SS Statendam Archival Collection

 

 

Statendam (1898) Holland-America Line

Sailed as the SS Statendam from 1898 to 1911

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 10,491. Dimensions: 515' x 59' (530' o.l.). Propulsion: Twin-screw, 15 knots. Triple expansion engines. Masts and Funnels: Two masts and one funnel. Maiden Voyage: Commenced her maiden voyage from Rotterdam to New York in August 1898. Renamed: (a) Scotian (1911), (b) Marglen (1922). Fate: Scrapped in Italy, 1927.

 

Statendam (1917) Holland-America Line

Never Sailed as the SS Statendam

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 32,234. Dimensions: 740' x 86'. Propulsion: Triple-screw, 18 1/2 knots. Triple expansion engines and one low pressure steam turbine. Masts and Funnels: Two masts and three funnels. Launched: as the Statendam in 1914. WWI Service: Due to the First World War she was taken over by the British Government. Completed as a troopship and renamed Justicia. Fate: Torpedoed and sunk by submarines, July 19, 1918, off North Ireland while bound for New York to embark troops. There was a loss of 10 lives.

 

Statendam (1929) Holland-America Line

Sailed as the Statendam from 1929 to 1939

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 29,511. Dimensions: 670' x 81' (698' o.l.). Propulsion: Steam turbines. Masts and Funnels: Two masts and three funnels. Launched: at Belfast on September 11, 1924. Work was held up for a time, but eventually was towed to Rotterdam for completion. Maiden voyage: Rotterdam to New York, April 11, 1929. Fate: This flagship of the Holland-America Line was laid up in September 1939. During the Nazi invasion of the Netherlands, May 1940. she was destroyed by fire. The Statendam was among the several vessels that were in the port of Rotterdam at the time. Some of the bitterest fighting took place in the vicinity of the piers where the ships were tied. The Statendam was repeatedly hit by the crossfire from both sides of the river. The fire on board continued to blaze for five days and she became a total loss.

 

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Passenger Manifest, Holland America Line TSS Statendam, 1908, Rotterdam to New York

1908-08-15 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: First and Second Cabin

Date of Departure: 15 August 1908

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer

Commander: Captain P. Van Den Heuvel

 

Passenger Manifest, Holland America Line TSS Statendam, 1908, Rotterdam to New York

1908-09-19 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: First and Second Cabin Passengers

Date of Departure: 12 September 1908

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer

Commander: Captain B. G. Bruinsma

 

Passenger Manifest, Holland America Line TSS Statendam 1934 Front Cover

1929-08-23 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: First and Second Cabin

Date of Departure: 23 August 1929

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore Van Den Heuvel

 

Front Cover, First Class and Second Cabin Passenger List, SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing Friday, 4 July 1930, from Rotterdam to New York.

1930-07-04 SS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line

Class of Passengers: First Class and Second Cabin

Date of Departure: 4 July 1930

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore Krol, Lieut. Sr. Grade. R.N.R.

 

Passenger List, TSS Statendam, Holland-America Line, September 1930

1930-09-27 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: Tourist Third Cabin

Date of Departure: 27 September 1930

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore Krol

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, August 1932 Westbound Voyage - TSS Statendam

1932-08-26 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: Tourist

Date of Departure: 26 August 1932

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore J. J. Bijl

 

Front Cover of a First, Tourist, and Third Class Passenger List from the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing 29 June 1934 from New York to Rotterdam via Plymouth and Boulogne-sur-Mer

1934-06-29 SS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: First, Tourist, and Third Class

Date of Departure: 29 June 1934

Route: New York to Rotterdam via Plymouth and Boulogne-sur-Mer

Commander: Captain J. J. Bijl

 

Passenger Manifest, Holland America Line TSS Statendam 1934 Front Cover

1934-08-25 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: First Class

Date of Departure: 25 August 1934

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore J. J. Bijl

 

Front Cover, Holland-America Passenger Manifest - TSS Statendam 1934

1934-10-06 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: First Class

Date of Departure: 6 October 1934

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore J. J. Bijl

 

Passenger Manifest, Holland America Line TSS Statendam 1936

1936-08-06 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 6 August 1936

Route: Rotterdam to Boston and New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore J. J. Bijl

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, July 1937 Westbound Voyage - TSS Statendam

1937-07-10 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 10 July 1937

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore J. J. Bijl

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, August 1937 Westbound Voyage - TSS Statendam

1937-08-06 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 6 August 1937

Route: Rotterdam to New York and Boston via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commodore J. J. Bijl

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, August 1938 Westbound Voyage - TSS Statendam

1938-08-20 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 20 August 1938

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commander G. J. Barendse

 

Passenger Manifest Cover, October 1938 Westbound Voyage - TSS Statendam

1938-10-01 TSS Statendam Passenger List

Steamship Line: Holland-America Line / Netherlands American Steam Navigation Company (NASM)

Class of Passengers: Cabin, Tourist and Third Class

Date of Departure: 1 October 1938

Route: Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton

Commander: Commander G. J. Barendse

 

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Holland-America Line First Cabin Rates - 1905

This 1905 brochure featured First Cabin Rates for the TSS Noordam, TSS Ryndam, TSS Potsdam, TSS Statendam, and TSS Rotterdam, covering the Summer Season, Early and Late Summer Season, and Winter Season, To and From New York, Rotterdam, and Boulogne-sur-Mer. The Brochure included General Information for Passengers, Offices, and Agencies, and First and Second Class Railway Fares from Rotterdam to Principal Cities in Europe.

 

Front Page, Passenger Steamship Timetable, January to December 1923, Subject to change without prior notice.

Holland-America Line Sailing Schedule - 1923

Brochure Containing Holland-America Line Passenger Steamship Timetable, January to December 1923, a list of their global agents, agencies, and offices, and an illustration of the new Twin Screw Steamer SS Staendam Currently Under Construction.

 

Front Cover, Holland America Line First Class Service to Europe Brochure, 1929.

First Class Service to Europe - 1929

THE Holland-America Line has acquired a reputation of its own—a reputation for first-class service that is not excelled on the Seven Seas. Ships Include the Statendam, Rotterdam, Nieuw Amsterdam, Veendam, and Volendam.

 

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SS Statendam Season 1905 First Cabin Passage Rates, To and From New York, Rotterdam, and Boulogne-sur-Mer.

SS Statendam Season 1905 First Cabin Passage Rates, To and From New York, Rotterdam, and Boulogne-sur-Mer. Summer Season, Early and Late Summer Season, and Winter Season. Rates Effective 25 March 1905. GGA Image ID # 1f930fc0b8. Click to View Larger Image.

 

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Front Cover of a Vintage Independence Day Third Class Dinner Menu from Wednesday, 4 July 1934 on board the RMS Statendam of the Holland-America Line

1934-07-04 SS Statendam Independence Day Dinner Menu

Vintage Independence Day Third Class Dinner Menu from Wednesday, 4 July 1934 on board the RMS Statendam of the Holland-America Line featured Stewed Codfish à la Rochambeau, Roast Aloyau of Beef à la Mount Vernon, and George Washington Cake for dessert.

 

Front Cover of a Vintage Third Class Farewell Dinner Menu from Thursday, 5 July 1934 on board the RMS Statendam of the Holland-America Line

1934-07-05 SS Statendam Farewell Dinner Menu

Vintage Third Class Farewell Dinner Menu from Thursday, 5 July 1934 on board the RMS Statendam of the Holland-America Line featured Suprême of Halibut Fecampoise, Braised Beef Bohémienne, and Génoise Cake for dessert

 

Front Cover, SS Statendam Dinner Bill of Fare - 30 November 1939

1939-11-30 SS Statendam Dinner Menu

Vintage Tourist Class Dinner Bill of Fare from Thursday, 30 November 1939 on board the RMS Statendam of the Holland-America Line featured Roast Boneless Saddle of Lamb, Roast Hare with Apple Sauce, and Mixed Compote for dessert.

 

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Atlantic Ocean Track Chart and Completed Abstract of Log of the 15 August 1908 Voyage of the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line.

Atlantic Ocean Track Chart and Completed Abstract of Log of the 15 August 1908 Voyage of the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line. GGA Image ID # 15c72f2bd1

 

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Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 18 September 1929 to 24 January 1930.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 18 September 1929 to 24 January 1930. Ships Included the Nieuw Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Rotterdam Passenger List, 11 September 1929. GGA Image ID # 1df95d8515

 

Sailing Schedule, Rotterdam-Boulogne-Southampton-New York, from 12 July 1930 to 15 November 1930.

Sailing Schedule, Rotterdam-Boulogne-Southampton-New York, from 12 July 1930 to 15 November 1930. Ships Included the Nieuw Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Statendam, and Volendam. All Westbound steamers call at Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton for the embarkation of passengers from France and Great Britain. The Nieuw Amsterdam and Volendam May Call at Halifax on the Westbound Voyage. SS Statendam First Class and Second Cabin Passenger List, 4 July 1930. GGA Image ID # 20ccd51b32

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 15 August 1930 to 15 November 1930.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 15 August 1930 to 15 November 1930. Ships Included the Nieuw Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Statendam, and Volendam. SS Rotterdam Passenger List, 9 August 1930. GGA Image ID # 1dfa1f1d3e

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 23 October 1931 to 15 December 1931.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 23 October 1931 to 15 December 1931. Ships Included the Nieuw Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Statendam, and Veendam. SS Rotterdam Passenger List, 9 October 1931. GGA Image ID # 1dfa9fa99c

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 9 September 1933 to 2 December 1933.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 9 September 1933 to 2 December 1933. Ships Included the Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Rotterdam Passenger List, 2 September 1933. GGA Image ID # 1dfab45fcd

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 9 June 1934 to 25 September 1934.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 9 June 1934 to 25 September 1934. Ships Included the Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Rotterdam Passenger List, 26 May 1934. GGA Image ID # 1dfaf164f7

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 19 October 1934 to 19 December 1934.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 19 October 1934 to 19 December 1934. Ships Included the Rotterdam, Statendam, and Volendam. SS Statendam Passenger List, 6 October 1934. GGA Image ID # 1dfdbf3135

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 11 August 1936 to 14 November 1936.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 11 August 1936 to 14 November 1936. Ships Included the Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Statendam Passenger List, 6 August 1936. GGA Image ID # 1dfdc2adae

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 17 July 1937 to 16 October 1937.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 17 July 1937 to 16 October 1937. Ships Included the Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Statendam Passenger List, 10 July 1937. GGA Image ID # 1dfdc64ca3

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 21 August 1937 to 11 December 1937.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 21 August 1937 to 11 December 1937. Ships Included the Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Rotterdam Passenger List, 11 August 1937. GGA Image ID # 1dfb72695a

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 18 September 1937 to 5 March 1938.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 18 September 1937 to 5 March 1938. Ships Included the Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Veendam Passenger List, 4 September 1937. GGA Image ID # 1dfd2c4fd0

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 27 August 1938 to 10 December 1938.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 27 August 1938 to 10 December 1938. Ships Included the Nieuw Amsterdam, Noordam, Statendam, Veendam, and Volendam. SS Nieuw Amsterdam Passenger List, 27 August 1938. GGA Image ID # 1dfdec6bc9

 

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 8 October 1938 to 4 February 1939.

Proposed Sailings, Rotterdam-Boulogne sur Mer-Southampton-New York, from 8 October 1938 to 4 February 1939. Ships Included the Nieuw Amsterdam, Noordam, Rotterdam, Veendam, Volendam, and Zaandam. SS Statendam Passenger List, 1 October 1938. GGA Image ID # 1dfe8996e7

 

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The New SS Statendam, 30,000 Tons Register, 40,000 Tons Displacement.

The New SS Statendam, 30,000 Tons Register, 40,000 Tons Displacement. Painting by Fred J. Hoertz. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec5fe3aca

 

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First Class Palm Court on the SS Statendam.

First Class Palm Court on the SS Statendam. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec6ac4ad3

 

First Class Dining Room on the SS Statendam.

First Class Dining Room on the SS Statendam. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec6d8340e

 

A Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the Statendam.

A Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the Statendam. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec6fb73d1

 

Another Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the SS Statendam.

Another Corner of a Cabin Deluxe on the SS Statendam. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec71eab06

 

First Class Enclosed Promenade on the SS Statendam.

First Class Enclosed Promenade on the SS Statendam. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec72625d4

 

First Class Children's Playroom on the SS Statendam.

First Class Children's Playroom on the SS Statendam. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec7d47c5f

 

A Minimum Rate First Class Stateroom on the SS Statendam.

A Minimum Rate First Class Stateroom on the SS Statendam. First Class Service to Europe, 1929. GGA Image ID # 1ec83c8112

 

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Back Cover of a Cabin Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line Dated 15 August 1908.

Back Cover of a Cabin Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line Dated 15 August 1908. GGA Image ID # 15c70c4ff0

 

Back Cover of a 19 September 1908 Cabin Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line.

Back Cover of a 19 September 1908 Cabin Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line. GGA Image ID # 15c7f099e1

 

Back Cover of a Cabin Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing Friday, 23 August 1929 from Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton.

Back Cover of a Cabin Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing Friday, 23 August 1929 from Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton. GGA Image ID # 17cd658256

 

Back Cover, SS Statendam First Class and Second Cabin Passenger List, 4 July 1930.

Back Cover, SS Statendam First Class and Second Cabin Passenger List, 4 July 1930. GGA Image ID # 20ccdfa63d

 

Back Cover, Holland-America Line SS Statendam First, Tourist, and Third Class Passenger List - 29 June 1934.

Back Cover, Holland-America Line SS Statendam First, Tourist, and Third Class Passenger List - 29 June 1934. GGA Image ID # 162da9de75

 

Back Cover of a First Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing Saturday, 25 August 1934 from Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton.

Back Cover of a First Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing Saturday, 25 August 1934 from Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton. GGA Image ID # 17cdf9fb49

 

Back Cover of a First Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing 6 October 1934 from Rotterdam to New York

Back Cover of a First Class Passenger List for the SS Statendam of the Holland-America Line, Departing 6 October 1934 from Rotterdam to New York via Boulogne-sur-Mer and Southampton. GGA Image ID # 17ce6aebc3

 

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Title Page with Listing of Senior Officers and Staff, SS Statendam First Class and Second Cabin Passenger List, 4 July 1930.

Title Page with Listing of Senior Officers and Staff, SS Statendam First Class and Second Cabin Passenger List, 4 July 1930. GGA Image ID # 20cc5dc60f

 

 

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STCA First Class Deluxe Cruise to the West Indies on the New SS Statendam, Leaving New York 20 December 1930.

STCA First Class Deluxe Cruise to the West Indies on the New SS Statendam, Leaving New York 20 December 1930. Itinerery Includes Nassau, Port-au-Prince, Kingston (Jamaica), Colon (Panama Canal), and Havanna. Returning to New York on 5 January 1931. SS Statendam Passenger List, 27 September 1930. GGA Image ID # 1dfd57be45

 

Advertisement: West Indies and Caribbean. Four Luxury Cruises by the Splendid SS Statendam and the SS Volendam.

Advertisement: West Indies and Caribbean. Four Luxury Cruises by the Splendid SS Statendam and the SS Volendam. First Cruise Leaves New York on 20 December 1930. SS Rotterdam Passenger List, 9 August 1930. GGA Image ID # 1df9d1422a

 

Fall, Winter, and Spring Cruises by Famous Holland-America Liners from New York, Beginning 18 September 1937 and Ending with an 8-Day Cruise to Havana Leaving New York on 19 March 1938.

Fall, Winter, and Spring Cruises by Famous Holland-America Liners from New York, Beginning 18 September 1937 and Ending with an 8-Day Cruise to Havana Leaving New York on 19 March 1938. Ships Include the Rotterdam, Statendam, Veendam, and Vollendam. Throughout the coming full, winter and spring the Trans-Atlantic liners of the Holland-America Line will offer unusual opportunities to visit the West-Indies and to enjoy the carefully planned cruises and the traditionally elaborate entertainment aboard. Duration, destination and price vary. SS Veendam Passenger List, 4 September 1937. GGA Image ID # 1dfc3f4e05

 

Advertisement: The Inaugural Cruise Around South America. 46 Days, 14,113 Miles, 13 Ports, Nine Countries on Holland-America Line's New Flagship, the SS Nieuw Amsterdam, Leaving New York 11 February 1939.

Advertisement: The Inaugural Cruise Around South America. 46 Days, 14,113 Miles, 13 Ports, Nine Countries on Holland-America Line's New Flagship, the SS Nieuw Amsterdam, Leaving New York 11 February 1939. $720 and Up. Also Two SS Nieuw Amsterdam West Indies and Rio Cruises, 25 Days, Leaving New York 17 December 1938 and 14 January 1939. $360 and Up. SS Statendam Passenger List, 1 October 1938. GGA Image ID # 1dfe16381a

 

Advertisement: Holland-America Line's Premiere Orient/South Pacific 50-Day Discovery Cruise on the SS Statendam, October 1964.

Advertisement: Holland-America Line's Premiere Orient/South Pacific 50-Day Discovery Cruise on the SS Statendam, October 1964. TSS Nieuw Amsterdam First and Tourist Class Passenger List, 12 June 1964. GGA Image ID # 209c0e3b60

 

From Los Angeles October 6, 1964 aboard the SS Statendam, calling at:
Honolulu • Yokohama • Kobe • Hong Kong • Singapore • Bali «Suva (Fiji Islands) • Pago Pago (Samoa) • and Papeete (Tahiti).

Rates from $1,485.

Come along, as Holland-America brings to the Pacific its decades of experience and leadership in luxury cruises. You'll discover fascinating sights and shopping ashore, plus many other pleasures aboard your world-famous, air-conditioned cruise liner Statendam.

 

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Information for Passengers - 15 August 1908

Berths and Staterooms Should be reserved as soon as possible in order to secure the most favorable location, especially during the summer season, when all available rooms are usually engaged considerable time (sometimes months) previous to departure of the steamship.

When applying for accommodations, either by mail or telegraph, the name of steamship, date of departure, number and sex of Passengers, and desired class of accommodations, should be stated.

Berths are not considered engaged unless secured by paying a deposit of $25.00 per berth for the first cabin and $20.00 per berth for the second cabin accommodations.

The balance of passage money must be paid not later than two weeks before sailing; if this has not been paid on or before that time, the Company reserves the right to resell the allotted accommodations.

Deposit moneys are refunded only if notice of cancellation is given not later than two weeks before sailing.

Passengers who do not sail on steamship for which they have engaged accommodations or purchased a ticket, will forfeit fifty percent of the passage money, unless notice is given not later than two weeks previous to sailing.

Return and Prepaid Tickets entitle holders to passage only during the season and for the accommodations for which they have been issued. If used at any other season or for other accommodations than the face value indicates, holders will be required to make additional payment, or will be refunded any eventual difference in accordance with rates and rules in effect.

Return or Prepaid Tickets are good for one year from date of issue and are not transferable. Upon application to one of the Company's Passenger Offices, they may be extended by paying the difference between the rate in effect at the date of issue and time of sailing, in accordance with the conditions on passage contract.

Return Accommodations may be secured through the Company's Passenger Offices or Agents. They should be engaged when securing berths for the outward trip, or as soon thereafter as possible.

If a passenger is prevented from sailing on a steamship for which return accommodations have been secured, a transfer to an earlier or later steamship can be made by applying to either of the Company's Offices or Agencies, provided application for the transfer be made not later than two weeks previous to departure of the steamship on which berths had originally been reserved.

If Unused Return Tickets are offered for cancellation, the amount paid for the round trip, less full outgoing fare and agent's commission, will be refunded against delivery of the return certificate to one of the Company's General Passenger Offices after authorisation has been received from Company's General Passenger Office at Rotterdam.

Through Checking of Baggage for Paris. — Baggage of cabin Passengers from New York, to Paris via Boulogne-sur-Mer, can be checked through at our docks in Hoboken before embarkation.

All Baggage should be forwarded so as to be delivered at Company's dock not later than one hour before departure of the steamship. If the baggage is sent in advance, Passengers will please inform the Holland-America Line, by letter stating by what Railroad or Express Company the baggage has been forwarded, whether anything is to be paid for Passengers' account upon receipt of said baggage and by what steamship Passengers intend to leave.

The baggage must be claimed from the baggagemaster on the pier previous to embarkation, in order to prevent errors.

No baggage will be forwarded unless appropriately labeled and entered in the baggage manifest on the dock.

Steamer Trunks should not be higher than 13 inches, and of the usual width and length, so that they can be placed under the berth or sofa in the stateroom.

Larger Pieces of Baggage are not permitted in the staterooms, but are stowed away in the baggage hold.

All pieces of baggage destined for staterooms must be marked "wanted", those for baggage hold "not wanted," and must bear passenger's name, destination, number of berth and name of steamship; tags may be had at all Company's offices and agencies or, on board, from the Purser.

Eastbound Passengers from the interior should have their baggage checked to the Holland-America Line dock, Hoboken, N. J., by the baggage express agent on ate train, previous to arrival in New York, Jersey City, etc.

Custom House Examination. — The baggage of Passengers leaving the steamship at Boulogne-sur-Mer, will be examined by the French Custom House officers at the Gare Maritime at said port, or, if checked through to Paris in New-York or on board, on arrival at Paris.

The examination by the Rolland Custom House officials will take place either on board, two or three hours previous to arrival at Rotterdam, or at the Hook of Holland, at the new pier of the Holland-America Line, built at the "Hook" in 1903, and which pier may be used as a landing place for Passengers and their baggage whenever tide or other circumstances may prevent the steamship from proceeding at once to Rotterdam.

Orders for Delivery of baggage free of charge at the railway depots in Rotterdam and Boulogne-sur-Mer are taken by Company's employees on board the ship or at the Hook of Holland.

Bicycles, provided properly crated, will be taken as baggage at owner's risk, at a fixed rate.

Steamer Chairs, of improved construction, may be rented at the different offices of the Company, or on the dock, for one trip, at a fixed rate.

Valuables may be placed in the custody of the Purser during the voyage, without, however, any guarantee or responsibility on the part of the Company.

Inflammable or explosive articles are not allowed on board. SS Rotterdam and "Nieuw Amsterdam" are provided with a safe deposit which is at the disposal of Passengers.

Arms must be surrendered to the purser during the voyage.

Seats at Table. — Seats at table are allotted immediately after sailing.

Mail will be accepted by the Purser after leaving New York and forwarded by pilot from Sandy Hook, without responsibility for proper mailing, however, on the part of the Company.

Letters or postcards to be posted at Boulogne-sur-Mer should be put in the mailbag which will be hung in due time in a convenient place. Passengers are requested to put their letters etc. in the mailbag themselves.

Stamps, stationery, postal cards, cable and telegraph blanks can be obtained from the saloon steward.

Letters and Telegrams. — The Company is willing to accept letters or telegrams for Passengers to be delivered on board on arrival or departure, without assuming, however, any responsibility for their proper delivery.

The name of the passenger should be distinctly written, also the name of the steamship on which Passengers travel. Undelivered letters are returned to the Post Office.

Money. — Money of the United States or of European countries is accepted on board the steamships of the Holland America Line in payment of all bills, at fixed rates of Exchange.

Foreign moneys are bought and sold at current rates at the Company's Offices in Europe.

Source: SS Statendam Passenger List - 15 August 1908

 

Information for Passengers - 23 August 1929

Notice: All Passengers will receive on board a landing card and are requested to present same before leaving the steamer to a U.S. Immigrant Inspector for endorsement.

Source: TSS Statendam Passenger List - 23 August 1929

 

Information for Passengers - 29 June 1934

Mail and Telegrams. Letters, Packages, etc., for passengers are brought on board steamer before embarkation and placed in the passengers' rooms. For any inquiries relating to mails, passengers are invited to call at the Chief Steward's office.

Seats at Table. Application for table seats may be made to the Chief Steward before sailing, or on embarkation. On midnight sailings permanent table seats will be assigned after breakfast the next morning. Hours for meals are posted on the ship's bulletin board.

Return Tickets. The Purser will be glad to radio, free of charge, to the New York or European offices of the Line, as necessary, if you wish to make return reservations on any steamer of the Line.

Passengers from New York who already hold return tickets, should register same at one of the offices of the Line indicated on the back page of this list.

Valuables. For the convenience of the passengers the Line has provided safe deposit boxes in the Purser's office in which any valuables may be deposited upon payment to the Purser of $4.00, this amount to be refunded when the key of the deposit box is returned. However, the Line does not assume any responsibility for the safe custody of such articles. (Passengers may, if they wish, protect themselves by insurance.)

Personal Funds. For the convenience of passengers, the Purser is prepared to cash a limited amount of recognized Travelers' Checks or to exchange money at official rates as posted at the Purser's office. A receipt is issued on such transactions, on the Company's Form. Personal checks cannot be cashed by the Purser.

Divine Service. Divine service will be held on Sundays, at hours announced on the bulletin board, if a recognized clergyman on board is willing to officiate.

Ship's Newspaper. "The Ocean Post," containing latest wireless news and closing prices of the leading securities on the New York Stock Exchange, is published on board. A copy of this newspaper is placed every morning in passenger's stateroom with the compliments of the Line.

Medical Attention. Passengers requesting and accepting medical attendance and medicines from the ship's Physician, do so without any responsibility on the part of the Company.

The services rendered and the medicines prescribed by the ship's Physician are free, except that in cases, where passengers require the service of ship's Physician for the treatment of ailments for which they already were under the care of a Physician at the time of embarkation, the ship's Physician may charge a reasonable fee for such services, subject to the approval and sanction of the Commander.

Additional Payments on Board. Passengers paying any supplements for room transfers, additional passage money, freight, telegrams, etc., should obtain a receipt from the Purser on the Company's Form.

For radiograms receipt will be furnished by the wireless operator.

Flying in Europe or America. The Holland America Line have made arrangements whereby their passengers have the facilities of the K. L. M. Air Lines in Europe or Curtiss-Wright Flying Service in America, at their disposal on landing.

The Purser will gladly give information on the routes and connections of these air lines and radio ahead for reservations. Only a limited amount of luggage is carried free on these aero planes; excess luggage being charged for at excess baggage rates.

Steamer Chairs, Rugs and Chair Cushions. Deck chain, rugs and chair cushions may be hired on application to the Deck Steward at $ 1.50 each for the voyage.

U. S. Headtax. Passengers who leave the U. S. within 60 days from date of entry and who are entitled to refund of head tax, will obtain refund on board. To this purpose they are invited to deliver the duly signed head tax-certificate to the Purser, together with head tax receipts, issued by some «airier when collecting the tax from passenger.

London and Paris Rail Tickets. Passengers are urged to purchase their London or Paris rail tickets from the Purser as soon as possible after boarding the steamer at New York.

As a rule, special trains are run in connection with the arrival of our steamers at Plymouth and Boulogne-sur-Mer, but when the number of passengers does not warrant special trains, the Line arranges for reservations on regular trains.

Baggage. There is a baggage room on board steamer where passengers may store such personal belongings ns cannot be placed in their cabins, as well as baggage of any kind.

The Baggage Room is open at hours as posted, and all inquiries pertaining to the storing or forwarding of baggage should he addressed to the Baggage Master.

Baggage Insurance. The Company's liability for damage to or loss or detention of baggage is strictly limited, and passengers are, therefore, advised to protect themselves by insurance against risk of loss, theft, damage, pilferage, etc.

Policies may be obtained at current rates at any office of the Line or through the Baggage Master on board this steamer.

Disembarking at Plymouth. Immigration officials board the steamer before disembarkation at Plymouth to lake up the "alien order," previously furnished by the Purser to those landing in England, and to stamp passengers' Landing Cards.

Examination of baggage by customs on shore. Cigarettes, cigars, tobacco, etc., perfumes, wines and spirits are liable to duty if brought into the United Kingdom.

Passengers are reminded that under the laws of the United Kingdom the importation of dogs into Great Britain is prohibited unless a permit has been first obtained from the Board of Agriculture.

Disembarking at Boulogne-Sur-Mer. Inspection of passports will be made on board and Landing Cards issued by immigration officials.

Customs examination of baggage will take place on shore. Cigarettes, cigars and tobacco, etc., are subject to duty.

Disembarking at Rotterdam. All baggage is examined by customs officials upon being landed on shore. A police officer, however, comes on board before the ship docks to endorse passports and issue Landing Cards. These Landing Cards must be surrendered when leaving the ship.

Source: SS Statendam Passenger List - 29 June 1934

 

Information for Passengers - 25 August 1934

Mail and Telegrams. Mail and telegrams for Passengers are brought on board steamer before embarkation and placed in the Passengers' rooms. For any inquiries relating to mails, Passengers are -invited to call at the Chief Steward's office.

Seats at Table. Application for table seats may be made to the Chief Steward. Hours for meals are posted on the ship's bulletin board.

Return Tickets. The Purser will be glad to radio, free of charge, to the New York office of the Line, if you wish to make return reservations on any steamer of the Line.

Valuables. For the convenience of the Passengers the Line has provided safe deposit boxes in the Purser's office in which any valuables may be deposited upon payment to the Purser of $4.—; this amount to be refunded when the key of the deposit box is returned.

However, the Line does not assume any responsibility for the safe custody of such articles. (Passengers may, if they wish, protect themselves by insurance).

Personal Funds. For the convenience of Passengers the Purser is prepared to cash a limited amount of recognized Travelers' Checks or to exchange money at official rates as posted at the Purser's office. A receipt is issued on such transactions on the Company's Form.

Personal checks cannot be cashed on board.

Ship's Newspaper. "The Ocean Post", containing latest wireless news and closing prices of the leading securities on the New York Stock Exchange, is published on board. A copy of this newspaper is placed, when issued, in passenger's stateroom with the compliments of the Line.

Medical Attention. The Holland-America Line assumes no responsibility for services rendered by the ship's Physician,

The services rendered and the medicines prescribed by the Physician are free. of charge, except that in cases, where Passengers require the service of ship's Physician for the treatment of ailments for which they already were under the care of a Physician at the time of embarkation, the ship's Physician may charge a reasonable fee for such services, subject to the approval and sanction of the Commander.

Steamer Chairs, Rugs and Chair Cushions. Deck chairs, rugs and chair cushions may be hired on application to the Deck Steward at $ 1,50 each for the voyage.

U. S. Head-Tax. Passengers in transit through the United States, or Tourists on a visit, who intend to stay in the United States less than 60 days, should express themselves as such towards the U. S. Immigration Inspector in charge upon arrival of the steamer in the United States, when interrogated by that official.

Passengers will then obtain from this Inspector a United States Head-Tax Refund Certificate (Form 514), which should be filled out and signed as directed when leaving the United States. This document must be forwarded to the Holland-America Line, 29 Broadway, New York, together with the Company's Head-Tax Receipt, and refund of the Head-Tax will follow.

Most of the Trans-Atlantic Steamship Lines, including the Holland-America Line, as a courtesy towards their Passengers, have authorized their pursers to make refund of the Head-Tax to Passengers on the voyage back to Europe, in which case the Head-Tax Refund Certificate as well as the Head-Tax Receipt of the Steamship Company who brought the passenger to America, will be taken up by the ship's Purser when making the refund.

Baggage. There is a baggage room on board steamer where Passengers may store such personal belongings as cannot be placed in their cabins, as well as baggage of any kind. The baggage room is open at hours as posted, and all inquiries pertaining to the storing or forwarding of baggage should be addressed to the Baggage Master.

Baggage Insurance. The Company's liability for damage to or loss or detention of baggage is strictly limited, and Passengers are, therefore, advised to protect themselves by insurance against risk of loss, theft, damage, pilferage, etc. Policies may be obtained at current rates at any office of the Line or through the Baggage Master on board this steamer.

Landing at New York. Motor Coach Service. For the convenience of Holland-America Line Passengers and their friends a motor coach service to and from the Holland-America Line Piers and the centrally located New York Hotels McAlpin and Commodore via the new Holland Tunnel is operated by the Fifth Avenue Coach Company arid the Public Service Co-ordinated Transport of N. J.

Through the Purser you can reserve a place in one of the Motor Coaches to either the Hotel McAlpin or the Hotel Commodore at least 12 hours before arrival in New York. The charge for this reservation, for which you will receive a ticket, will be $1.— including the transfer of your hand baggage (not more than two pieces of hand baggage). Large baggage must be sent on separately.

The Holland-America Line accepts no responsibility whatsoever in connection with this coach service.

Source: TSS Statendam Passenger List - 25 August 1934

 

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Front Cover, Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic by Frank O. Braynard, © 1991.

Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic

An absorbing and detailed account of the three ships: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic, 50,000-ton dinosaurs of the transatlantic lines in the years before World War I.

 

Front Cover, Distinguished Liners from The Shipbuilder - 1907-1914, Volume 2. Compiled and Edited, with a New Introduction by Mark D. Warren.

Distinguished Liners from The Shipbuilder - 1907-1914 Volume 2

Distinguished Liners, Volume 2 features 53 famous ships from 1907-1914. Read how the liners were constructed and launched. Lavishly illustrated, each carries many photographs, including the ships, their interiors, machinery, fittings, construction, and launching.

 

Front Cover, Doomed Ships: Great Ocean Liner Disasters by William H. Miller, Jr., 2006.

Doomed Ships: Great Ocean Liner Disasters

Naval historian William H. Miller, Jr. recounts the dramatic stories behind various ill-fated passenger ships. He takes readers beyond the newspaper headlines and formal inquiries, offering firsthand accounts of heroic rescues, daring escapes, and tragic losses.

 

Front Cover, Era of the Passenger Liner by Nicholas T. Cairis. Published by Pegasus Books Ltd., London, 1992.

Era of the Passenger Liner - 1992

The Gilded Era comes back to life as the reader relives the careers of stately ships and express greyhounds from immigrant ships to floating palaces. Scarce, large format book containing 288pp. Features photographs, statistics, and background of 280 passenger liners, each with a picture.

 

Front Cover, The Fabulous Interiors of the Great Ocean Liners, 1984.

The Fabulous Interiors of the Great Ocean Liners - 1984

Some 200 superb photographs—in long shots and close-ups—capture exquisite interiors of world's great "floating palaces"—1890s to 1980s: Titanic, Île de France, Queen Elizabeth, United States, Europa, more. Informative captions provide key details.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Famous Ocean Liners: The Story of Passenger Shipping from the Turn of the Century to the Present Day by William H. Miller, 1987.

Famous Ocean Liners - 1987

Here is the story of twentieth-century passenger shipping, from the first of the superliners — the German Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse — to Cunard's Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary, right up to Queen Elizabeth 2.

 

Front Cover, The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4, by Melvin Maddocks, 1978.

The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4

A history of the world's famous luxury liners provides portraits of the ships. It examines such great disasters as the sinking of the Titanic. This edition explores the grand hotels that traversed the Atlantic between 1840 and 1930.

 

Front Cover, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 1: 1858-1912 by Arnold Kludas, Translated from the German by Charles Hodges, 1975.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1858-1912

This initial volume deals with Ships from 1858-1912, from the first passenger ship of over 10,000 GRT to be placed in service (the Great Eastern) to those unforgettable sister ships, the Olympic and Titanic — the first of more than 40,000 GRT.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 2: 1913-1923 by Arnold Kludas, 1976.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1913-1923

The period 1913-1923 is dealt with in this second volume. Although it was only a decade, it was one of the most turbulent passenger ships in history. Competition to produce ever-larger vessels declined between leading North Atlantic shipping companies. For 20 years, the ships of the Imperator Class were the largest in the world.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 3: 1924-1935 by Arnold Kludas, 1976.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1924-1935

Volume 3 in the series covers the years 1924-1935 and includes the introduction of the well-known superliners Normandie and Queen Mary, both of which successfully competed for the prestigious Blue Riband award for the fastest transatlantic crossing.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 5: 1951-1976 by Arnold Kludas, 1977.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1951-1976

This volume, covering the years 1951-1976, embraces a period of dramatic change in ocean travel, the growth in airline travel causing a sharp decline in passenger liner building and existing liners being increasingly used in the cruising role.

 

Front Cover, Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 1

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 1

The first volume takes us from the construction of the VATERLAND to the end of World War One when the VATERLAND, now the U.S.S Leviathan, was used as a troop transport and packed with fabulous photographs and reproductions of newspaper articles.

 

Front Cover, Liverpool and the Mersey, Volume 1: Gladstone Dock and the Great Liners by Ken Longbottom, 1995.

Liverpool and the Mersey, Vol. 1: Gladstone Dock and the Great Liners

More than 190 rare archive photographs and maps, many never before published, recount the story of this most famous dock and the Great passenger Ships that were once a regular sight there.

 

Front Cover and Spine, North Atlantic Passenger Liners since 1900 by Nicholas T. Cairis, 1972.

North Atlantic Passenger Liners Since 1900

Material about the most prominent steamship companies on the Atlantic Ferry today and those that have been there for some time. Some Lines have diverse services to other oceans, seas, and continents.

 

Front Cover, Ocean Liner Collectibles with Price Guide by Myra Yellin Outwater, Photographs by Eric Boe Outwater, 1998.

Ocean Liner Collectibles

This book recreates the ambiance of the ocean linereraby showing the actual objects used on board. Each piece of ocean-liner memorabilia is like an aladdin's lamp, releasing wondrous memories of that grand style of travel.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Ocean Liners of the 20th Century by Gordon Newell, 1963.

Ocean Liners of the 20th Century

This book imparts a bit of the glamor, majesty, and color of the most exciting things ever built by man: the Ocean Liners. Brief histories of most of the major shipping companies presently operating passenger liners are included.

 

Front Cover, Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970 by John Adams, 1993.

Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970

A history of the steam-powered passenger ship that details its story from the SS Savannah of 1819 to the SS Hamburg of 1969. It contains historical details of all civilian vessels built in the intervening years, with numerous illustrations and previously unpublished material.

 

Front Cover, Passenger Liners Of The World Since 1893 By Nicholas T. Cairis, Revised Edition With Over 200 pictures, 1979.

Passenger Liners of the World Since 1893

The author here takes a nostalgic look back to the heyday of the passenger ship, providing a brief history of 211 ships of over 10,000 tons, together with specifications and technical details of each.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Passenger Ships of the World, Past and Present by Eugene W. Smith, 1963.

Passenger Ships of the World - 1963

Passenger Ships of the World, 1963, represents an incredible resource covering passenger ships that are Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Pacific, Trans-Pacific via Panama Canal, Latin American, Africa and the Eastern Oceans, and California-Hawaii.

 

Front Cover, Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994 by William H Miller, Jr., 417 Photographs, 1995.

Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994

One of the most comprehensive pictorial references on ocean liners ever published, this superb chronicle by noted maritime historian William H. Miller, Jr., depicts and describes virtually every passenger ship of over 15,000 tons built between 1860 and the late 1900s.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships by William H. Miller, Jr., 2002.

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships is a superbly illustrated volume that documents a long line of great ships--from "floating palaces" such as the Imperator (1913) and the Vaterland (1914) to such luxurious cruise ships as the Statendam (1957), Hamburg (1969), the remodeled Bremen (1990), and the new Deutschland (1998).

 

Front Cover and Spine Plus, The Atlantic Liners 1925-70 by Frederick Earl Emmons, 1972.

The Atlantic Liners 1925-1970

THE ATLANTIC LINERS will be cherished by all the millions of Americans who love the sea. Frederick Emmons sketches the histories of every ocean liner that sailed between the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1970.

 

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Fleet of the Holland-America Line - 1908

  • Twin screw Steamship "Nieuw Amsterdam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Noordam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Ryndam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Potsdam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Statendam"

Ranging from 10,500 to 17,500 tons net register, and the New Twin Screw Steamship "Rotterdam" of 24,170 tons Register, 37,190 tons Displacement.

All steamships are of enormous tonnage, and splendidly equipped for the safety and comfort of passengers. They are all provided with the latest improvements, have bilge keels, superb decks, halls, saloons and large staterooms, and are fitted with the Marconi system for wireless telegraphy and the Submarine Signal Receiving Apparatus. They carry the U. S. and Royal Netherlands Mails and maintain a regular weekly service between New York and Rotterdam, stopping both ways at Boulogne-sur-Mer for the landing and embarking of passengers.

 

Fleet of the Holland-America Line - 1915

The Fleet of Holland-Americ Line. SS Nieuw Amsterdam Passenger List, 29 May 1915.

The Fleet of Holland-Americ Line. SS Nieuw Amsterdam Passenger List, 29 May 1915. GGA Image ID # 1e01b0f9c9

 

  • Twin Screw Steamship "Rotterdam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Nieuw Amsterdam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Noordam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Ryndam"
  • Twin screw Steamship "Potsdam"
  • Triple screw Steamship "Statendam"

They range from 12,351 to 24,170 tons gross register, whereas Triple screw Steamship "STATENDAM" of 32,500 tons is building.

All steamships are of enormous tonnage and splendidly equipped for the safety and comfort of Passengers. They are all provided with the latest improvements, have bilge keels, superb decks, halls, saloons, and large staterooms, and are fitted with the Marconi system of wireless telegraphy and the Submarine Signal Receiving Apparatus. They carry the U.S. and Royal Netherlands Mails and maintain a regular weekly service between New York and Rotterdam, stopping both ways at Boulogne-sur-Mer for the landing and embarkation of Passengers. Moreover, S.S. "ROTTERDAM" and "NIEUW AMSTERDAM" will, on the eastbound voyage, the ship calls at Plymouth for the landing of Passengers to Great Britain.

For complete information, sailings, and rates, please apply to the Passenger Offices of the Holland-America Line or its local Agents.

 

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