RMS Majestic Archival Collection

 

The White Star Line Majestic Enters the King George V Graving Dock at Southampton on 19 January 1934.

The White Star Line Majestic Enters the King George V Graving Dock at Southampton on 19 January 1934. GGA Image ID # 1d63e8a933

 

 

 

Majestic (1890) White Star Line

Postcard of the White Star Line RMS "Majestic," 10,000 Tonnage, 582 Ft. Length, 57'8 Ft. Breadth, 17,000 IHP.

Postcard of the White Star Line RMS "Majestic," 10,000 Tonnage, 582 Ft. Length, 57'8 Ft. Breadth, 17,000 IHP. GGA Image ID # 1d7b9773c7

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 9,861. Dimensions: 566' x 57' (582' o.l.). Twin-screw, 20 knots. Triple expansion engines. Three masts and two funnels. Launched: June 29, 1889. Cost $2,000,000 to build. Maiden voyage: Liverpool-New York, April 2, 1890. Speed Records: Broke the trans-Atlantic speed record. Her power plant contained 16 boilers and were heated by 76 furnaces, which enabled the engines to develop 17,500 indicated horse-power. Alterations: Main mid mizzen masts were removed in 1902, and an intermediate mast installed instead. Retirement-Reactivation: She was retired from active service in 1912. However due to the tragic loss of the Titanic in April of that year, she was put back in service as a replacement. Fate: Broken up for scrap at Morecambe in 1914. Sister ship: Teutonic.

 

Majestic (1921) White Star Line

The RMS Majestic (1921) of the White Star Line. New York-Cherbourg-Southampton in Under Six Days.

The RMS Majestic (1921) of the White Star Line. New York-Cherbourg-Southampton in Under Six Days. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11dcb226ec

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 56,551. Dimensions: 915' x 100' (956' o.l.). Quadruple- screw, 24 knots. Eight steam turbines. Two masts and three funnels. Note: Launched as the Bismarck (Hamburg-American Line) on June 20, 1914. However, was not completed until after the First World War. From keel to top of funnels 183 feet high. From keel to boat deck 102 feet. She had a draft of 38'-10". When the liner was finished, she was handed over to the British Shipping Controller, who sold her to the White Star Line. Maiden voyage: Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, May 10, 1922. Speed: Made a fast Atlantic crossing in June 1922, at an average speed of 24.2 knots. Made her final sailing from New York, as an Atlantic liner, February 22, 1936. Acquired by the British Admiralty in 1936. Renamed: Caledonia (1936). Fate: Used as a training ship. Gutted by fire and sunk at Rosyth, September 29, 1939. The hulk was refloated, and subsequently broken up for scrap. Ex-Bismarck (1922).

 

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Passenger Manifest, SS Majestic, White Star Line, August 1905, Liverpool to New York

1905-08-30 RMS Majestic Passenger List

First Class Passenger List for the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing 30 August 1905 from Liverpool to New York via Queenstown (Cobh), Commanded by Captain B. F. Hayes, Lt. RNR.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Second Class Passenger List - 6 September 1922.

1922-09-06 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Second Class Passenger List for the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing 6 September 1922 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain Sir Bertram Hayes.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic First Class Passenger List - 7 May 1924.

1924-05-07 RMS Majestic Passenger List

First Class Passenger List from the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing 7 May 1924 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain Sir Bertram Hayes, K.C.M.G., D.S.O., R.D. (Commodore R.N.R., Retd., and Commodore White Star Line Fleet).

 

Front Cover, White Star Line SS Majestic Tourist Third Cabin Passenger List - 5 June 1926.

1926-06-05 SS Majestic Passenger List

Tourist Third Cabin Passenger List from the SS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Saturday, 5 June 1926 from New York to Southampton via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain G. R. Metcalfe, Lt. Cdr. RNR, Retd.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic First Class Passenger List - 24 August 1927.

1927-08-24 RMS Majestic Passenger List

First Class Passenger List from the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 24 August 1927 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain G. R. Metcalfe, Lt. Cdr. RNR, Retd.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Tourist Third Cabin Passenger List - 15 August 1928.

1928-08-15 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Tourist Third Cabin Passenger List from the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 15 August 1928 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain G. R. Metcalfe (Lt. Cdr., RNR, Retd.).

 

Front Cover, White Star Line SS Majestic First Class Passenger List - 20 April 1929.

1929-04-20 SS Majestic Passenger List

First Class Passenger List from the SS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing 20 April 1929 from New York to Southampton via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain W. Marshall, CB, DSO, RD (Commodore RNR). 19 Senior Officers and Staff Members Listed.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Second Cabin Passenger List - 4 September 1929.

1929-09-04 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Second Cabin Passenger list for the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 4 September 1929, from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Commodore W. Marshall. 17 Senior Officers and Staff Members Listed.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Second Class Passenger List - 1 October 1930.

1930-10-01 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Second Class Passenger List from the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 1 October 1930 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain E. R. White, RD (Cdr., RNR, Retd.). 19 Senior Officers and Staff Members Listed.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Tourist Class Passenger List - 10 August 1932.

1932-08-10 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Tourist Passenger List from the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 10 August 1932 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain E. L. Trant, RD, (Cdr., RNR, Retd. and Commodore, White Star Line). 17 Senior Officers and Staff Members Listed.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Tourist Class Passenger List - 23 August 1933.

1933-08-23 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Tourist Passenger List for the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 23 August 1933 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain E. L. Trant. 17 Senior Officers and Staff are Listed.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Tourist Class Passenger List - 8 August 1934.

1934-08-08 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Tourist Passenger List from the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 8 August 1934 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain E. L. Trant, RD (Cdr., RNR Retd., and Commodore, White Star Line). 17 Senior Officers and Staff Members are Listed.

 

Front Cover, White Star Line RMS Majestic Tourist Class Passenger List - 4 September 1935.

1935-09-04 RMS Majestic Passenger List

Tourist Passenger List for the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line, Departing Wednesday, 4 September 1935 from Southampton to New York via Cherbourg, Commanded by Captain R. B. Irving, OBE, RD, RNR.

 

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Front Cover, 1907 White Star Line Brochure Covering Their Fleet, History, Accommodations, and Services.

1907 - White Star Line Fleet, History, and Services

Excellent brochure from the White Star Line covering all three classes of services at the height of the transatlantic immigrant trade. Profusely illustrated with many photographs of the ships and accommodations.

Featured Ships: Arabic, Athenic, Baltic, Canopic, Cedric, Celtic, Corinthic, Cretic, Cymric, Ionic, Majestic, Oceanic, Republic, Romanic, Runic, and Teutonic.

 

Front Cover, The Steamers of the White Star Line, ca. 1909. From the Chris Crofts Collection.

The Steamers of the White Star Line - 1909

A 1909 Brochure from the White Star Line is a Pictorial Featuring the Olympic and Titanic, Adriatic, Baltic, Canopic, Celtic, Laurentic and Megantic, Majestic and Teutonic, Romanic, Oceanic, Zeeland, and more.

 

Front Cover of 1922 Brochure Majestic - The World's Largest Ship from the White Star Line.

1922 - RMS Majestic - The World's Largest Ship

One of the most exceptional brochures issued by the New York Office of the White Star Line. It covers the first-class accommodations with a visual record of the grand luxury of the public areas, dining saloon, lounges with a few photographs of the elegant second class accommodations.

 

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Front Cover, A Century of Sea Travel: Personal Accounts from the Steamship Era by Christopher Deakes and Tom Stanley, 2010.

A Century of Sea Travel: Personal Accounts from the Steamship Era

This book is a voyage through the life of the passenger steamship, a voyage described by travellers who sailed on these vessels, and it carries within it their thoughts and experiences, mirrored here in words and pictures.

 

Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan & Majestic

Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic

Conceived in the period of German maritime expansion in the tumultuous years just before the First World War, the construction of the Imperator, Vaterland and Bismarck represented an attempt by one man, the shipping genius Albert Ballin, to monopolize the lucrative Hamburg-New York passenger traffic with his Hamburg American line, destined to become the world's largest shipping line.

 

Front Cover, Cunard: Glory Days by David L. Williams, © 1999.

Cunard: Glory Days (1999)

Cunard -- few names in the maritime industry are more redolent of the great days of ocean-going passenger liners and cruise ships. This book recalls the era when ocean travel by liner was at its height and the 'Queens' ruled the waves with page after page of beautiful photographs that tell its story. Glory Days: Cunard provides a vivid reminder of the lost grandeur of ocean travel.

 

Front Cover, Doomed Ships: Great Ocean Liner Disasters by William H. Miller, Jr., 2006.

Doomed Ships: Great Ocean Liner Disasters

Naval historian William H. Miller, Jr. recounts the dramatic stories behind various ill-fated passenger ships. He takes readers beyond the newspaper headlines and formal inquiries, offering firsthand accounts of heroic rescues, daring escapes, and tragic losses.

 

Front Cover, Era of the Passenger Liner by Nicholas T. Cairis. Published by Pegasus Books Ltd., London, 1992.

Era of the Passenger Liner - 1992

The Gilded Era comes back to life as the reader relives the careers of stately ships and express greyhounds from immigrant ships to floating palaces. Scarce, large format book containing 288pp. Features photographs, statistics, and background of 280 passenger liners, each with a picture.

 

Front Cover, The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs, 193 Views, 1897-1927.

The First Great Ocean Liners in Photographs - 1983

Sumptuous volume recalls the glorious early years of elegant transatlantic travel. Over 190 historic photographs depict exterior and interior views of 101 great ocean liners, including the Virginian, Imperator, Vaterland, Bismarck, Lusitania, Mauretania, Balmoral Castle, Titanic, Olympic, Aquitania and dozens more. Full captions.

 

Front Cover, The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4, by Melvin Maddocks, 1978.

The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4

A history of the world's famous luxury liners provides portraits of the ships. It examines such great disasters as the sinking of the Titanic. This edition explores the grand hotels that traversed the Atlantic between 1840 and 1930.

 

Front Cover, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 1: 1858-1912 by Arnold Kludas, Translated from the German by Charles Hodges, 1975.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1858-1912

This initial volume deals with Ships from 1858-1912, from the first passenger ship of over 10,000 GRT to be placed in service (the Great Eastern) to those unforgettable sister ships, the Olympic and Titanic — the first of more than 40,000 GRT.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 2: 1913-1923 by Arnold Kludas, 1976.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1913-1923

The period 1913-1923 is dealt with in this second volume. Although it was only a decade, it was one of the most turbulent passenger ships in history. Competition to produce ever-larger vessels declined between leading North Atlantic shipping companies. For 20 years, the ships of the Imperator Class were the largest in the world.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Harland & Wolff: Designs from the Shipbuilding Empire by Tom McCluskie, 1998.

Harland & Wolff: Designs from the Shipbuilding Empire

The book is an introductory overview of the company, its shipyards, and its works is followed by 44 detailed drawings of the ships, from the earliest sailing vessels to the great liners such as the Canberra and the Southern Cross.

 

Front Cover,  Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 2

Leviathan: "The World's Greatest Ship" Volume 2

Volume 2 picks up the LEVIATHAN saga during her monumental conversion from a troop ship to a luxury liner and carries the ship’s tempestuous life up through her first round trip as a U.S. express liner. The book finishes with the SS Leviathan's triumphant return to the Atlantic.

 

Front Cover, Liverpool and the Mersey, Volume 1: Gladstone Dock and the Great Liners by Ken Longbottom, 1995.

Liverpool and the Mersey, Vol. 1: Gladstone Dock and the Great Liners

More than 190 rare archive photographs and maps, many never before published, recount the story of this most famous dock and the Great passenger Ships that were once a regular sight there.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Majesty at Sea: The Four-Stackers by John J. Shaum, Jr. and William H. Flayhart III, 1981.

Majesty at Sea: The Four Stackers

The opulent and luxurious four-funnel passenger liners, of which only fourteen have ever been built, are unsurpassed in maritime history. Built between 1897 and 1921, these great vessels vied with each other in their standards of comfort, spaciousness, and speed, and great was the rivalry between their owners.

 

Front Cover, Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970 by John Adams, 1993.

Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970

A history of the steam-powered passenger ship that details its story from the SS Savannah of 1819 to the SS Hamburg of 1969. It contains historical details of all civilian vessels built in the intervening years, with numerous illustrations and previously unpublished material.

 

Front Cover, Ocean Steamships: Popular Account Of Their Construction Development, Management And Appliances By Gould, Rideing, Seaton, Chadwick, Kelley and Hunt, 1891.

Ocean Steamships - 1891

With Ninety-six Illustrations. Few books will leave the press during this holiday season that are as solid and satisfying in their matter and as sumptuous in their form as this volume—over 30 High-Quality Images. Follow the Book' Description.

 

Front Cover, Passenger Liners Of The World Since 1893 By Nicholas T. Cairis, Revised Edition With Over 200 pictures, 1979.

Passenger Liners of the World Since 1893

The author here takes a nostalgic look back to the heyday of the passenger ship, providing a brief history of 211 ships of over 10,000 tons, together with specifications and technical details of each.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Passenger Ships of the World, Past and Present by Eugene W. Smith, 1963.

Passenger Ships of the World - 1963

Passenger Ships of the World, 1963, represents an incredible resource covering passenger ships that are Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Pacific, Trans-Pacific via Panama Canal, Latin American, Africa and the Eastern Oceans, and California-Hawaii.

 

Front Cover, Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994 by William H Miller, Jr., 417 Photographs, 1995.

Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994

One of the most comprehensive pictorial references on ocean liners ever published, this superb chronicle by noted maritime historian William H. Miller, Jr., depicts and describes virtually every passenger ship of over 15,000 tons built between 1860 and the late 1900s.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of British Ocean Liners 1900 to the Present by William H. Miller, 2001.

Picture History of British Ocean Liners: 1900 to the Present

Over 200 rare black-and-white illustrations provide views of the ships at sea and in port, glimpses of lavish staterooms, lounges, dining areas, onboard photos of celebrities and royalty, and much more.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships by William H. Miller, Jr., 2002.

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships is a superbly illustrated volume that documents a long line of great ships--from "floating palaces" such as the Imperator (1913) and the Vaterland (1914) to such luxurious cruise ships as the Statendam (1957), Hamburg (1969), the remodeled Bremen (1990), and the new Deutschland (1998).

 

Front Cover, Picture History of the Cunard Line 1840 - 1990 by Frank O. Braynard and William H. Miller, Jr., 1990.

Picture History of the Cunard Line 1840 - 1990

The Picture History of the Cunard Line 1840 - 1990 has over 180 photographs and illustrations showing the liners on the high seas and in port and depicting handsome staterooms, lounges, interior decor, and carefree life aboard ship.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of the Queen Mary And Queen Elizabeth By William H. Miller, Jr., 2004.

Picture History of the Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth

Powerful and fast Atlantic liners of the 1930s, this volume is packed with high-quality vintage photographs of the RMS Queen Mary and RMS Queen Elizabeth, from construction to heyday to eventual decline and their successor ships bearing the same name.

 

Front Cover: Picture History of the SS United States by William H. Miller, Jr.

Picture History of the SS United States

A comprehensive pictorial record of the SS United States that will appeal to maritime historians, this celebration of an American champion and centerpiece of national pride will also captivate ship lovers and anyone thrilled by sea travel.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Steamships and Their Story by E. Keble Chatterton with 153 Illustrations, 1910.

Steamships and Their Story

This book provides, in a narrative free from technical terms, a complete history of the development of steamships, showing the evolution of the modern ocean greyhound from the earliest experiments in marine engineering. The illustrations form a unique feature of this handsome volume.

 

Front Cover, The American Line: 1871-1902 by William Henry Flayhart III

The American Line: 1871-1902 (2000)

The American Tine tells the story of the first successful American steamship line after the Civil War to rival the great European transatlantic companies—an essential and glorious chapter in the history of the American Merchant Marine.

 

Front Cover and Spine Plus, The Atlantic Liners 1925-70 by Frederick Earl Emmons, 1972.

The Atlantic Liners 1925-1970

THE ATLANTIC LINERS will be cherished by all the millions of Americans who love the sea. Frederick Emmons sketches the histories of every ocean liner that sailed between the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1970.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Tourist Third Cabin: Steamship Travel in the Interwar Years by Lorraine Coons and Alexander Varias, 2003.

Tourist Third Cabin: Steamship Travel in the Interwar Years

Ocean Liners and New Vistas of Interwar Society From Immigrants to Tourists. The Changing Complexion of Translatlantic Passengers as The Soul of a Ship. Experience and Life of Below-Deck Personnel Traveling Palace or Floating Sweatshop. The Experience of Women Seafarers Projecting an Image: The Allure of Transatlantic Travel.

 

Hardback Front Cover and Spine, Transatlantic: Samuel Cunard, Isambard Brunel, and the Great Atlantic Steamships by Stephen Fox, 2003.

Transatlantic and the Great Atlantic Steamships

A stirring narrative of the rapid development of the great transatlantic steamships, from paddle-wheelers to the sleek luxury greyhounds of the modern era -- and the men who designed and ran them.

 

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Information for Passengers - 6 September 1922

Landing Arrangements at New York. Should the Steamer arrive at the New York Wharf after 8:00 pm, Passengers may land if they wish to do so and have their baggage passed by the Customs Authorities immediately on arrival, but those who prefer to remain on board may do so and have the whole of their Baggage passed the following morning not earlier than 7 o'clock.

Breakfast will be served to those who remain on board overnight.

Uniformed representatives of the American railroads meet all steamers on arrival at New York. Railroad tickets may be purchased and baggage checked from the steamship Pier to any point along the Lines of the Pennsylvania, New York Central, Erie, Lehigh Valley, and connecting railroads.

Smoking is strictly prohibited in any of the Staterooms, Reading and Writing Room, or Dining Saloon.

Seats at Table. Passengers who have not previously arranged for seats at table to be reserved should apply for same to the Saloon Steward.

Medical Attendance. The Surgeon is Authorised To Make Customary Charges, Subject in Each Case To The Approval of The Commander, for Treating Passengers at Their Request for Any Illness Not Originating On The Voyage. in The Case of Sickness Developed On The Voyage NO Charge WILL Be MADE, and MEDICINE WILL Be PROVIDED Free in ALL CIRCUMSTANCES.

Charges PAID on Board. Passengers are requested to ask for a Receipt on the Company's Form for any additional Passage Money, Chair or Steamer Rug Hire, or Freight paid on Board.

Deck Chairs and Steamer Rugs can be hired on application at a charge of 7/6 each for the voyage.

Valuables. The particular attention of Passengers is drawn to the ticket conditions regarding the carriage and custody of articles specified in Section 4281 of the revised Statutes of the United States, but Passengers can, and are accordingly advised to, protect themselves by insurance. The Line has provided a safe in the office of the Purser in which Passengers may deposit money, jewels, ornaments, documents or other valuables for safe keeping and a deposit receipt will be issued by the Purser.

Exchange of Money. The Purser is prepared, for the convenience of Passengers, to exchange a limited amount of English, and American money, at rates which will be advised on application.

Travellers' Cheques, payable in all parts of Europe, can be purchased at all the principal offices of the White Star Line. These Cheques are accepted on board White Star steamers in payment of accounts,but the Pursers do not carry funds to enable them to cash same.

Deck Games and Amusements. Deck Quoits, Shuffleboard, Bull Board and other games are provided on deck under the charge of a Quartermaster.

Chess, Draughts, Dominoes, etc., may be obtained on application to Saloon Steward.

Passengers'Quarters. Second Class Passengers are not allowed to enter First or Third Class compartments, or vice versa, as complications might arise under the Quarantine Regulations.

The Barber is allowed the privilege of selling various souvenirs and small articles on his own account.

Picture Postcards. Picture Postcards of the steamer can be obtained gratis on application on Board.

High Seas Mail.—On all British steamers British Postage Stamps and rates are used when mailing letters for European points, and such letters should be posted in the ship's letter box in the ordinary way.

The mail bag is closed a few hours previous to arrival. Full particulars can be obtained at the Enquiry Office upon application.

Long Range Wireless Service. This vessel is fitted with special long range wireless apparatus which will enable the ship to communicate with the shore throughout the voyage across the North Atlantic Ocean.

When the ship is nearing the American and Canadian shores, messages can also be forwarded through the ordinary wireless coast stations situated on the Atlantic seaboard.

Ocean Letters. The Marconi Company have inaugurated an "Ocean Letter" service, by which messages may be sent from one ship to another going in an opposite direction, for delivery by Registered Post from the first port of call of the latter vessel.

Time On Shipboard. On the voyage from Europe, owing to the alteration in time as the ship proceeds Westward, it is necessary to put the clock back every 24 hours. The alteration in time is made at about midnight, and the clock is usually put back from 35 to 45 minutes on each occasion, the exact amount of time depending upon the distance the ship is estimated to make by noon the next day. During the first 24 hours, however, owing to the change from Mean Time to Apparent Time, the alteration is likely to be consider- ably more than 45 minutes, especially while Summer Time is in use.

Innovation Trunks. Passengers are advised that it is not always possible to arrange for the placing of Innovation Trunks in the passenger accommodation in a position where they are easily accessible, also that there is frequently difficulty with regard to the landing of such packages owing to their exceptional size. They are therefore recommended to me steamer trunks in preference.

Orchestra. The " Majestic " carries an Orchestra of skilled musicians, which will play daily at the undermentioned times and places :

  • 11:00 am to 12 noon and 2.30 pm to 3.30 pm : Second Class Dining Saloon

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 6 September 1922

 

Information for Passengers - 7 May 1924

Lights are extinguished in the Saloon at 11:00 pm, Lounge midnight (Sundays 11:30 pm), and Reading and Writing Room at 11:30 pm

SMOKING. Passengers are kindly requested not to smoke in the Dining Saloon.

SEATS AT TABLE. Passengers who have not previously arranged for seats at table to be reserved should apply for same to the Second Steward.

When the steamers sail with full lists, children under the age of ten years not paying the adult fare are provided with meals at separate sittings in the Dining Saloon.

MEDICAL ATTENDANCE, The surgeon is authorized to make customary charges, subject in each case to the approval of the commander, for treating- passengers at their request for any illness not originating on the voyage. in the case of sickness developed on the voyage, no charge will be made, and medicine will be provided free in all circumstances.

The Hours for Consultation are as follows :— 10:00 am; 6:00 pm; and 8:30 pm, but the Surgeon is available at all times in case of urgency.

AN ENQUIRY OFFICE has been provided for the convenience of Passengers where all enquiries for Information of a general character can be made.

Letters Cables, Telegrams and Marconigrams are received here for despatch, and Postage Stamps can be purchased, and Deck Chairs and Steamer Rugs hired at this office, through which also all Mails will be distributed. Postage Stamps can also be obtained from the Lounge Steward.

CHARGES COLLECTED ON BOARD. Passengers are requested to ask for a Receipt on the Company s Form for any additional Passage Money, Chair or Steamer Rug Hire, charges collected for Marconigrams, Cablegrams or Telegrams or Freight paid on board.

PASSENGERS' ADDRESSES may be left at the Enquiry Office, in order that any letters received after passengers have left the steamer may be forwarded.

DECK CHAIRS and STEAMER RUGS can be hired on application at the Enquiry Office, at a charge of 6/6 (or $1.50) each for the voyage.

VALUABLES. The particular attention of passengers is drawn to the ticket conditions regarding tbf carriage and custody of articles specified in Section 4.281 of the revised Statutes of the United States, but passengers can, and are accordingly advised to protect themselves by insurance.

The Line has provided a safe in the office of the Purser in which passengers may deposit money jewels- ornaments, documents or other valuables for safe keeping and a deposit receipt will be issued by the Purser.

EXCHANGE OF MONEY. The Purser is prepared, for the convenience of passengers, to exchange a limited amount of English and American money at rates which will bo advised on application.

BAGGAGE. Questions relating to Baggage should be referred to the Baggage Master. Trunks, Chairs, etc., which Passengers may desire to leave in charge of the Company, should be appropriately labeled and handed to the Baggage Master on the Wharf at New York, and such articles will be stored entirely at owner's risk. It is for passengers themselves to see all their baggage is passed by the U.S. Customs Authorities on landing.

AUTOMOBILE TOURS. Arrangements have been made whereby passengers by the White Star Line can hire automobiles to meet them on arrival of the stoamer at Liverpool or Southampton for tours in the British Isles or on the Continent. Orders may be sent from America or Canada through the White Star Offices or direct from the steamer by the aid of the Marconi Wireless Telegraph.

Chess, Draughts, Dominoes etc., can be obtained on application to the Lounge Steward.

PASSENGERS' QUARTERS. First Class passengers are not allowed to enter Second or Third Class compartments, or vice versa, as complications might arise under the Quarantine Regulations.

BOOTS AND SHOES. These will be cleaned if left outside the Stateroom door.

PROHIBITION IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. In consequence of the decision of the U.S. Supreme Court prohibiting the entry into their ports of alcoholic liquors, only limited supplies of Wines and Spirits, etc., can be placed on board on the Westbound, voyages.

BARBER, LADY HAIRDRESSER, AND LADY MANICURIST are provided. The Barber's hours are from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm, but for the general convenience of the greater number, passengers are requested not to apply for hair-cutting or shampooing except between the hours of noon and 5:00 pm

RESTAURANT.—In addition to the Regular Dining Saloon there is a Large modern à la carte Restaurant, on Deck B, where meals may be obtained at any time between 8:00 am and 11:00 pm at fixed charges, as shown on the Bill of Fare issued from day to day.

Passengers wishing to use the Restaurant should apply on board to the Manager for the reservation of tables.

In the event of Passengers who have booked for meals in the Restaurant of the "Majestic " being invited by friends to join them in the main saloon, such can be arranged at fixed charges, providing, of course, seate are available there.

PALM COURT.—Adjoining the Restaurant is the Palm Court, a magnificent apartment decorated in the style of the Italian Renaissance and with a coiling 20 feet high supported by eight columns. Light refreshments may be obtained at fixed charges.

READING and WRITING ROOM.—0n Deck B, forward, furnished in the style of the Adams Brothers. Here are well stocked Bookcases, and Books may be obtained on application to the Steward in charge.

By special arrangement with Harrods' Library, a supply of recent works is placed on board each voyage, as a supplement to the permanent collection of standard works.

SMOKING ROOM.—On Deck A, forward, with large square glass windows giving a magnificent view towards the bow and also to the side of the steamer. This room is decorated in the style of the English Renaissance and is panelled in light stained oak, richly carved.

DINING SALOON.—On Deck F, is the loftiest ever built in any ship, its height being 31 feet, and there is a floor area of 4,600 square feet.

The magnificent painted dome and the decorations of the apartment have received special attention, the lighting effect being very pleasing. The seating arrangements in the Dining Saloon are unrivaled,

878 persons can be seated at once, and tables are provided for 2, 4 or more persons to enable all requirements to be met.

SWIMMING BATH.—The Swimming Bath, with ample accommodation for bathers, including 30 dressing rooms, also a gallery for spectators, is situated on Deck G, and will be available FREE with use of Costume until 12:30 pm for—

  • Gentlemen from 6:00 am. to 9:00 am ... Free.
  • Ladies from 10:00 am. to 12.30 p.m---- Free
  • Ladies & Gentlemen from 2:00 pm to 7:00 pm 2/6 (58 cents.)

The Swimming Instructress is allowed to make a charge for lessons given on application, but not for ordinary assistance rendered.

ELECTRIC BATHS.—Fully equipped Electric Bathe (also situated on Deck G) with experienced attendants in charge, available by appointment.

Tickets 5/6 ($1.25), obtainable at the Enquiry Office.

GYMNASIUM.—Fully supplied with modern appliances, located on Deck A, and is open for exercise by Ladies, Gentlemen and Children during the following hours :—

  • Gentlemen ... ... from 6:00 am to 9:00 am
  • Ladies ... ... from 10:00 am to 12 noon.
  • Ladies and Gentlemen from 12 noon to 1:00 pm
  • Children ... ... from 2:00 pm to 3.30 pm
  • Ladies and Gentlemen from 3.30 pm to 7:00 pm

LOUNGE.—On Deck B, amidships, intended for the use of both Ladies and Gentlemen. This popular room is the centre of social intercourse on board. Here afternoon tea and after-dinner coffee will be served, while liqueurs, cigars and cigarettes may be purchased, if desired.

Postage Stamps can also be obtained from the Lounge Steward.

The Lounge has an area of 2,410 square feet, a height of 26 feet, and the area of the Glass Dome is 1,500 square feet.

A Special DANCING FLOOR has been laid in this apartment.

CARD ROOM.—On Deck B, an innovation which will prove exceedingly popular amongst enthusiasts who like a quiet rubber free from the distractions unavoidable in apartments not solely devoted to the game.

PASSENGER ELEVATORS—Three Elevators are provided, two of which are situated in the main Companionway amidships, and one in the forward Companionway running between Decks A, B, C, D, E and F.

A CLOTHES PRESSING ROOM is in charge of an expert attendant, who will carry out any work of this kind for Ladies or Gentlemen, in accordance with a fixed printed tariff of charges which can be had on application at the Enquiry Office.

HOT AND COLD WATER.—All First Class Staterooms are fitted with hot and cold fresh water supply.

STENOGRAPHER.—An experienced Stenographer is carried, and his services are at the disposal of passengers at a fixed printed tariff of charges, which can be had on enquiry at the Purser's Office.

LANDING ARRANGEMENTS AT NEW YORK

Should the steamer arrive at the New York Wharf after 8:00 pm, Passengers may land if they wish to do so and have their hand baggage passed by the Customs Authorities immediately on arrival, but those who prefer to remain on board may do so and have the whole of their baggage passed the following morning not earlier than Seven o'clock. Breakfast will be served to those who remain on board overnight.

Upon landing at New York and upon application to the uniformed representatives of the railroads, who meet all steamers, railroad tickets may be purchased and baggage checked from the Steamship Pier to any point along the Lines of the Pennsylvania, New York Central, New York, New Haven, and Hartford, Erie, Lehigh Valley, Baltimore and Ohio, Delaware, Lackawanna and Western and Central Railroad of New Jersey, and connecting railroads.

Passengers destined to New York City, or nearby points will find on the Pier representatives of the New York City Transfer, who will arrange for the expeditious transfer of baggage to hotels, railroad terminals or residences.

Professional Gamblers. The attention of the Managers has been called to the fact that certain persons, believed to be professional gamblers, are in the habit of traveling to and fro in Atlantic Steamships.

In bringing this to the knowledge of travelers, the Managers, while not wishing in the slightest degree to interfere with the freedom of action of patrons of the White Star Line, desire to invite their assistance in discouraging games of chance, as being likely to afford these individuals special opportunities for taking unfair advantage of others.

LETTERS, ETC., FOR PASSENGERS. Will be brought on board before the Passengers land. Passengers should personally ascertain whether there is any mail for them before disembarking, and they are invited to leave their addresses at the Enquiry Office for any later despatches to be re-directed.

THE " Majestic " carries an Orchestra of skilled musicians which will play daily at the undermentioned times and places

  • 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm First Class Lounge
  • 9:00 pm to Midnight First Class Lounge
  • 8:30 pm to 11:00 pm (Sundays) First Class Lounge

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 7 May 1924

 

Information for Passengers - 5 June 1926

SMOKING. Passengers are kindly requested not to smoke in either the Dining Saloon or in the Reading and Writing Room.

It is also desired that ladies should refrain from using the smoking room.

SEATS AT TABLE. Passengers who have not previously arranged for seats at table to be reserved should apply to the Chief Third Cabin Steward.

UPPER BERTHS. Passengers occupying upper berths can obtain steps for getting in or out of same on applying to the Steward or Stewardess.

THE PURSER'S OFFICE is situated on Deck E, where Letters, Cables, Telegrams and Marconigrams are received or delivered, and Postage Stamps can be purchased.

DECK CHAIRS AND STEAMER RUGS can be hired on application to the Deck Steward, at a charge of 6/6 (or $1.50) each for the voyage.

VALUABLES. For the convenience of Passengers, the Line has provided in the Purser's Office, a Safe in which money, jewels, ornaments, documents or other valuables may be deposited by Passengers. A receipt for any articles so deposited will be issued by the Purser, but the Line does not, having regard to the ticket conditions and to the provisions of Section 502 of the Merchant Shipping Act 1894 and of Section 4281 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, accept any responsibility for the safe custody of any such articles. Passengers are accordingly advised to protect themselves by insurance.

DOGS. Passengers are notified that dogs must be handed over to the care of the live-stock attendant, and cannot be landed in Great Britain unless a license has previously been procured from the Board of Agriculture, London. Forms of license must be obtained by direct application to the Department before the dog is taken on board.

SPECIAL NOTICE for Round Trip Tourist Passengers

Passengers holding return tickets who are undecided about their European addresses should advise same to our nearest office in Europe by mail or in person as soon as possible after arrival abroad. If this is done by letter, please mention sailing on which you will return and accommodation reserved for you.

All passengers holding return tickets are requested to communicate with our nearest office at least a week in advance of their sailing from Europe so that necessary formalities may be arranged in connection with their return passage.

CHERBOURG—Passengers are landed by tender up to 12 o'clock midnight, but if the Ship arrives later, they will disembark at 7:00 in the morning. A special train will be run as soon as possible after landing.

SOUTHAMPTON—A Special Train will be despatched for London on the arrival of the steamer, when justified by the number of passengers, if able to leave Southampton docks not later than 9:30 pm

Should the steamer arrive at her berth at Southampton after 7:30 pm those passengers desiring to do so may remain on board until the following morning, when they will be landed after breakfast.

Source: SS Majestic Passenger List - 5 June 1926

 

Information for Passengers - 24 August 1927

LANDING ARRANGEMENTS AT NEW YORK

Should the steamer arrive at the New York Wharf after 8:00 pm, all passengers who have been passed by the U.S. Immigration Authorities may land or remain on board overnight, at their own option.

Those passengers who have been passed by the Immigration Authorities and desire to remain on board may have all their baggage passed by the U.S. Customs that night or the following morning, at their Own option.

No baggage will be passed before 7:00 am the day following arrival. Breakfast will be served to those who remain on board overnight.

In the event of the Steamer Arriving at Quarantine After the Hours Mentioned Hereunder Passengers, Other Than United 8tate8 Citizens, May Be Required by the U.S. Immigration Authorities to Remain on Board Overnight and to Have Their Passports Examined the Following Morning:—

  • October to December Inclusive 5:30 pm
  • January to March Inclusive 6:00 pm
  • April to June Inclusive 7:30 pm
  • July to September Inclusive 7:15 pm

Breakfast Will Be Served in the Usual Course.

Passengers destined to New York City, or nearby points, will find on the Pier, representatives who will arrange for the expeditious transfer of baggage to hotels, railroad terminals or residences.

MEDICAL ATTENDANCE, the surgeon is authorized to make customary charges, subject in each case to the approval of the commander, for treating passengers at their request for any illness not originating on the voyage. in the case of sickness developed on the voyage no charge will be made, and medicine will be provided free in all circumstances.

AN ENQUIRY OFFICE has been provided for the convenience of passengers where all enquiries for information of a general character can be made.

DECK CHAIRS and STEAMER RUGS can be hired on application at the Enquiry Office, at a charge of (or $1.50) each for the voyage.

DECK CHAIR CUSHIONS. A limited supply of Cushions, with loose covers, for Deck Chairs is available for hire at a charge of 6/6 (or $1.50) each for the voyage.

PRECIOUS STONES or other similar articles of merchandise may not be taken as baggage, but all passengers must deliver such goods to the Purser of the vessel. The Pursers are instructed to furnish passengers with a receipt for merchandise so delivered and place the goods in the safes aboard their vessel until a Customs permit is presented to the Inspectors ordering the goods into the U.S. appraiser's stores for examination,

STENOGRAPHER. An experienced Stenographer is carried, and his services are at the disposal of passengers at the following charges :—

  • 2 1/2 d. or 5 cents per folio (72 words).
  • 1d. or 2 cents per folio for carbon copies.
  • 1s. 6d. or 40 cents (minimum) for a letter.

Particulars can be obtained at the Enquiry Office.

THE "MAJESTIC" carries an Orchestra of skilled musicians which will play daily at the undermentioned times and places—

  • 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm - - - First Class Lounge
  • 9:00 pm to Midnight - - - First Class Lounge
  • 8:30 pm to 11:00 pm (Sundays) - First Class Lounge

Source: SS Majestic Passenger List - 24 August 1927

 

Information for Passengers - 15 August 1928

DECK CHAIRS and STEAMER RUGS can be hired on application to the Deck Steward, at a charge of 4/- (or $1) each for the voyage.

DOGS. Passengers are notified that dogs must be handed over to the care of the butcher.

LECTURES. For the purposes of private lectures the White Star Line will be pleased to loan sets of slides as well as a priuted lecture in cases where desired by Tourist passengers who may wish to lecture in Great Britain and Ireland upon their experiences and visits to the United States and Canada.

LANDING CARDS. Before leaving the vessel the holder must present his or her Landing Card to a U.S. Immigrant Inspector for endorsement.

SPORTS DEPARTMENT. For the convenience of our patrons interested in sport or sporting events on either side of the Atlantic we have established a special department in our London West End Office.

It will be the duty of this department to supply information, obtain facilities, and establish associations in respect to any sport or sporting events, and be generally useful in this connection to our patrons, who, we trust, will not hesitate to take full advantage of the arrangements we have made.

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 15 August 1928

 

Information for Passengers - 20 April 1929

PASSENGERS SHOULD PERSONALLY ASCERTAIN whether there is any mail for them before disembarking, and they are invited to leave their addresses at the Enquiry Office for later despatches to be re-directed.

MOVING PICTURES. Moving Picture showings will be given in the Lounge as announced from time to time.

DOGS AND CATS. Passengers are notified that dogs or cats cannot be landed in Great Britain unless a license has previously been procured from the Board of Agriculture, London. Forms of license must be obtained by direct application to the Department before the animal is taken on board.

PUBLIC TELEPHONES with booths and operators on our New York piers.

AUTOMOBILES FOR TOURING ABROAD. Special facilities for the care of automobiles are available for passengers desiring to take their cars on the same steamer or in advance. All necessary Customs Passes, Licenses, etc., can be had on application to Automobile Department, 1 Broadway, New York City or through Agents.

BARBER, LADY HAIRDRESSER, AND LADY MANICURIST are provided. The Barber's hours are from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm

Do you want to FLY To Paris? If you desire to speed to Paris by Airplane from Cherbourg, make application to the Purser, who will make the necessary arrangements.

CARD ROOM—On Promenade Deck, an innovation which will prove exceedingly popular amongst enthusiasts who like a quiet rubber free from the distractions, unavoidable in apartments not solely devoted to the game.

PASSENGER ELEVATORS—Three Elevators are provided, two of which are situated in the main Companionway amidships, and one in the forward Companionway running between Sun, Promenade, A, B, C, and D Decks.

A CLOTHES PRESSING ROOM is in charge of an expert Attendant, and work of this kind will be carried out for Ladies and gentlemen.

Source: SS Majest Passenger List - 20 April 1929

 

Information for Passengers - 4 September 1929

Cinematograph Performances. Cinematograph performances will be given in the Saloon as notified from time to time.

COTS. The steamers are supplied with a limited number of Cots for the use of Infants. Applications for same should be made to the Chief Steward.

Exchange of Money. The Purser is prepared for the convenience of Passengers, to exchange a limited amount of English and American money, at rates which will be advised on application.

A Gymnasium,*fully equipped with modern appliances, is situated on Deck B, and is open for exercise by Ladies, Gentlemen and Children, as follows

  • 6:00 am to 9:00 am for Gentlemen only
  • 10:00 am to 12 Noon for Ladies only
  • 12 Noon to 1:00 pm for Ladies and Gentlemen
  • 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm for Children
  • 3-30 p m. to 7:00 pm for Ladies and Gentlemen

NO Charge is MADE for The USE of The Appliances.

* The Company accept no responsibility whatsoever for any accident from whatever cause arising to any passenger using the Gymnasium.

Poste Radiotelegrams. These messages are accepted for transmission to a selected vessel for mailing on arrival in port. This service provides a most economical channel of communication with friends and relatives on shore when full rate facilities are not desired.

Portholes. As it is dangerous for Passengers to handle the Ports, they are requested to ask the Bedroom Steward to open and close the Portholes in the Staterooms as required.

Orchestra. The " Majestic" carries an Orchestra of professional musicians, which will play regularly in the Second Class.

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 4 September 1929

 

Information for Passengers - 1 October 1930

DANCING. A special dancing floor has been laid in the Entrance Hall on Deck " B."

RECEPTION OFFICER. For the convenience of passengers not fully conversaut with the English language, the Company has appointed to this steamer a RECEPTION OFFICER able to converse in the majority of European languages, and whose services are at the disposal of passengers, if required.

Enquiry for the Reception Officer should bo made at the Purser's Office, and it is hoped that passengers will not hesitate to avail of his services.

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 1 October 1930

 

Information for Passengers - 23 August 1933

Deck Chairs and Rugs can be hired at a charge of 5/1- (or $1) each for the voyage on application to the Chief Tourist Steward.

Customs Examination of Baggage in British Ports. All articles liable to Customs duties, whether worn or used or not, however small the quantity, must be declared, and in any case of doubt as to the liability of any articles in their possession tourists are advised to consult the Customs Officer and show him the articles.

A list of the principal articles liable to duty is shown to Passengers by the Customs Officers and Customs Notices containing similar lists are exhibited in prominent places on board ship for the information of Passengers. These lists include Tobacco in all forms, Spirits, Scent (including toilet waters), Articles of Apparel of all kinds, Clocks, Watches, Cameras, Binoculars, Jewellery and many other goods.

Articles in personal use and wear in the baggage of tourists may be passed free of duty provided they are declared, and the Customs Officer is satisfied that they are personal belongings, and reasonable allowances are made in regard to other personal effects.

Small quantities of Tobacco, Spirits and. Scent for personal use may also be passed free if duly declared.

Travellers who are unable to be present at the examination of their baggage may depute a personal servant or other agent to present the baggage for examination, but in such cases a written declaration in the prescribed Customs Form 2 B must be filled up and signed by the owner of the baggage.

In Great Britain and Northern Ireland arrangements can be made with the Customs to meet the case of tourists who have in their possession dutiable goods which cannot be passed free of duty. In such cases, the duty may under certain conditions be lodged on deposit on arrival and the amount is returned by the Customs at the port or place of departure on production of the articles and the receipt for the deposit.

Customs Officers may waive the payment of duty if they are satisfied by the production of a through return railway or steamer ticket or a passport showing residence outside the United Kingdom, or other evidence, that the passenger is merely passing through the United Kingdom. The articles must be bona fide the property of the passenger, intended for his or her personal wear or use, or as gifts to persons in the overseas country of ultimate destination and must be reasonable in the circumstances of the case.

Wireless Telegram Rates. This vessel is fitted with Marconi system of Wireless Telegraphy and also with Submarine Signalling Apparatus.

The Orchestra will play daily and music will be provided after dinner each evening by the Electrical Reproducer.

Stewards Speaking Foreign Languages. Stewards speaking a number of European languages are available for the convenience of Passengers and may be identified by the badge worn on the lapel of their coat bearing the flag of the country the language of which they speak.

Dance Music. The Orchestra will play daily at times to suit the convenience of Passengers and to conform to the programme arranged for the day, but generally at the following times :-

  • 4:00 pm to 5 p.m
  • 8:00 pm to 9 p.m
  • 9:30 pm to 11.30 p.m

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 23 August 1933

 

Information for Passengers - 8 August 1934

CHECKING BAGGAGE ON ARRIVAL AT NEW YORK.

Arrangements can be made with the Baggage Master on board the vessel to check baggage to all points in Greater New York. Jersey City and Hoboken, including railroad terminals, hotels, residences, express companies or warehouses, but all packages must be cleared by the owner of the baggage through the Customs after landing.

Passengers are thus relieved of this detail after disembarking. Please apply at the Purser's Office for rates and further information regarding this service.

EXCHANGE OF MONEY. For the convenience of passengers the Purser is able to exchange a limited amount of English, American and Canadian money at rates which will bo advised on application.

DECK CHAIRS AND RUGS can be hired at a charge of 5/- each for the voyage on application to the Chief Tourist Steward.

A REGISTERED NURSE is on board, whoso services are available, as necessary, under the direction of the ship's Surgeon.

FIRE PRECAUTIONS. Passengers are respectfully reminded that the careless disposal of lighted cigar, cigarette or pipe rofuse and matches may lead to serious consequences. Throwing lighted cigarette or cigar ends overboard may also prove dangerous, and passengers are requested to use the receptacles provided for the purpose in the passenger accommodation and on the decks.

LANDING ARRANGEMENTS : NEW YORK. Should the vessel arrive at the New York Wharf after 8:00 pm, all passengers who have been passed by the U.S. Immigration Authorities may land or remain on board overnight, at their own option.

Those passengers who have been passed by the Immigration Authorities and desire to romain on board may have all their baggage passed by the U.S. Customs that night or the following morning, at their own option.

No baggage will be passed before 8:00 am the day following arrival. Breakfast will bo served to those who romain on board overnight.

Taxicabs can bo hired at the New York Piers. It is suggested to passengers for their own protection that Terminal Cabs which come within the pier gates, afford comfort and protection as regards baggage, etc., at legal rates.

Passengers are advised to enquire at the Desks on the Piers for letters and telegrams.

THE ORCHESTRA will play daily and music will be provided after dinner each evening by the Electrical Reproducer.

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 8 August 1934

 

Information for Passengers - 4 September 1935

Automobiles. In order to facilitate Customs Clearance uncrated automobiles must be included on the U.S. Declaration Form.

Baggage in Bond. Passengers en route to destinations outside the U.S.A. or Canada may have their checked baggage forwarded “In Bond” to a frontier point under Customs Manifest without examination of the contents by a Customs Officer at port of disembarkation. The Purser or Baggage Master will be pleased to supply information.

Catering. Passengers are invited to advise the Tourist Steward of their preference in the matter of diet and cooking and they can be assured of every attention being given to their wishes. Cooks of various nationalities are included in the kitchen personnel.

Cuisine. We ask passengers to kindly make known their preference in the Tourist Steward as kitchen or diet: the more attention will be paid to satisfy them. Kitchen staff includes Heads of various nationalities.

Cheques. Passengers are respectfully advised that the Purser cannot accept private cheques.

Changes In Accommodation. The Purser alone is authorized to make changes in accommodation and may only do so on payment of any difference in fare which may be required according to Company’s tariffs.

Customs Examination. All articles liable to Custom Duty must be declared. Any passenger who is in doubt should see the Purser or Baggage Master who will provide the latest information available.

U.S. Customs. All passengers are required to make a declaration of personal baggage for the U.S. Customs Authorities at the port of landing. Blank declaration forms are obtainable from the Purser. Returning Residents must declare all articles acquired abroad but wearing apparel and personal effects taken overseas from the U.S. in the first case are entitled to be passed free of duty upon return.

An exemption of $100.00 worth of purchases is allowed each returning resident, subject to certain conditions which will be detailed by -the Customs Officer. Visitors may take in free of duty wearing apparel and personal effects not intended for sale, but must declare all articles not included in this category. Severe penalties are imposed upon persons who make false declarations as to value, ownership or use of articles or who attempt to bribe or recompense a Customs Officer,

Divine Service is held each Sunday at 11:00 am in one of the Public Rooms.

There are frequent celebrations of Mass, according to the Roman Catholic Rite, fully equipped altars being available and facilities being placed at the disposal of Priests traveling in the ship.

Fire And Lifeboat Stations. Passengers are earnestly requested to acquaint themselves with the notice in the staterooms regarding lifeboat and fire stations.

Importation Of Liquor. A considerable quantity of liquor imported in the baggage of passengers is purchased “ in bond ” at a price below the regular market value of the country of purchase, and for that reason attention is called to the fact by the Collector, U.S. Customs Service, that the above market value must be ascertained and declared by the passenger instead of the price actually paid.

Library. The ship has a fully equipped library and passengers are invited to borrow the volumes—no charge will be made.

Rotarians traveling by this ship are invited to inspect the Rotary Register at the Purser’s office and subscribe their name? The Purser will be glad, providing circumstances permit, to anange an informal Rotary Luncheon during the voyage.

Source: RMS Majestic Passenger List - 4 September 1935

 

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Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 30 August 1905.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 30 August 1905. GGA Image ID # 1dd418c135

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log. RMS Majestic Passenger List, 6 September 1922.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log. RMS Majestic Passenger List, 6 September 1922. GGA Image ID # 1dd15f4943

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 7 May 1924.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 7 May 1924. GGA Image ID # 1dd16d1e06

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). SS Majestic Passenger List, 24 August 1927.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). SS Majestic Passenger List, 24 August 1927. GGA Image ID # 1dd24a14e7

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 15 August 1928.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 15 August 1928. GGA Image ID # 1dd2e62998

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). SS Majest Passenger List, 20 April 1929.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). SS Majest Passenger List, 20 April 1929. GGA Image ID # 1dd33b46c7

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 1 October 1930.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 1 October 1930. GGA Image ID # 1dd3919910

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 10 August 1932.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 10 August 1932. GGA Image ID # 1dd3dfeeeb

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 23 August 1933.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 23 August 1933. GGA Image ID # 1dd3f02b5e

 

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 8 August 1934.

Track Chart and Memorandum of Log (Unused). RMS Majestic Passenger List, 8 August 1934. GGA Image ID # 1dd4116e79

 

Return to Content Links

 

 

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-Boston, and Boston-Mediterranean Service, from 18 June 1904 to 8 October 1904.

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-Boston, and Boston-Mediterranean Service, from 18 June 1904 to 8 October 1904. Ships Included the Arabic, Baltic, Canopic, Cedric, Celtic, Cretic, Cymric, Majestic, Oceanic, Republic, Romanic, and Teutonic. RMS Celtic Passenger List, 19 August 1904. GGA Image ID # 1e4efde338

 

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-New York Service, from 6 July 1904 to 13 January 1905.

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-New York Service, from 6 July 1904 to 13 January 1905. Ships Included the Arabic, Baltic, Cedric, Celtic, Majestic, Oceanic, and Teutonic. RMS Celtic Passenger List, 19 August 1904. GGA Image ID # 1e4e8ea9b7. Click to View Larger Image.

 

White Star Line American and Colonial Services. Proposed Sailings from 22 August 1905 to 28 October 1905.

White Star Line American and Colonial Services. Proposed Sailings from 22 August 1905 to 28 October 1905. Ships Include the Arabic, Baltic, Canopic, Cedric, Celtic, Cretic, Cymric, Majestic, Oceanic, Republic, Romanic, and Teutonic. MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE—The "Arabic" sails from New York on Feb. 8th, 1906, for an extended Cruise to the Mediterranean under charter to Mr. F. C. Clark and will call at Madeira, Cadiz, Gibraltar, Algiers, Malta, Athens (Phaleron Bay), Constantinople, Smyrna. Haifa, Jaffa, Alexandria, Naples, and Villefranche, returning thence via Liverpool to New York, particulars on application to any of the Company's offices. RMS Majestic Passenger List, 30 August 1905. GGA Image ID # 1dd41e606f

 

White Star Line Liverpool-New York Service from 18 August 1905 to 10 January 1906.

White Star Line Liverpool-New York Service from 18 August 1905 to 10 January 1906. Ships Include the Baltic, Cedric, Celtic, Majestic, and Teutonic. Special Trains for Passengers leave Easton Station. London, direct to Riverside Station, Liverpool, in connection with the above sailings, or Passengers may leave by the 10:00 a.m. Fast Express from St. Paneras. RMS Majestic Passenger List, 30 August 1905. GGA Image ID # 1dd49614e0. Click for Larger Image.

 

American and Colonial Services, Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-Boston, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, and New York-Boston-Mediterranean, from 21 August 1906 to 28 October 1906.

American and Colonial Services, Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-Boston, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, and New York-Boston-Mediterranean, from 21 August 1906 to 28 October 1906. Ships Included the Arabic, Baltic, Canopic, Cedric, Celtic, Cretic, Cymric, Majestic, Oceanic, Republic, Romanic, and Teutonic. MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE,—The "Arabic" sails from New York about February 7th, 1907, for an extended Cruise to the Mediterranean under charter to Mr. F. C. Clark, and will call at Madeira, Cadiz, Gibraltar, Algiers, Malta, Athens (Phaleron Bay), Constantinople, Smyrna, Caifa, Jaffa, Alexandria, Naples, and Villefranche, returning thence via Liverpool to New York. RMS Cymric Passenger List, 7 September 1906. GGA Image ID # 1e550c39be

 

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-New York Service, from 4 May 1906 to 9 January 1907.

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-New York Service, from 4 May 1906 to 9 January 1907. Ships Included the Baltic, Cedric, Celtic, Majestic, Oceanic, and Teutonic. RMS Cymric Passenger List, 7 September 1906. GGA Image ID # 1e55bda7dd. Click to View Larger Image.

 

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-New York Service, from 1 May 1907 to 6 December 1907.

Sailing Schedule, Liverpool-New York Service, from 1 May 1907 to 6 December 1907. Ships Included the Adriatic, Arabic, Baltic, Cedric, Celtic, Majestic, Oceanic, and Teutonic. RMS Republic Passenger List, 14 August 1907. GGA Image ID # 1e58351d4c

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York Service, from 5 August 1908 to 13 January 1909.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York Service, from 5 August 1908 to 13 January 1909. Ships Included the Adriatic, Majestic, Oceanic, and Teutonic. Information and Fares for Cross-Channel Passages is also Listed. SS Romanic Passenger List, 4 October 1908. GGA Image ID # 1e57207633

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York Service, from 5 May 1909 to 8 December 1909.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York Service, from 5 May 1909 to 8 December 1909. Ships Include the Adriatic, Majestic, Oceanic, and Teutonic. Rates for Cross-Channel Passages and Railway Fares are also Listed. RMS Arabic Passenger List, 11 June 1909. GGA Image ID # 1e4b05d9fa

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York Service, from 22 June 1910 to 11 January 1911.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York Service, from 22 June 1910 to 11 January 1911. Ships Included the Adriatic, Majestic, Oceanic, and Teutonic. RMS Cymric Passenger List, 26 July 1910. GGA Image ID # 1e560cb675

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 7 June 1911 to 6 January 1912.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 7 June 1911 to 6 January 1912. Ships Included the Adriatic, Majestic, Oceanic, Olympic, and St. Paul. SS Canopic First Class Passenger List, 23 July 1911. GGA Image ID # 211f985a63

 

White Star Line Express Mail Service Between Soutampton, Cherbourg, and New York from 9 August 1922 to 3 January 1923.

White Star Line Express Mail Service Between Soutampton, Cherbourg, and New York from 9 August 1922 to 3 January 1923. Service Maintained by the RMS Majestic, RMS Olympic, and RMS Homeric. RMS Majestic Passenger List, 6 September 1922. GGA Image ID # 1dd4b5c677

 

Sailing Schedule, Express Mail Service Between Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 22 August 1923 to 2 February 1924.

Sailing Schedule, Express Mail Service Between Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 22 August 1923 to 2 February 1924. Ships Included the Canopic, Homeric, Majestic, Olympic, and Pittsburgh. RMS Homeric Passenger List, 5 September 1923. GGA Image ID # 1f0ab3dab9

 

WSL Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York and New York-Cherbourg-Southampton, from 4 April 1925 to 28 November 1925.

WSL Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York and New York-Cherbourg-Southampton, from 4 April 1925 to 28 November 1925. Ships Included the Homeric, Majestic, and Olympic. Back Cover, SS Homeric Second Class Passenger List, 4 April 1925. GGA Image ID # 20b6f106f5

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 21 May 1924 to 10 January 1925.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 21 May 1924 to 10 January 1925. Ships Included the Canopic, Homeric, Majestic, Olympic, Pittsburgh, and Zeeland. White Star Line RMS Olympic First Class Passenger List - 4 June 1924. GGA Image ID # 207345c3ef

 

Sailing Schedule, White Star Line Express Mail Service, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 30 April 1925 to 26 September 1925.

Sailing Schedule, White Star Line Express Mail Service, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 30 April 1925 to 26 September 1925. Ships Included the Arabic, Belgenland, Homeric, Lapland, Majestic, Olympic, Pittsburgh, and Zeeland. RMS Celtic Passenger List, 30 May 1925. GGA Image ID # 1e5245b658

 

Proposed Sailings, White Star Line, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 3 July 1926 to 27 November 1926.

Proposed Sailings, White Star Line, Liverpool-Queenstown (Cobh)-New York, from 3 July 1926 to 27 November 1926. Ships Included the Homeric, Majestic, and Olympic. RMS Belgenland Passenger List, 26 June 1926. GGA Image ID # 1df234cffb

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 25 January 1928 to 8 December 1928.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 25 January 1928 to 8 December 1928. Ships Included the Albertic, Homeric, Majestic, Megantic, and Olympic. RMS Baltic Cabin Class Passenger List, 3 March 1928. GGA Image ID # 20c168c3d4

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 23 May 1928 to 17 November 1928.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York, from 23 May 1928 to 17 November 1928. Ships Included the Homeric, Majestic, and Olympic. SS Doric Passenger List, 19 May 1928. GGA Image ID # 206c022e20

 

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York and Liverpool-New York, from 1 August 1928 to 10 November 1928.

Sailing Schedule, Southampton-Cherbourg-New York and Liverpool-New York, from 1 August 1928 to 10 November 1928. Ships Included the Adriatic, Baltic, Cedric, Celtic, Homeric, Majestic, and Olympic. SS Lapland Passenger List, 31 August 1928. GGA Image ID # 1ebe71055b

 

Westbound Sailings of the White Star Line from 6 October 1934 to 2 February 1935.

Westbound Sailings of the White Star Line from 6 October 1934 to 2 February 1935. Ships Included the Alaunia, Antonia, Aquitania, Ascania, Athenia, Aurania, Ausonia, Berengaria, Britannic, Carinthia, Franconia, Georgic, Laconia, Lancastria, Laurentic, Letitia, Majestic, Olympic, Samaria, Scythia, and Transylvania. The Schedule Includes Originating, Calling, and Destination Ports for Each Voyage. RMS Britannic Passenger List, 6 October 1934. GGA Image ID # 1e3159e0ee

 

Eastbound Sailings of the White Star Line from 6 October 1934 to 14 February 1935.

Eastbound Sailings of the White Star Line from 6 October 1934 to 14 February 1935. Ships Included the Alaunia, Antonia, Aquitania, Ascania, Athenia, Aurania, Ausonia, Berengaria, Britannic, Carinthia, Doric, Franconia, Georgic, Laconia, Lancastria, Laurentic, Letitia, Majestic, Olympic, Samaria, Scythia, and Transylvania. The Schedule Includes Originating, Calling, and Destination Ports for Each Voyage. RMS Britannic Passenger List, 6 October 1934. GGA Image ID # 1e3178f51a

 

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White Star Line Services to the United States, August 1905.

White Star Line Services to the United States, August 1905. RMS Majestic Passenger List, 30 August 1905. GGA Image ID # 1ea4dec5e3

 

We have pleasure in calling attention to the services maintained by the White Star Line to the United States, in addition to the regular sailings between LIVERPOOL and NEW YORK, viz.:—

  • LIVERPOOL and BOSTON (Calling at Queenstown),
  • ALSO, BETWEEN NEW YORK & BOSTON & MEDITERRANEAN PORTS,

These Services are conducted by modern Twin- Screw Steamers:—

  • ARABIC 15,801 Tons
  • CYMRIC 13,096 Tons
  • REPUBLIC 15,378 Tons
  • CANOPIC 12,096 Tons
  • CRETIC 13.500 Tons
  • ROMANIC 11.400 Tons

which are among the largest, fastest, and finest steamers in the Mediterranean Service. They regularly sail throughout the year to and from Liverpool and Boston (calling at Queenstown), or to and from New York or Boston and Mediterranean Ports.

See the annexed sailing schedules giving the departures as at present arranged.

The attention of Passengers holding return tickets by the White Star Line is especially drawn to the choice of the route thus offered, return tickets being available for their total value towards passage by any of the White Star Services.

Facilities will be offered for booking by the most attractive routes across the Continent between the various ports of call in the Mediterranean and Liverpool, which will thus enable passengers to book the round trip from New York or Boston via the Mediterranean, returning from Liverpool or vice versa.

ISMAY, IMRIE &. CO.
Liverpool, August 1905.

 

White Star Line RMS Homeric, 34,356 Tons, Sailing in Conjunction with the RMS Majestic and RMS Olympic Maintaining a Weekly Express Mail Service Between Southampton, Cherbourg, and New York.

White Star Line RMS Homeric, 34,356 Tons, Sailing in Conjunction with the RMS Majestic and RMS Olympic Maintaining a Weekly Express Mail Service Between Southampton, Cherbourg, and New York. RMS Majestic Passenger List, 6 September 1922. GGA Image ID # 1ea503074d

 

White Star Line 1923 Express Service Between Southampton-Cherbourg-New York by the Big Three.

White Star Line 1923 Express Service Between Southampton-Cherbourg-New York by the Big Three: RMS Majestic at 56,551 Tons The Largest Steamer in the World. (Record Trip from New York to Cherbourg), RMS Olympic (Triple Screw), 46,439 Tons, and the RMS Homeric at 34,356 Tons, Maintain a Weekly Mail Service. RMS Homeric Passenger List, 5 September 1923. GGA Image ID # 1f08fc590e

 

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AN increased force of men have been put to work on the new White Star steamship Majestic at the shipbuilding yards in Belfast, where her construction progresses, and it is not improbable she may make her maiden trip to this port before the close of the year.

-- Ocean: Magazine of Travel, Vol. III, No. 2, September 1889

 

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BIGGEST LINER HERE WITH A WORLD RECORD

Majestic Docks at White Star Pier After Maiden Voyage of 5 1/2 Days.

HUGE BUT EASY TO HANDLE

Though Largest Ship In World, She Turns Around Readily in Narrows.

Completing its maiden voyage from Southampton in 5 days, 14 hours, and 45 minutes, the Majestic of the White Star Line is the world's largest ship. She steamed up New York harbor yesterday afternoon and received from smaller craft the tribute due to a new monarch of the seas.

Sirens blew, and flags dipped as the 56,000-ton liner, majestic in appearance and name, passed by on the way to its pier, the longest port. From the Battery to the White Star piers at the foot of Twenty-third Street, thousands waved from office windows and wharves. Overhead Aeromarine planes encircled and acted as aerial escorts.

Apart from the Majestic's size, the steamer's maneuverability won the greatest admiration from observers.

Under the command of Captain Sir Bertram Hayes, with Pilot A. H. Peterson, the ship accomplished a feat seldom attempted by large steamers: turning around in the Narrows after weighing anchor at the conclusion of the Quarantine examination.

Usually, vessels proceed to Gravesend Bay, where there is plenty of room to negotiate a sweeping turnaround. But the Majestic, as If on a pivot, with only one tug assisting, swung around in the half-mile-wide Narrows and started upstream.

One hour and fifteen minutes after weighing anchor, the Majestic had warped into her pier, and the gangplank was down. The actual docking required only twenty-five minutes, which means the beam was off the pier end until the vessel was tied up.

 

Ten Tugs Puff Away at Giant

A favorable tide made the berthing of the ship a comparatively easy task. Ten tugboats, dwarfs pitting their strength against a giant, puffed away in turning the Majestic into the pier slip.

Just as the Majestic was ranging alongside the pier to a position behind the pier head shed as close as possible, the nose of the vessel crashed into the corrugated side of the shed.

Though the Majestic was scarcely moving, the impact tore away about fifteen feet of the outer covering of the shed. The damage, according to officials, amounted only to a few hundred dollars.

Moored several feet from the shore bulkhead, the ship's stern projected forty-one feet into the Hudson beyond the solid pier, which is 923 feet long. Scows were placed at the stern to protect the quadruple screws. At night red lights will be hung to warn river craft to keep clear.

The official average speed reported during the trip was 22.63 knots an hour. Still, it was said unofficially that the Majestic, at times, plowed through the seas at the rate of 23 knots.

It was suggested by shipping men that the Majestic bids fair to be a contender with the Cunarder Mauretania for the speed record across the Atlantic. The Mauretania made a trip in four days, ten hours, and forty-one minutes.

"We must let the Majestic loaf along. There was no attempt to push her," said Captain Sir Bertram Hayes, the Commodore of the White Star Line of steamers." she handles well, and we experienced no trouble on the way over. We are after no speed records. Our job Is to carry passengers safely across the Atlantic."

Harold A. Sanderson, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, the corporate name of the White Star Line, who was a passenger, said the performance of the Majestic on the maiden voyage was highly satisfactory.

"The ship can steam twenty-five knots easily; how much more we do not know nor do we intend to find out for the present," he said. " There will be no attempt to push the vessel."

 

Full Power Not Used

Officials of the Belfast Ship Works had that the commander did not use the full power of the boilers. One said that great care had to be used in handling the ship on the Initial trip because should any trouble develop, there was no accessible dry-dock in either the United States or England where an examination could be made.

Just as the Majestic arrived at Quarantine, the Mauretania and Reliance left for Europe. While their flags dipped to the new boat, passengers lined the rail and waved to those aboard the Majestic.

The Majestic is 956 feet long and has a beam of 100 feet. Her depth from the bridge to the keel is 102 feet. With nine decks, above which project four superstructure decks, the giant vessel presented a tidy appearance that won favorable comments.

She is of the three-funneled oil-burner type. Forty-eight boilers, with 240 furnaces, provide the power to .turn the triple screws. The promenade is said to be the most extensive on any ship. Four times around equals a mile.

The Majestic has accommodation for 4,100 passengers and a crew of 1,000. There are 1,245 staterooms aboard, including many suites, the largest of which consists of eight rooms and three baths.

A few of the ship's features include a lounge 76 feet long and 57 feet wide, a dining room 117 by 98 feet, and a Pompeian swimming bath of S30 square feet.

Invitations have been sent out by the White Star Line for an inspection of the new liner tomorrow.

 

-- The New York Times, May 17, 1922

 

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RMS Majestic Twin-Screw, 10,000 Tons Steamship of the White Star Line.

RMS Majestic (1890) Twin-Screw, 10,000 Tons Steamship of the White Star Line. White Star Line Famous Big 4, 16 April 1909.GGA Image ID # 144698dbb1

 

The RMS Majestic, Twin-Screw, 10,000 Tons.

The RMS Majestic, Twin-Screw, 10,000 Tons. GGA Image ID # 123a961d6e

 

The Twin-Screw Sister Ships SS Majestic (1890) and SS Teutonic (1889).

The Twin-Screw Sister Ships SS Majestic (1890) and SS Teutonic (1889). Steamers of the White Star Line, 1909. From the Chris Crofts Collection. GGA Image ID # 210fccd10d

 

Immigrants on Board the RMS Majestic on Her Maiden Voyage to New York.

Immigrants on Board the RMS Majestic on Her Maiden Voyage to New York. Sir Thomas Ismay, William Lionel Wyllie, His Wife and Son Were Also Passengers on this Voyage. Illustration by William Lionel Wyllie (1851-1931). The Graphic Newspaper, 1890. GGA Image ID # 1e3f1d15a0

 

Entrance to the Lounge Showing Oak Paneling.

Entrance to the First Class Lounge Showing Oak Paneling. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11dd98d6a1

 

Lounge Ceiling of Carved Wood and Crystal.

First Class Lounge with Ceiling of Carved Wood and Crystal. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11ddb1af63

 

Elegant à la Carte Restaurant.

Elegant First Class à la Carte Restaurant. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11de246492

 

Palm Court Showing Approach to Restaurant.

First Class Palm Court Showing Approach to Restaurant. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11de26b9a7

 

Foyer and Entrance to First Class Lounge.

Foyer and Entrance to First Class Lounge. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11de98b86e

 

Spacious Reading and Writing Room.

Spacious First Class Reading and Writing Room. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11df21d54a

 

Lofty Central Hall of First-Class Dining Saloon.

Lofty Central Hall of First-Class Dining Saloon. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11df70188a

 

One Side of the First-Class Dining Saloon.

One Side of the First-Class Dining Saloon. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11dfb39f9e

 

Splendid Pompeian Swimming Bath.

Splendid First Class Pompeian Swimming Bath. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11dfdefadc

 

Old-World Hall Style Smoking Room.

Old-World Hall Style First Class Smoking Room. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11dffb4056

 

View Through Sun Verandah in a Regal Suite.

View Through Sun Verandah in a First Class Regal Suite. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e01718e5

 

Sun Verandah with Window Flower Garden.

First Class Sun Verandah with Window Flower Garden. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e03f4f26

 

Drawing Room in One of the Many Suites.

First Class Drawing Room in One of the Many Suites. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e0480d9d

 

Regal Suite Bedroom with Inlaid Walls.

First Class Regal Suite Bedroom with Inlaid Walls. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e04ae780

 

Two-Bed Stateroom with Connecting Bath.

First Class Two-Bed Stateroom with Connecting Bath. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e07b69b1

 

Typical Single-Bed Stateroom.

Typical First Class Single-Bed Stateroom. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e0887830

 

Passengers Exercising in the Gymnasium Using Varied Equipment.

Passengers Exercising in the First Class Gymnasium Using Varied Equipment. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e0bb0a39

 

An Attractive Second-Class Lounge.

An Attractive Second-Class Lounge. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e0d4c196

 

View of the Second-Class Smoking Room.

View of the Second-Class Smoking Room. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e0d58e3d

 

Second Class Dining Saloon - Light and Airy.

Second Class Dining Saloon - Light and Airy. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e1244ea4

 

Second Class Stateroom with Outside Light.

Second Class Stateroom with Outside Light. Majestic - The World's Largest Ship, 1922. GGA Image ID # 11e146fbb0

 

Mrs. Ada B. Hicks and Dr. C. H. Muncie on Board the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line circa 1925.

Mrs. Ada B. Hicks and Dr. C. H. Muncie on Board the RMS Majestic of the White Star Line circa 1925. Photo by Bain News Service. Library of Congress LCN 2014716350. GGA Image ID # 1e3d00525d

 

Photograph shows Efrem Zimbalist, Sr. and Mr. Crowninshield, circa 1925 on the RMS Majestic.

Photograph shows Efrem Zimbalist, Sr. (1889 or 1890-1985), an internationally known concert violinist, composer, teacher, conductor, and director of the Curtis Institute of Music. He is the Father of Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., an American Actor Known for His Roles in the Television Series 77 Sunset Strip and The F.B.I. Photo by Bain News Service. Library of Congres LCN 2014716080. GGA Image ID # 1e3da94e28

 

Violinist Fritz Kreisler (1875-1962) and His Wife Harriet Lies Kreisler (1869-1963) Aboard the RMS Majestic circa 1925.

Violinist Fritz Kreisler (1875-1962) and His Wife Harriet Lies Kreisler (1869-1963) Aboard the RMS Majestic circa 1925. Bain News Service. Library of Congress LCN 2004667615. GGA Image ID # 1e3e31f44b

 

The RMS Majestic Docked at its New York Pier circa 1925.

The RMS Majestic Docked at its New York Pier circa 1925. Photo by Bains News Service. Library of Congress LCN 2014714481. GGA Image ID # 1e3d2cba06

 

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White Star Line RMS Majestic Travel Poster, 1922.

White Star Line RMS Majestic Travel Poster, 1922. GGA Image ID # 1e3e0662cd

 

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Advertisement for the Majestic, Olympic, and Homeric Offering Weekly Sialings in Tourist Third Cabin between New York, Cherbourg, and Southampton, c1930.

Advertisement for the Majestic, Olympic, and Homeric Offering Weekly Sialings in Tourist Third Cabin between New York, Cherbourg, and Southampton, c1930. GGA Image ID # 1ea438846f

 

The Olympic, 46,439 Tons Carries Tourist Third Cabin On All Sailings.

THE TOURIST DINING SALOON is a most attractive room finished in dignified oak paneling. Located on D deck, high in the ship, and furnished with fine linen and silver, it provides exactly the environment to make the meal time a pleasure.

THE TOURIST SMOKING ROOM. also on C deck, provides an atmosphere of solid comfort in which to enjoy the company of one's fellow passengers. Here you will find contestants worthy of your skill at chess, checkers, dominoes, bridge, or other games.

Much of the pleasure of the ocean crossing is found on deck. The OLYMPIC'S broad decks provide ample space for chairs, promenading and a variety of interesting sports devised for the entertainment of passengers at sea.

THE TOURIST LOUNGE, a bright cheerful apartment on C deck, is an attractive gathering place for the many social activities of the crossing. Games of many kinds are available and books from its well-stocked library may be used without charge.

The MAJESTIC, OLYMPIC, and HOMERIC Offer Weekly Sailings in Tourist Third Cabin between New York and Cherbourg - Southampton.

 

White Star Line Majestic 56,000 Tons (The World's Largest Steamer), and Homeric 35,000 Tons Are Nearing Completion.

White Star Line Majestic 56,000 Tons (The World's Largest Steamer), and Homeric 35,000 Tons Are Nearing Completion. These Magnificent Vessels Will Shortly Take Their Place in the Southampton-Cherbourg-New York Service. RMS Baltic Passenger List, 10 September 1921. GGA Image ID # 1ea467a064

 

 

I NEVER saw such public interest in a ship as Americans have shown in the Majestic," said Captain Sir Bertram Haye*, commander of the world's largest vessel, when his command was at New York on her second voyage, June 18-17. "The demonstration when we came up the Hudson on our first voyage exceeded anything I have known, and I have seen a few. The public has shown this voyage by visits, letters, and other ways ", to say nothing of our bookings, that the ship has made a tremendous hit."

Thousands applied for passes to visit the vessel while in port. Public men from New York and other cities, prominent bankers and railroad executives, city and Federal officials, and railroad and steamship freight agents were guests of President P. A. S. Franklin of the International Mercantile Marine Company at dinner on the Majeatie at Pier 59. at New York on the evening of June 15.

 

The Main Saloon on the Majestic. The Ceiling is 31 Feet High, the Loftiest on Any Ship.

The Main Saloon on the Majestic. The Ceiling is 31 Feet High, the Loftiest on Any Ship. The Ocean Ferry, July 1922. GGA Image ID # 20dbbe6d74

 

Two orchestras and a jazz band furnished music. At the same time, the evening guests inspected the giant vessel before sitting down. Guides were kept busy showing parties over the ship and keeping them from losing their way in her nine miles of corridors and seven and a half acres of deck space.

Dinner was served at 7 to 500 persons in the main dining saloon. Mr. Franklin presided and briefly welcomed his guests, after which he introduced Commodore Sir Bertram Hayes, the Majestic's commander, who made a few felicitous remarks.

H. G. Armstrong, British consul general at New York, spoke in a happy vein on the significance of a strong merchant marine in peace and war, and Patrick Henry Murphy, of New York, known for his wit in after-dinner speaking, excited roars of laughter with a monologue of quips on current conditions in ocean travel.

Following dinner, there was an exhibition of fancy swimming and diving given in the Pompeian bath by Miss Winnie Elliott, the Atajniie's "official mermaid," and a minstrel show in the lounge by the Clef club croup. The lounge stage comfortably accommodated the troupe of 20 men, and 360 chains were placed in the lounge without crowding for the audience.

On June 15, the Majestic was thrown open for charity, with admission tickets at 50 cents per person, the proceeds to go to New York institutions.

The Majestic sailing on her second voyage, at noon June 17, was a transportation event of the first importance. She had the greatest number of passengers in the first and second cabins combined, ever taken out of New York on one ship.

Her first cabin list numbered 800, and her second cabin was 733. She also had 642 third class. Her numbers in the first cabin have been exceeded only once in the port's history by the Imperator in 1911 when she took out 813. This, however, included many more children than in the case of the Majestic.

 

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