabin Contract Ticket for passenger Joan Marechal for additional information.

 

Passenger List, SS Leviathan, United States Lines, November 1932, Bremen to New York

1932-11-25 SS Leviathan Passenger List

Steamship Line: United States Lines

Class of Passengers: First Class and Tourist Cabin

Date of Departure: 25 November 1932

Route: Bremen to New York via Southampton and Cherbourg

Commander: Captain Commodore Albert B. Randall, U.S.N.R

 

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Front Cover of 1923 Brochure Introducing the Flagship of the United States Lines, the Incomparable Steamship Leviathan.

1923 - United States Lines The Steamship Leviathan

This 1923 Brochure captures the grand elegance and beauty of the World's Largest Steamship - the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines. The large photographs will allow you to envision the incredible luxury found on this very popular ocean liner.

 

Front Cover of a 1924 Brochure from the United States Lines Entitled "The American Way to Europe.

1924 - United States Lines - The American Way to Europe

Comprehensive brochure from the United States Lines developed to provide information and photographs that describe the ships and amenities geared to Americans traveling to Europe.

Also contains brief information on sites to see in European countries along with passport information. Featured Ships: America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic.

 

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Front Cover of a Vintage Farewell Dinner Menu from Sunday, 26 September 1926 on board the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines

1926-09-26 SS Leviathan Farewell Dinner Menu

Vintage Farewell Dinner Menu from Sunday, 26 September 1926 on board the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines featured Boiled Brook Trout, Sauce Niçoise, Boiled Potatoes, Roast Sirloin of Beef, Southern Style, and Pudding Milanaise, Strawberry Sauce for dessert.

 

Front Cover, SS Leviathan Farewell Dinner Menu - 10 May 1928

1928-05-10 SS Leviathan Farewell Dinner Menu

Vintage Farewell Dinner Bill of Fare from 10 May 1928 on board the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines featured Reindeer Steak, Poivrade, Plovers à la Souvaroff, and Soufflé Confiture for dessert.

 

Dinner Menu, United States Lines SS Leviathan, Private Party - 1928

1928-06-10 SS Leviathan Private Dinner Party Menu

Elaborate Private Party Dinner Menu on board the Flagship of the United States Lines, the SS Leviathan. This Sunday Dinner hosted by Mr. S. B. Applebaum featured Filet of Sole and Roast Vermont Turkey with Crème Dame Blanche. This four-page menu was bound by an elegant Red, White and Blue striped and tasseled string.

 

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Front Cover, Second Class Concert Program Given on Board the Flagship "Leviathan" on Thursday, 21 June 1928.

1928-06-21 Concert Program - SS Leviathan

Elegant Concert program and variety show for second class passengers on board the United States Lines Flagship -- the SS Leviathan. This production from Thursday, 21 June 1928 featured classical and popular music numbers, vocalists, readings, and a scene from a comedy playlet.

 

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SS Leviathan Tourist Cabin Contract Ticket, Rotterdam (Cherbourg) to New York, 10 September 1932.

SS Leviathan Passage Contract - 10 September 1932

Steamship Ticket - United States Lines, Tourist Cabin Contract Ticket, Dutch Woman, Rotterdam (Cherbourg) to New York aboard the SS Leviathan.

 

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Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 22 February 1924 to 7 June 1924.

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 22 February 1924 to 7 June 1924. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, and President Roosevelt. SS America Passenger List, 22 February 1924. GGA Image ID # 1e2d267528

 

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 27 July 1924 to 13 November 1924.

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 27 July 1924 to 13 November 1924. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS America Passenger List 27 July 1924. GGA Image ID # 1e2da1c89a

 

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 29 September 1924 to 28 January 1925.

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 29 September 1924 to 28 January 1925. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, and President Roosevelt. SS America Passenger List, 29 September 1924. GGA Image ID # 1e2e31a1b9

 

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 21 April 1926 to 29 September 1926.

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 21 April 1926 to 29 September 1926. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS President Harding Passenger List, 28 July 1926. GGA Image ID # 1eee5e7587

 

Eastbound Sailings, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 28 July 1926 to 5 November 1926.

Eastbound Sailings, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 28 July 1926 to 5 November 1926. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 10 August 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e1ca0177e

 

Westbound Sailings, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 11 August 1926 to 19 November 1926.

Westbound Sailings, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 11 August 1926 to 19 November 1926. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 10 August 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e1d0d3a92

 

Sailing Schedule, USL Steamers from New York, from 9 September 1926 to 20 December 1926.

Sailing Schedule, USL Steamers from New York, from 9 September 1926 to 20 December 1926. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Republic Passenger List, 24 September 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e59cf074f

 

Sailing Schedule, USL Steamers to New York, from 24 September 1926 to 5 January 1927.

Sailing Schedule, USL Steamers to New York, from 24 September 1926 to 5 January 1927. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Republic Passenger List, 24 September 1926. GGA Image ID # 1e5a2cd0d2

 

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 6 April 1927 to 26 August 1926.

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 6 April 1927 to 26 August 1926. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 19 April 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e1daba3bf

 

Westbound Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 20 April 1927 to 5 September 1927.

Westbound Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 20 April 1927 to 5 September 1927. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 19 April 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e1e272d88

 

Westbound Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 8 September 1927 to 15 January 1928.

Westbound Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 8 September 1927 to 15 January 1928. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 11 October 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e1f3b4d45

 

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, New York-Cobh-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 26 August 1927 to 13 January 1928.

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, New York-Cobh-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 26 August 1927 to 13 January 1928. Ships Included the George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 11 October 1927. GGA Image ID # 1e1ef6a539

 

Sailing Schedule, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 29 February 1928 to 22 June 1928.

Sailing Schedule, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 29 February 1928 to 22 June 1928. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Repubic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 13 March 1928. GGA Image ID # 1e9ee0cbea

 

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 14 March 1928 to 30 June 1938.

Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 14 March 1928 to 30 June 1938. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 13 March 1928. GGA Image ID # 1e9f06df21

 

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 20 August 1929 to 27 November 1929.

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, New York-Plymouth-Cherbourg-Bremen, from 20 August 1929 to 27 November 1929. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 27 August 1929. GGA Image ID # 1e1fbe0cd2

 

Westbound Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 4 September 1929 to 5 December 1929.

Westbound Sailing Schedule, Bremen-Southampton-Cherbourg-Cobh-New York, from 4 September 1929 to 5 December 1929. Ships included the America, America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 27 August 1929. GGA Image ID # 1e1fddf5a8

 

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, From New York to Plymouth, Cherbourg, and Hamburg, from 26 July 1930 to 23 January 1931.

Eastbound Sailing Schedule, From New York to Plymouth, Cherbourg, and Hamburg, from 26 July 1930 to 23 January 1931. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS George Washington Passenger List, 5 August 1930. GGA Image ID # 1e8781a11e

 

Westbound Sailing Schedule from Hambourg to Southampton, Cherbourg, Cobh (Queenstown), and New York, from 10 August 1930 to 6 February 1931.

Westbound Sailing Schedule from Hambourg to Southampton, Cherbourg, Cobh (Queenstown), and New York, from 10 August 1930 to 6 February 1931. Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS George Washington Passenger List, 5 August 1930. GGA Image ID # 1e877c72a1

 

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United States Lines Fleet List for Passenger and Freight Services, 1924.

United States Lines Fleet List for Passenger and Freight Services, 1924. Passenger Ships Included the America, George Washington, Leviathan, President Harding, President Roosevelt, and Republic. SS America Passenger List, 27 July 1924. GGA Image ID # 1e2dc18e1a

 

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Advertisement (1923), United States Lines / United States Shipping Board.

Advertisement (1923), United States Lines / United States Shipping Board. Ships Mentioned Include the SS Leviathan (The Largest Ship in the World), SS George Washington, SS President Roosevelt, SS President Harding. Ocean Records, May 1923. GGA Image ID # 1e67be81f5

 

Advertisement: Maxwell House Coffee Served on the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, 1923.

Advertisement: Maxwell House Coffee Served on the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, 1923. GGA Image ID # 20cfaf62ef

 

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Front Cover, Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic by Frank O. Braynard, © 1991.

Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic

An absorbing and detailed account of the three ships: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic, 50,000-ton dinosaurs of the transatlantic lines in the years before World War I.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Dry Diplomacy: The United States, Great Britain, and Prohibition by Lawrence Spinelli, 1989.

Dry Diplomacy: The United States, Great Britain, and Prohibition

American interference with international shipping--to disrupt what Presidents Harding and Coolidge deemed British alcohol smuggling--would lead to a diplomatic crisis in the mid-1920s.

 

Front Cover, Era of the Passenger Liner by Nicholas T. Cairis. Published by Pegasus Books Ltd., London, 1992.

Era of the Passenger Liner - 1992

The Gilded Era comes back to life as the reader relives the careers of stately ships and express greyhounds from immigrant ships to floating palaces. Scarce, large format book containing 288pp. Features photographs, statistics, and background of 280 passenger liners, each with a picture.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Famous Ocean Liners: The Story of Passenger Shipping from the Turn of the Century to the Present Day by William H. Miller, 1987.

Famous Ocean Liners - 1987

Here is the story of twentieth-century passenger shipping, from the first of the superliners — the German Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse — to Cunard's Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary, right up to Queen Elizabeth 2.

 

Front Cover, The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs, 193 Views, 1897-1927.

The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs - 1983

Sumptuous volume recalls the glorious early years of elegant transatlantic travel. Over 190 historic photographs depict exterior and interior views of 101 great ocean liners, including the Virginian, Imperator, Vaterland, Bismarck, Lusitania, Mauretania, Balmoral Castle, Titanic, Olympic, Aquitania and dozens more. Full captions.

 

Front Cover, The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4, by Melvin Maddocks, 1978.

The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4

A history of the world's famous luxury liners provides portraits of the ships. It examines such great disasters as the sinking of the Titanic. This edition explores the grand hotels that traversed the Atlantic between 1840 and 1930.

 

Front Cover, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 1: 1858-1912 by Arnold Kludas, Translated from the German by Charles Hodges, 1975.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1858-1912

This initial volume deals with Ships from 1858-1912, from the first passenger ship of over 10,000 GRT to be placed in service (the Great Eastern) to those unforgettable sister ships, the Olympic and Titanic — the first of more than 40,000 GRT.

 

Front Cover, Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 1

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 1

The first volume takes us from the construction of the VATERLAND to the end of World War One when the VATERLAND, now the U.S.S Leviathan, was used as a troop transport and packed with fabulous photographs and reproductions of newspaper articles.

 

Front Cover,  Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 2

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 2

Volume 2 picks up the LEVIATHAN saga during her monumental conversion from a troop ship to a luxury liner and carries the ship’s tempestuous life up through her first round trip as a U.S. express liner. The book finishes with the SS Leviathan's triumphant return to the Atlantic.

 

Front Cover, Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 3

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 3

Volume 3 picks up the LEVIATHAN saga as the ship begins transatlantic service for the United States Lines in 1923 and continues through 1926. Braynard tells the story of life aboard, prominent passengers, and her problems on a government-owned ship. There are hundreds of great photos, which makes for excellent browsing and reading.

 

Front Cover, Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 4

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 4

Volume 4 picks up the LEVIATHAN saga in 1926, during the height of the ship's popularity, and ends with the stock market crash of 1929. The ship's fortunes fell quickly after that. Hundreds of great photos, including a section of color ones, make for excellent browsing and reading.

 

Front Cover, Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 5

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 5

Volume 5 picks up the LEVIATHAN saga as the Great Depression starts with deep cuts into passenger loads. The great ship produces nothing but red ink for USL; even bargain cruises do not help. The vessel is put into lay-up and offered for sale. There are hundreds of great photos, which makes for excellent browsing and reading.

 

Front Cover, Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship," Volume 6.

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 6

The final volume picks up the LEVIATHAN saga in her last years of lay-up in Hoboken. She sailed a few voyages in 1934 but otherwise spent her final years rusting at the pier. In 1938, her old boilers were fired one last time for a slow journey to the breakers. Volume 6 contains many large photos of her abandoned interiors and a fold-out color Albert Brenet painting of the ship approaching the breakers. There are hundreds of great images, which makes for excellent browsing and reading.

 

Front Cover, Liverpool and the Mersey, Volume 1: Gladstone Dock and the Great Liners by Ken Longbottom, 1995.

Liverpool and the Mersey, Vol. 1: Gladstone Dock and the Great Liners

More than 190 rare archive photographs and maps, many never before published, recount the story of this most famous dock and the Great passenger Ships that were once a regular sight there.

 

Front Cover, Lost Liners: From the Titanic to the Andrea Doria, The Ocean Floor Reveals Its Greatest Lost Ships by Robert D. Ballard and Rick Archbold with Paintings by Ken Marschall, 1997.

Lost Liners, Titanic to the Andrea Doria

Maps, charts, and diagrams make this handsome volume a valuable reference tool and a compelling evocation of that glorious era when floating palaces ruled the sea lanes.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Majesty at Sea: The Four-Stackers by John J. Shaum, Jr. and William H. Flayhart III, 1981.

Majesty at Sea: The Four Stackers

The opulent and luxurious four-funnel passenger liners, of which only fourteen have ever been built, are unsurpassed in maritime history. Built between 1897 and 1921, these great vessels vied with each other in their standards of comfort, spaciousness, and speed, and great was the rivalry between their owners.

 

Front Cover and Spine, North Atlantic Passenger Liners since 1900 by Nicholas T. Cairis, 1972.

North Atlantic Passenger Liners Since 1900

Material about the most prominent steamship companies on the Atlantic Ferry today and those that have been there for some time. Some Lines have diverse services to other oceans, seas, and continents.

 

Front Cover, Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970 by John Adams, 1993.

Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970

A history of the steam-powered passenger ship that details its story from the SS Savannah of 1819 to the SS Hamburg of 1969. It contains historical details of all civilian vessels built in the intervening years, with numerous illustrations and previously unpublished material.

 

Front Cover, Passenger Liners Of The World Since 1893 By Nicholas T. Cairis, Revised Edition With Over 200 pictures, 1979.

Passenger Liners of the World Since 1893

The author here takes a nostalgic look back to the heyday of the passenger ship, providing a brief history of 211 ships of over 10,000 tons, together with specifications and technical details of each.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Passenger Ships of the World, Past and Present by Eugene W. Smith, 1963.

Passenger Ships of the World - 1963

Passenger Ships of the World, 1963, represents an incredible resource covering passenger ships that are Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Pacific, Trans-Pacific via Panama Canal, Latin American, Africa and the Eastern Oceans, and California-Hawaii.

 

Front Cover, Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994 by William H Miller, Jr., 417 Photographs, 1995.

Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994

One of the most comprehensive pictorial references on ocean liners ever published, this superb chronicle by noted maritime historian William H. Miller, Jr., depicts and describes virtually every passenger ship of over 15,000 tons built between 1860 and the late 1900s.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of American Passenger Ships by William H. Miller, Jr., 2001.

Picture History of American Passenger Ships - 2001

Loving tribute to luxury liners documents more than 100 ships, including the Leviathan, the America, the Independence, the President Polk, and the United States. Detailed captions provide tonnage, speed, size, and passenger load information.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of British Ocean Liners 1900 to the Present by William H. Miller, 2001.

Picture History of British Ocean Liners: 1900 to the Present

Over 200 rare black-and-white illustrations provide views of the ships at sea and in port, glimpses of lavish staterooms, lounges, dining areas, onboard photos of celebrities and royalty, and much more.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships by William H. Miller, Jr., 2002.

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships is a superbly illustrated volume that documents a long line of great ships--from "floating palaces" such as the Imperator (1913) and the Vaterland (1914) to such luxurious cruise ships as the Statendam (1957), Hamburg (1969), the remodeled Bremen (1990), and the new Deutschland (1998).

 

Front Cover and Spine Plus, The Atlantic Liners 1925-70 by Frederick Earl Emmons, 1972.

The Atlantic Liners 1925-1970

THE ATLANTIC LINERS will be cherished by all the millions of Americans who love the sea. Frederick Emmons sketches the histories of every ocean liner that sailed between the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1970.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Tourist Third Cabin: Steamship Travel in the Interwar Years by Lorraine Coons and Alexander Varias, 2003.

Tourist Third Cabin: Steamship Travel in the Interwar Years

Ocean Liners and New Vistas of Interwar Society From Immigrants to Tourists. The Changing Complexion of Translatlantic Passengers as The Soul of a Ship. Experience and Life of Below-Deck Personnel Traveling Palace or Floating Sweatshop. The Experience of Women Seafarers Projecting an Image: The Allure of MTransatlantic Travel.

 

Front Cover, U.S. Steamships: A Picture Postcard History by Frank O. Braynard with an Introduction by Wlater Cronkite, 1991.

US Steamships: A Picture Postcard History

Over many years, Postcards were collected for the message, history, and the scene. As a result of these collecting interests, we have a valuable source of information relating to many subjects, including steamships, from a historical, technical, and artistic perspective. The Postcards in this book provide a chronological history of U.S. Steamships.

 

Front Cover and Spine, When Luxury Went to Sea by Douglas Phillips-Birt, 1971.

When Luxury Went to Sea

The liners of this age served the route of gold linking Europe with the brazenly rich United States of America, where a new class of person was learning how to spend money as lavishly as any Old World rentier.

 

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Letterhead correspondence stationery with matching envelope for the most famous ship SS Leviathan of the United States Lines. (Circa 1933)

 

Matching Correspondence Letterhead and Envelope for the SS Leviathan

Stationery Set from the United States Lines. Writing paper measures approximately 5.5" by 8.5 inches Matching Letterhead envelopes. Stationery has browning and is partially degraded by previous storage environment.

 

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Information for Passengers - 5 August 1924

INFORMATION OFFICE.—This office, located amidships on “E” deck, hasbeen provided for the convenience of Passengers, and all inquiries for information of a general character should be made there.

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT REPRESENTATIVES, located in the Purser’s Office, are ready to give information concerning sailings and bookings on the UNITED STATES LINES and other services being operated by the U. S. Shipping Board steamers. Sailing lists, rate sheets, cabin plans and other information will be cheerfully furnished. Reservations can be secured and deposits to cover will be received.

LETTERS, CABLES AND TELEGRAMS are received at the Information Office for dispatch. Cablegrams and telegrams should be handed in an hour before the arrival at any port of call.

None of the ship’s employees, other than those on duty in the Information Office, are authorized to accept letters, cables and telegrams for dispatch.

The PURSER’S Office is located amidships, on “E” deck.

The CHIEF STEWARD’S Office is located amidships, on “F” deck, near entrance to main Dining Saloon.

HIGH SEAS MAIL.—United States Postage Stamps and rates are used when mailing letters, and such letters should be posted in the ship’s letter box in the ordinary way.

The mail bag is closed a few hours previous to arrival. Full particulars can be obtained at the Information Office upon application.

RADIO TELEGRAPH SERVICE

EQUIPMENT.—The radio equipment of the “Leviathan” is of the most modern R.C.A. type, manufactured especially for this ship, and embracing the latest improvements developed by the General Electric Company, the Western Electric Company and the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company.

It is the most powerful apparatus on any passenger ship afloat, capable of maintaining direct communication with land throughout the entire voyage.

SERVICE.—Radiograms may be filed at the radio office for anyone—anywhere—anytime. The words in radiograms are counted and charged for in the same manner as cablegrams.

Through the special long distance service made available by the Radio Corporation of America (RCNEWYORK), passengers can keep in close touch with business and personal affairs even though the ship is in mid-ocean.

OCEAN LETTERS.—Ocean letters, not to exceed 100 words each, may be filed for transmission to a ship proceeding in the opposite direction. Such messages are mailed to destination from the first port of call of the latter vessel. The charge is $1.20 for first twenty words and 4c. for each additional word.

NEWS SERVICE.—The “Leviathan” subscribes to the Chicago Tribune—RCA News Service, which is transmitted by the powerful radio station at Chatham, Mass. The daily despatches, consisting of from 800 to 1,000 words of the world’s latest news, results of sporting events, stock reports, etc., are received on board during the early morning hours and printed in the daily paper published and delivered to passengers.

RADIO TELEPHONE.—The “Leviathan” is equipped with a complete radio telephone transmitting and receiving outfit of the most modern duplex type. However, until other ships and shore stations are provided with similar apparatus, the telephone service is, of necessity, restricted.

SEATS AT TABLES.—Applications may be made to the Chief Steward in advance, or on day of sailing on board the Steamer at the Second Steward’s office located on “D” deck amidships, or in the Dining Room.

SMOKING.—Passengers are requested not to smoke in the Main Dining Saloon.

ORCHESTRA.—The vessel carries a first class orchestra which will play daily at the under-mentioned times and places.

  • 1:00 pm to 2.00 pm, First Class Dining Room
  • 4.0 pm to 5.00 pm, First Class Social Hall
  • 7.0 P. M. to 8.00 P. M. First-Class Dining Room
  • 9.15:00 pm to Midnight, First Class Social Hall

Musicians are not authorized to solicit contributions.

DANCING.—Dancing in the Ball Room commences every evening at 9.15 o’clock (except Sunday); weather permitting.

DECK GAMES AND AMUSEMENTS.—Deck Quoits, Shuffleboard, Bull Board and other games are provided on deck and which will be furnished by Deck Stewards.

Chess, Draughts, Dominoes, etc., can be obtained on application to the Social Hall, Library or Tea room Stewards.

SWIMMING POOE AND ELECTRIC BATHS.—The Swimming Pool is one of the leading features of the s. s. “LEVIATHAN.” The Pool will be open, without charge, for

  • Gentlemen from 6 to 9 A. M
  • Ladies from 9 to 12 Noon
  • Ladies, Gentlemen and Children 12 Noon to 7 P. M

A fully equipped Electric Bath, is located on Deck “G.” Experienced attendants are in charge.

The Electric Baths will be available for ladies from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm and for gentlemen from 2 to 7:00 pm, tickets being obtainable at the Purser’s Office at $1.25 each.

A GYMNASIUM, fully equipped with modern appliances, is located on Deck “A” and is open for ladies, gentlemen and children, as follows:—

  • Gentlemen from 6.00 am to 9.00 A.M
  • Ladies from 10.00 am to 12 Noon
  • Ladies and Gentlemen from 12 Noon to 1.00 P.M
  • Children from 2.00 pm to 3:30 pm
  • Ladies and Gentlemen from 3.30 pm to 7.00 P.M

No charge is made for the use of the appliances.

BOOKS.—Books are obtainable from the Library on deck “B” by application to the steward in charge. Books lost by passengers must be paid for.

DIVINE SERVICES.—On Sundays at hours to be announced on ship board.

BARBER, HAIRDRESSER, AND MANICURIST.—The Barber’s hours are from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm, but for the general convenience of the greater number, passengers are requested not to apply for hair-cutting or shampooing except between the hours of Noon and 5 P. M.. The Barber’s shop is located on “F” deck forward of swimming pool.

The following charges are authorized:—

  • Shaving $ .25 Face Massage $ .75
  • Haircutting 50 Scalp Massage 50
  • Shampoo, Plain .50 Tonic Dressing .25
  • Shampoo, Crude Oil 1.00
  • Manicure 1.00
  • Singeing $ .50

SPECIAL LADIES’ DEPT, for the scientific care of hair, face and nails:—

The following charges are authorized:—

  • Shampoo, Special .$2.00
  • Waving and Curling ....$1.50
  • Facial Treatment 2.00
  • Cutting and Singeing 1.50
  • Marcel Waving 1.25
  • Manicure 1.00
  • Water Waving $1.50

A CLOTHES CLEANING AND PRESSING ROOM is in charge of an expert attendant. A printed tariff of charges may be obtained at the Purser’s Office.

BOOTS AND SHOES will be cleaned if left outside stateroom door.

STENOGRAPHER.—An experienced stenographer is prepared to work for the convenience of passengers at the following charges:—

  • 5 cents per folio (72 words)
  • 2 cents per folio for Carbon copies 30 cents minimum for a letter Particulars can be obtained at the Purser’s Office.

BANKING.—FOREIGN MONEY EXCHANGE.—By arrangement with the UNITED STATES LINES, the FARMERS LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY has established on board a branch bank, which is located on the port side, “E” Deck, amidships.

Passengers wishing to exchange money, or transact other banking business, will receive every attention.

MEDICAL ATTENTION.—The Surgeon is always at the disposal of passengers requiring his services. In case of illness originating on or after the departure of the steamer, no charge will be made for services. Medicines prescribed by the Ship’s Surgeon will be furnished without charge. In case of illness, not originating on board, the Surgeon is authorized to make the following charges:—

  • For Office visits $1.00 per visit
  • For Stateroom visits $2.00 per visit
  • With a maximum charge of $4.00 per day

If passengers consider the charges made by the Surgeon for services rendered improper or excessive, they are requested, before paying same, to take up the question with the Surgeon, and the bill will be either adjusted to a basis that will be satisfactory to the passenger or withdrawn. The purpose of the UNITED STATES LINES is to make its service satisfactory to all passengers.

BERTHING OF PASSENGERS.—No charges can be made except officially by the Purser.

DECK CHAIRS AND RUGS may be hired for the voyage on application to the Deck Steward, rental $1.50 each.

VALUABLES.—The United States Lines are not responsible for theft of valuables or money kept in Staterooms. The same should be placed in charge of the Purser for deposit in his safe.

PAYMENTS.—Passengers should obtain a receipt from the Purser, on the Company’s form, for any additional passage money, excess baggage or freight charges, etc., paid on board.

PASSENGER ELEVATORS.—Four modern elevators are provided for the convenience of Cabin passengers.

NOTICE.—Passengers are warned that professional gamblers are reported as frequently crossing on Atlantic steamers.

AMERICAN CUSTOMS REGULATIONS.—On the West-bound trip, baggage will be subject to inspection on landing in America as on landing abroad.

A blank will be furnished aboard the steamer before landing which must be filled out, listing in detail every article obtained abroad. This list should be handed to the Purser and is known as your “declaration.”

An abstract of the applying U. S. Customs Regulation Law follows:—

Art. 352. Persons arriving from foreign countries.—Persons arriving from foreign countries are divided into two classes for customs purposes—first, residents of the United States returning from abroad, and, second, all other persons.

Art. 353. Residence.—The residence of a wife follows that of her husband, and the residence of a minor child follows that of its parents. Citizens of the United States, or persons who have formerly resided in the United States, shall be deemed to be residents thereof returning from abroad, within the mean-ing of the tariff act, unless satisfactory evidence is presented that they had given up their place of abode in this country and acquired an actual fixed place of abode in a foreign country.

Art. 354. Non-residents.—All persons not residents of the United States returning from abroad will be treated for customs purposes as non-residents, and are entitled to bring in free of duty all wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet articles, and similar personal effects, without limitation as to value, which were actually owned by them and in their possession abroad at the time of or prior to their departure from a foreign country which are necessary and proper for their wear and use, provided they are not intended for other persons or for sale.

Art. 355. Returning residents.—Residents of the United States returning from abroad may bring in free of duty:—

(a) Articles up to but not exceeding $100 in value acquired abroad for personal or household use, or as souvenirs or curios, if not intended for sale or purchased on commissions for other persons. Such articles purchased or agreed to be purchased abroad by returning residents may be admitted free notwith-standing they do not accompany the passenger.

(b) All wearing apparel, personal and household effects, and articles for personal use take abroad by them, if not advanced in value or improved in condition while abroad. If such effects or articles be advanced in value or improved in condition while abroad by reason of repairs or cleaning further than that necessarily incident to their wear and use while abroad, or by remodelling or alterations, the cost or value of such repairs, cleaning, remodelling, or alterations is subject to duty, and must be declared. Such cost or value may, however, be included within the $100 exemption.

Art. 356. Each member of family entitled to exemption.— Each member of the family is entitled to the exemption of $100 dor articles purchased abroad of the character described in paragraph 642 of the tariff act of October 3, 1913. When a husband and wife and minor and dependent children are traveling together the articles included within such exemption may be grouped and allowance made without regard to which member they belong.

Amended as follows:—

Par. 1695. Wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet articles, and similar personal effects of persons arriving in the United States; but this exemption shall include only •such articles as were actually owned by them and in their possession abroad at the time of or prior to their departure from a foreign country, and as are necessary and appropriate for the wear and use of such persons and are intended for such wear and use, and shall not be held to apply to merchandise or articles intended for other persons or for sale; Provided, That all jewelry and similar articles of personal adornment having a value of $300 or more, brought in by a non-resident of the United States, shall, if sold within three years after the date of the arrival of such person in the United States, be liable to duty at the rate or rates in force at the time of such sale, to be paid by such person; Provided further, That in case of residents of the United States returning from abroad all wearing apparel, personal and household effects taken by them out of the United States to foreign countries shall be admitted free of duty; without regard to their value, upon their identity being established under appropriate rules and regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury: Provided further, That up to but not exceeding $100 in value of articles acquired abroad by such residents of the United States for personal or household use or as souvenirs or curios, but not bought on commission or intended for sale, shall be admitted free of duty.

ARRIVALS AT NEW YORK. Passengers are landed at the Company’s pier No. 86, North River, foot of West 46th Street, New York, where transportation tickets can be purchased and baggage checked to any part of the United States or Canada. After landing, passengers should inquire at the desk on the wharf for letters and telegrams.

Should the steamer arrive at the pier after 8:00 pm, passengers may remain on board over night and land after breakfast the following morning.

PUBLIC TELEPHONES.—Telephone booths will be found on the pier at New York.

HOTEL RESERVATION.—Owing to the fact that hotels in New York and other large cities are so often crowded, passen-gers are invited to take advantage of facilities offered by the United States Lines for reserving rooms in advance. Application should be made to the Purser’s Office. No charge is made for this wireless service, but the land tolls are collected.

TIME ON SHIPBOARD.—Between New York and London there is a difference in time of five hours, and as the sun rises in the East, as we say, when the ship is going eastward she meets sunlight earlier each day and thus gains time. Exactly how much is computed each day at noon, and the ship’s clocks are immediately set at the correct time for that longitude. On a vessel which makes the crossing in five days the clocks will be set ahead each day approximately an hour; on slower ships, of course, less. Going westward the clock is set back daily in similar fashion.

On the voyage from Europe, owing to the alteration in time as the ship proceeds Westward, it is necessary to put the clock back every 24 hours. The alteration in time is made at about midnight, and the clock is usually put back 415 minutes on each occasion, the exact amount of time depending upon the distance the ship is estimated to make by noon the next day. During the first 24 hours, however, owing to the change from Mean Time to Apparent Time, the alteration is likely to be considerably more than 45 minutes, especially while Summer Time is in use.

NOTE.—Seven bells in these two Watches are struck 10 minutes earlier to allow the Watch next for duty to have their breakfast and dinner respectively.

One Bell is also struck at 3.45, 7.45, 11.45 am and pm as warning to Watch below, i.e., off duty, to prepare to relieve the deck punctually at Eight Bells.

Source: SS Leviathan Passenger List - 5 August 1924

 

Information for Passengers - 10 August 1926

Photographic Dark Room.—A dark room fitted with all the necessary equipment has been installed for the use of Passengers wishing to develop photographs during the voyage.

Passenger Elevators.—Four Modem elevators are provided for the convenience of Cabin Passengers.

Dogs are shipped as freight, and are carried at the Owner's risk. The Company's charge is L4 each. Arrangements for carrying the dogs should be made by communicating with the United States Lines, or if this has not been done, the Purser should be notified.

Source: SS Leviathan Passenger List - 10 August 1926

 

Information for Passengers - 21 September 1926

PASSENGERS’ QUARTERS.—First Class Passengers are not allowed to enter Second or Third Class compartments or vice versa, as complications might arise under the Quarantine Regulations.

BAGGAGE.—Passengers are requested to check their baggage at the Baggage Master’s desk on the Pier before going aboard. It is recommended that Baggage be insured as the Company’s liability is limited in accordance with Ticket. All inquiries regarding Baggage on board ship should be made at the Baggage Master’s Office, located on “ E ” Deck, amidships.

On disembarking, passengers are specially requested to claim their baggage before leaving the Customs Baggage Room, otherwise considerable delay and extra charge for carriage may be incurred in forwarding to destination any baggage not accompanying passengers.

BAGGAGE ROOM.—All baggage not placed in cabins is stowed in the Baggage Room, where access can be had to it during the voyage if required.

Source: SS Leviathan Passenger List - 21 September 1926

 

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The SS Leviathan as a Troop Transport.

The SS Leviathan as a Troop Transport. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121d32958a

 

The Lobby to the Main Saloon on "B" Deck.

The Lobby to the Main Saloon on "B" Deck. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121dfcddd7

 

Another View of the Lobby on "B" Deck. Note the Great Height and Spaciousness.

Another View of the Lobby on "B" Deck. Note the Great Height and Spaciousness. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121e36d10d

 

View of the Main Dining Saloon.

View of the Main Dining Saloon. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121e3b4fec

 

The Ritz-Carlton Restaurant Is Superbly Elegant, Rich, and Formal.

The Ritz-Carlton Restaurant Is Superbly Elegant, Rich, and Formal. In Every Line, It Represents a Masterpiece of Artistic Decoration. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121e51df02

 

The Ritz-Carlton Room.

The Ritz-Carlton Room. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121e8ac3c5

 

The Library. the Color Scheme Lends a Restful, Pleasant Atmosphere to the Room.

The Library. The Color Scheme Lends a Restful, Pleasant Atmosphere to the Room. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121efec7ea

 

The Winter Garden.

The Winter Garden. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121f03a22e

 

A Corner of the Winter Garden, with the Ritz Restaurant in the Background.

A Corner of the Winter Garden, with the Ritz Restaurant in the Background. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121f3de8d3

 

The Social Hall.

The Social Hall. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121f74b83e

 

A Corner of the Social Hall. Note the Grace and Beauty of the Old French Panelling.

A Corner of the Social Hall. Note the Grace and Beauty of the Old French Panelling. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 121fd07042

 

The Leviathan's Charming Tea-Room.

The Leviathan's Charming Tea-Room. Queen Anne in Character with Old English Color Prints by Morland and Other Celebrated Artists. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 12200407cd

 

A View of the Smoking Room Showing the Fireplace.

A View of the Smoking Room Showing the Fireplace. This Is an Early English Room of English Oak, Light and Cheerful in Color. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 12205a5bfa

 

A Painting of the Great Leviathan as Size Will Appear as a Passenger Ship Under the American Flag.

A Painting of the Great Leviathan as Size Will Appear as a Passenger Ship Under the American Flag. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 12205cc473

 

A Corner of the Smoking Room for a Pleasant Chat.

A Corner of the Smoking Room for a Pleasant Chat. The Chairs Are Leather and Tapestry Covered. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1220864095

 

The Rooms of the Leviathan Are of Varied but Unfailing Charm.

The Rooms of the Leviathan Are of Varied but Unfailing Charm. The Walls Here Are Light Gray with Light Tan Curtains. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1e205b5c2b

 

A Bedroom of a Suite.

A Bedroom of a Suite. The Walls Are a Very Light Tan, the Carpet Black and Tan, the Furniture Covering and Bedspreads a Gay Green. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1220b8eb49

 

A Corner of a Suite. This Room Is Beautifully Done in Corn Color and Mulberry.

A Corner of a Suite. This Room Is Beautifully Done in Corn Color and Mulberry. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1220be7596

 

The Sitting Room of a Suite.

The Sitting Room of a Suite. Blue Hangings and Blue Coverings on the Satin Wood Furniture Are Charming Against Corn Colored Walls. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1220dd59f5

 

Breakfast Room of One of the Premier Suites —Delightful for an Informal Morning Meal.

Breakfast Room of One of the Premier Suites —Delightful for an Informal Morning Meal. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1220fbaf1d

 

A Typical Stateroom with Fireplace.

A Typical Stateroom with Fireplace. Nothing Could Be More Charming Than This Room with Soft Gray Walls, Pomegranate Curtains and Bedspreads, Black and Beige Carpet. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1221421c4c

 

Bedroom of a Suite.

Bedroom of a Suite. The Color Scheme Is Nile Green, Gray, and Black. The Pictures Are 18th Century Color Prints. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1221b0e734

 

A Stateroom with Adjoining Bath.

A Stateroom with Adjoining Bath. Note the Spaciousness and Attractiveness of These Rooms. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1222207863

 

No Detail Either of Convenience or Beauty Is Lacking in the Rooms of the Leviathan.

No Detail Either of Convenience or Beauty Is Lacking in the Rooms of the Leviathan. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1222219fed

 

A Typical Stateroom with Bath.

A Typical Stateroom with Bath. The Walls Are Panelled in Mahogany of a Light Brown Hepplewhite Color. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 12222429b0

 

Both Luxury and Comfort in This Stately Social Hall.

The Passenger Who Elects to Travel Second Class on the Leviathan Will Discover Both Luxury and Comfort in This Stately Social Hall. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1222877d59

 

Second Class Lobby

In the Second Class Lobby Is the Same Majestic Beauty, the Same Stately Elegance That Characterizes the Rooms for First Class Passengers. The Steamship Leviathan, 1923. GGA Image ID # 1222b17326

 

Lobby and Staircase on the SS Leviathan.

Lobby and Staircase on the SS Leviathan. The American Way to Europe, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11fefd5d91

 

First Class Dining Room on the SS Leviathan.

First Class Dining Room on the SS Leviathan. The American Way to Europe, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11ff013641

 

First Class Library on the SS Leviathan.

First Class Library on the SS Leviathan. The American Way to Europe, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11ff296d77

 

Swimming Pool for First Class Passengers on the SS Leviathan.

Swimming Pool for First Class Passengers on the SS Leviathan. The American Way to Europe, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11ff2982a9

 

Deluxe First Class Stateroom on the SS Leviathan.

Deluxe First Class Stateroom on the SS Leviathan. The American Way to Europe, 1924. GGA Image ID # 11ff438e79

 

Second Cabin Social Hall on the SS Leviathan.

Second Cabin Social Hall on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 120212eca9

 

Tourist Third Cabin Dining Room on the SS Leviathan.

Tourist Third Cabin Dining Room on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 12036d0f12

 

Queen Marie of Romania, Princess Ileana, and Prince Nicholas on the SS Leviathan.

Queen Marie of Romania, Princess Ileana, and Prince Nicholas on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 1203e46c95

 

The SS Leviathan, Flagship of the United States Lines.

The SS Leviathan, Flagship of the United States Lines. GGA image ID # 12047c06fe

 

Painting of the Famous United States Lines Steamship Leviathan.

Painting of the Famous United States Lines Steamship Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11ce1f281b

 

Third Class Dining Saloon on the SS Leviathan.

Third Class Dining Saloon on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11ce4c732d

 

A Small Family Table is Available for Third Class Passengers on the SS Leviathan.

A Small Family Table is Available for Third Class Passengers on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11ce60ee15

 

Third Class Ladies' Lounge on the SS Leviathan.

Third Class Ladies' Lounge on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11cef400c0

 

Third Class Barber Shop on the SS Leviathan.

Third Class Barber Shop on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11cf76c9fb

 

A Corner of the Third Class Smoking Room on the SS Leviathan.

A Corner of the Third Class Smoking Room on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11cf84f1c2

 

Third Class Covered Deck on the SS Leviathan.

Third Class Covered Deck on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11d02cb79c

 

Spacious Third Class Upper Deck on the SS Leviathan.

Spacious Third Class Upper Deck on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11d089b32b

 

Third Class Two-Berth Stateroom on the SS Leviathan.

Third Class Two-Berth Stateroom on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 11d18024fe

 

SS Leviathan, RMS Majestic, and RMS Berengaria at Soutampton, c1927.

SS Leviathan, RMS Majestic, and RMS Berengaria at Soutampton, c1927. GGA Image ID # 1e9f8146c0

 

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How A "Dry" Ship Became "Wet" on the Atlantic Voyage

Mineral Water on the Table; Wine Below It: Hiding the Tell-Tale Bottle in the Dining-Saloon of the SS Leviathan.

Mineral Water on the Table; Wine Below It: Hiding the Tell-Tale Bottle in the Dining-Saloon of the SS Leviathan. Drawing by C. E. Turner. The Illustrated London News, 21 July 1923. GGA Image ID # 20cf2dc729

Evasion of the Prohibition Laws is regarded by many Americans as rather the sporting thing to do during a voyage to Europe. It is the easier because the " dry laws," while prohibiting the official sale of liquor, or even its carriage under seal by alien ships, does not in practice impose any search upon the luggage of embarking passengers.

For instance, many travelers on the "Leviathan," which has Just made her first trip to this country as an American passenger steamer, carried their own "stocks" of alcohol. The "safe" method oi consumption was in the privacy oí a cabin, but frequently wine was smuggled into the dining-saloon, there to be drunk in a tumbler, the rigid code of the liner not, of course, permitting a wine-glass.

Our illustration shows the officially ordered and prominently displayed bottle of table water, unopened, while, in the interval during which the glance of the steward is averted, the emptied bottle of champagne is returned to its sanctuary under the table.

On the arrival oí the ship at Southampton, the Customs of this "wet" country had occasion to seize many of the "unconsumed portions of these rations." their nature not having been "declared."

 

Sample First Class Dinner Menu on the SS Leviathan.

Sample First Class Dinner Menu on the SS Leviathan. The American Way to Europe, 1924. GGA Image ID # 1201dfa9d3

 

Passengers' Memoranda of Purchases Made on Board the Leviathan.

Passengers' Memoranda of Purchases Made on Board the Leviathan. SS Leviathan Passenger List, 27 August 1929. GGA Image ID # 1e9f418735

 

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SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, The Largest Ship in the World, c1925.

SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, The Largest Ship in the World, c1925. GGA Image ID # 1e9e867501

 

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Vintage Postcard Features Black and White Photograph of the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines. Postally Used 13 September 1927.

Vintage Postcard Features Black and White Photograph of the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines. Postally Used 13 September 1927. GGA Image ID # 1680780b51

 

Vintage Postcard of the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, The World's Largest Liner.

Vintage Postcard of the SS Leviathan of the United States Lines, The World's Largest Liner. Quadruple Screw, Oil Burner. Tonnage 59,956. Length 950 Feet, 7 Inches. Width 100 Feet, 3 Inches. 44 Times Around the Promenade Deck 1 Mile. Postally Used 13 June 1934. GGA Image ID # 1680d88e7b

 

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Speed Records and Luxurious Fittings Attract Business and Great Liner Carries Largest Number of Steerage Passengers Taken from New York This Year

 

The Flagship of the United States Lines, SS Leviathan, Docked at Pier 86, North River.

The Flagship of the United States Lines, SS Leviathan, Docked at Pier 86, North River. GGA Image ID # 14150c2c99

 

WITH everything spick and span W after her trial trip and with such minor alterations as were considered necessary all made and out of the way, the great Leviathan steamed away from her pier at 46th Street on July 4th with every cabin occupied and with the largest number of steerage passengers taken from this port during the year.

Preceded by a replica of the Clermont and accompanied by a squadron of naval seaplanes overhead, the great liner nosed her way slowly down the Hudson to the open sea amid cheers and good wishes from a great throng that lined the pier heads and blackened the sea wall at the Battery.

It was a fine and impressive sight and folks forgot the drizzle of summer rain in their enthusiasm for this great representative vessel of the American Merchant Marine.

The demand for space on the Leviathan has been unprecedented and many people planning trips abroad who were unable to obtain accommodations on the maiden voyage have decided to await the next sailing of the ship, which is scheduled for July 28.

 

Winter Garden and the Ritz Carlton Restaurant on the SS Leviathan.

Winter Garden and the Ritz Carlton Restaurant on the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 14151b1578

 

The astonishment of Aladdin when he entered the wonderful cave of the Genii was experienced afresh last Wednesday, when the Leviathan's passengers streamed up the gang planks.

From stem to stern, the great ship showed what American ingenuity can accomplish; not only in the way of shipbuilding and reconditioning, but in artistic arrangement and in the creation of that intangible quality which we Yankees call “class.”

Thousands of feet of holystoned deck space where there is room for more than twelve people to walk abreast was the first thing to strike the eye, and immediately impressed one with the idea of spaciousness.

Then there was the broad navigating bridge, equipped with every conceivable appliance and with last minute wrinkles too numerous to mention. The huge Sperry searchlight, operated from the bridge, stood out free and clear on the foremast.

 

The SS Leviathan Carries Non-Capsizable Motor Lifeboats Equipped with Wireless.

The SS Leviathan Carries Non-Capsizable Motor Lifeboats Equipped with Wireless. GGA Image ID # 141538dbc0

 

Between decks were the great social halls, Ritz restaurant, magnificent lounges, and deluxe staterooms; winding stairways like those found only in vast public buildings; scrolled glass doors opening into snug elevators, which take one quickly from deck to deck.

Winding passages and broad vistas: rooms decorated in various periods with rich hangings and tastefully arranged carving; soft rugs into which one's feet sink noiselessly; the winter garden; the flower house; the great swimming pool. But one could go on endlessly describing this Pandora's Box of marvels which is the American-flag ship—Leviathan.

These are the showy things; but down below are the great engines which have given such a good account of themselves. To describe these engines would require volumes, but suffice it to say that they stack up admirably against the best of their kind in the world and, judging by the fine records made on the recent trial trip, it would seem that they are a shade to the good.

When the Leviathan sailed away last Wednesday, she carried a distinguished passenger list. Representatives of the United States Lines, operators of the great liner, stated that the cabin list included 800 first cabin, 450 second and 450 third.

Among the passengers making the first trip was Albert D. Lasker, under whose administration as chairman of the United States Shipping Board the big vessel was reconditioned.

 

Captain Herbert Hartley, Commander of the SS Leviathan.

Captain Herbert Hartley, Commander of the SS Leviathan. GGA Image ID # 141599f4f7

 

As a special honor to Mr. Lasker he has been assigned the Presidential suite, the luxurious quarters originally intended by her German builders to accommodate Germany's deposed emperor, William Hohenzollern.

Other well-known persons booked for the maiden voyage included Vincent Astor, Mrs. J. Borden Harriman and Col. George Harvey, United States Ambassador to the Court of St. James, who postponed his departure in order to sail on the liner.

H. C. Eackel, vice-president Underwood Typewriter Company, and Mrs. Eackel; Howard Chandler Christy, artist: Oran McCormick, publisher: E. J. Laidlaw, banker, Mrs. Laidlaw and party; Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Elizalde, Minister from Ecuador; Louis Wiley and valet, business manager of the New York Times; Congressman Madden; Senator and Mrs. Nicholas Longworth; Gen. Butler Ames: Mr. and Mrs. G. Logan Payne and daughter; Dr. Sawyer, the President's physician, and Mrs. Sawyer; Frederick Cody and party; Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Lorimer; Judge and Mrs. I. Wasservogel; W. Booth, vice-president Guarantee Trust Company, and Mrs. Booth; Charles H. Moss, vice-president Fairbanks Scale Company, Mrs. Moss and party; J. E. Rothwell, president Boston Chamber of Commerce; George Washington Grant and family: Captain Charles Warton, United States Army; Hiram Abrams, president United Artists Corporation, and Mrs. Abrams; Senator and Mrs. Smoot: Juan F. De Cardenas, Spanish Embassy, and Mrs. De Cardenas; Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Speyer and family; Judge Robert Lovett, Anna Fitzu, Francisca Peralta, Metropolitan opera star; General Coleman Du Pont, J. M. Thomson, owner of the New Orleans Item, and Mrs. Thomson; Dr. Edward J. Vaughan, of Chicago; Congressman George N. Seger and Mrs. Seger.

Also among those on board in the second cabin are J. W. Slack, of Silver Creek, N.Y., who was one of the million-dollar bidders for the fleet of the United States Shipping Board, and Mrs. Slack.

It was also announced that all of the cargo space on the big ship had been taken by Wilson & Co., Chicago packers, and a consignment of foodstuffs had been rushed here from Chicago on fast trains, According to George A. Blair, general traffic manager for Wilson & Co., the firm was so impressed by the record time made on the trial trip of the ship that the entire cargo space was immediately booked.

But this account would not be complete without reference to the executive personnel of the Leviathan—the officers who will be responsible for the great property placed in their charge and who will have so much to do with the future success of this huge unit in the American Merchant Marine. An official list of these officers follows:

 

SENIOR PERSONNEL, DECK DEPARTMENT

  • Herbert Hartley, Captain
  • H. C. Fish: Staff Commander
  • K. B. Lowry, Chief Officer
  • J. P. Linder, First Officer
  • E. W. Higgins, Second Officer
  • H. Manning; Second Officer
  • G. F. Danforth, Third Officer
  • J. S. Bowen. Third Officer
  • L. M. Sanders, Third Officer
  • W. E. Burns, Fourth Officer
  • J. F. Wilson, Cadet Officer
  • E. N. Pickerill, Chief Radio Officer
  • J. R. Irwin, 1st Assistant Radio Officer
  • E. Buckley, Chief Boatswain
  • J Buchanan, Chief Carpenter
  • C. A. White, Deck Yeoman
  • M. H. Hunt, Purser
  • J. G. Tedd, Second Purser
  • H. Beckett, Assistant Purser
  • P. V. Corey, Doctor
  • T. F. Hanlon, Assistant Doctor

 

SENIOR PERSONNEL ENGINE DEPARTMENT

  • R. L. Harrison, Chief Engineer
  • J. J. Fagen, Staff Engineer
  • R. Douglas, Staff Engineer
  • W. J. Lundy, Staff Engineer
  • B. L. Cartmel, 1st Assistant Engineer
  • C. H. Isgar, 1st Assistant Engineer
  • D. H. Betts, 1st Assistant Engineer
  • M. P. lverson, 2d Assistant Engineer
  • J. M. Cowell, 2d Assistant Engineer
  • E. L. Dawson, 2d Assistant Engineer
  • E. J. Deeds, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • J. M. Senlle, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • G. L. Clow, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • G. H. Begley, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • L. L. Szatkowski, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • C. C. Merry, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • A. R. Brebner, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • W. N. O'Connor, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • A. H. Claudius, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • M. T. Minnihan, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • W. J. Brockie, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • A. Schlexer, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • F. H. Kipper, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • T. Webster, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • A. M. Davis, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • H. J. Williamson, Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • C. Hunt. Senior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • J. W. Thomas Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • W. R. Fernald. Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • W. J. Smith, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • E. Dowell, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • J. F. Halle, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • C. C. Clark, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • W. G.  Hawkins, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • C. H. S. Hallett, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • T. B. Milroy, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • J. T. Olson, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • J.A. Smith, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • W. B. Schaum, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • J. E. Bacorn, Junior 3d Assistant Engimeer
  • J. A. Hanna, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • F. J. Schoff, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • H. G. Thompson, Junior 3d Assistant Engineer
  • L. I. Sawyer, 4th Assistant Engineer
  • G. C. Tucker, 4th Assistant Engineer
  • W. E. Wallace, Hydraulic Engineer
  • G. W. Bailes, Chief Refrigerating Engineer
  • R. J. Cross. Chief Electrician
  • A. G. McCarthy, Chief plumber
  • S. Crawford, Senior. Boilermaker
  • Chas. H. Mathias, Leading Machinist
  • D. E. Trower, Engineer Writer
  • Wm. R. Broughton, Engineer Writer

 

STEWARD'S DEPARTMENT

W. J. Gibson, Chief Steward: J. Nicholas Assistant Chief Steward; T. Swindles, Second Steward; Wm. Pearse: Chef-De-Cuisine.

 

"Leviathan Sails on Maiden Voyage with Full Cabins," in The Marine Journal: America's Leading Marine Weekly, New York, Saturday, Vol. 47, No. 1, 7 July 1923, p. 14-15+.

 

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Trip to Cherbourg Is Made in Five Days, Eighteen Hours---American Merchant Marine Seeks Friendly Trade Rivalry, Not Speed Records, Says Lasker

THE United States Lines passenger liner Leviathan, queen of the American overseas fleet and pride of the American Merchant Marine, arrived at Southampton last Tuesday, having completed her first trip across the Atlantic as an American passenger vessel in five days, eighteen hours.

The entire voyage was without incident and everything functioned as though the ship had been in service for a year, instead of less than one week. The opinion of both passengers and crew was that the vessel had made an excellent showing and that there was but small room for minor improvements.

The Leviathan maintained an average speed of 23.65 knots, covering on the record day 565 knots. There were no breakdowns and the machinery functioned perfectly.

No repairs will be needed on the other side, and all that will be needed is the water, fuel and oil supplies. Had it not been for fog in the Channel. it is more than likely that the time made by the Leviathan would have been shaved by an hour or so, for it was after 8 P.M. that the pilot boat caught its first glimpse of the vessel.

Some liquor was carried by individual passengers on the trip, but the ship was in every sense of the word “dry” so far as the majority of the passengers and the crew were concerned.

Albert Lasker, former chairman of the U. S. Shipping Board, who made the trip across as a special commissioner, was subjected to a running fire of questions as soon as the vessel docked.

In outlining the policy of the Board for keeping the American flag on the seas, Mr. Lasker said in part:

“We are not challenging anybody. We believe the Atlantic is big enough for both England and the United States. We have learned a lot from the British.

“On this trip we did not try to beat the Mauretania's record——but on some trip when we have a following gale we may try. We sought primarily to make the Leviathan a paying proposition and have given a lot of attention to the problem of fuel economy. We found that each day we got better results from the engines.”

Throughout, Mr. Lasker emphasized that the Leviathan is purely a commercial proposition and that any except ordinary trade rivalry with Britain is not intended.

“The American merchant marine will never die," he declared.

Senator Smoot and Representative Madden went further, however, saying: “We intend to have a merchant marine whether it pays or not."

Passengers appeared well pleased with the efficiency of the crew and provisions made for their comfort. It was stated that after the first day service was smooth and quick, and some of the ship's officers said there had not been one case of seasickness during the crossing, which, however, was not rough.

Three records in radio communication were established by the Leviathan, according to an announcement made by the Western Electric Company.

“The ship not only broke all previous war-time communication marks by transmitting 15,000 words a day to and from the shore. but managed to keep in constant touch with land radio stations 1,000 to 1,300 miles away,” says the announcement. “

By means of new apparatus especially designed for it, the Leviathan operated simultaneously and for long periods two different sending and receiving sets.

“The newly developed transmitter installed on the Leviathan is designed to send messages on four different wave lengths. A rotary wave-changing switch, operated by means of an automobile steering wheel, permits almost instantaneous change to any one of four wave lengths-—18,000, 2,100, 2,400 or 2,500 meters—on the Leviathan’s antennae.

“Three of these wave lengths were used on the trial trip—1,800, 2,100 and 2,500 meters; the highest and the lowest were used for transmitting messages and the intermediate one for calling stations."

 

"Leviathan Meets Every Expectation on Maiden Voyage," in The Marine Journal: America's Leading Marine Weekly, New York, Saturday, Vol. 47, No. 2, 14 July 1923, p.14.

 

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