SS Rex Archival Collection

 

The Italian Line combined Grace and Power in the 880-foot Rex, above, built by the Ansaldo yard at Genoa.

The Italian Line combined Grace and Power in the 880-foot Rex, above, built by the Ansaldo yard at Genoa. In 1933 she won the Blue Riband from Europa, the only ship sailing from a Mediterranean port to be recognized as speed queen of the Atlantic. Ocean Liners of the 20th Century, 1963. GGA Image ID # 1d57b0219d

 

 

Rex (1932) Italia Line

Built by Societa Anónima Ansaldo, Sestri, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 51,062. Dimensions: 833' x 97' (879' o.l.). Propulsion: Quadruple-screw, 28 knots. Quadruple expansion engines. Masts and Funnels: Two masts and two funnels. Keel laid for Navigazione Generale Italiana on April 27, 1930. Ownership Change: During construction in 1932, ownership was transferred to the newly formed "Italia" Line. Maiden Voyage: Commenced her maiden voyage from Genoa to New York, September 27, 1932. Capacity: Had accommodation for 2,024 passengers, and her crew numbered 810 members. Speed Records: She was the first Italian liner to break the trans-Atlantic speed record. She made a run from Gibraltar to Ambrose Light in 4 days, 13 hours and 58 minutes, covering a distance of 3,181 nautical miles and averaging 28.92 knots. From her keel to the navigating bridge the height was 120 feet. Fate: This great liner was bombed and sunk by British aircraft, September 9, 1944, while being towed to a new hiding place. The sunken hull (near Trieste) was broken up for scrap in 1947. Indeed a pitiful sight when one remembers how majestic she appeared before the War. Running mate: Conte di Savoia.

 

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Front Cover - 21 August 1935 Passenger List, SS Rex, Italia Line

1935-08-21 SS Rex Passenger List

Steamship Line: Italia Line

Class of Passengers: Special

Date of Departure: 21 August 1935

Route: Naples to New York via Genoa, Villefranche (Nice) and Gibraltar

Commander: Captain Grand' Uff. Francesco Tarabotto

 

Front Cover of a Special Class Passenger List for the SS Rex of the Italia Line, Departing 13 September 1935 from Naples for New York.

1935-09-13 SS Rex Passenger List

Steamship Line: Italia Line

Class of Passengers: Special

Date of Departure: 13 September 1935

Route: Naples for New York via Genoa, Villefranche (Nice) and Gibraltar

Commander: Captain Francesco Tarabotto

 

Front Cover of a Tourist Class Passenger List for the SS Rex of Italia Line, Departing 13 July 1938 from Genoa to New York.

1938-07-13 SS Rex Passenger List

Steamship Line: Italia Line

Class of Passengers: Tourist

Date of Departure: 13 July 1938

Route: Genoa to New York via Cannes, Naples, and Gibraltar

Commander: Captain Attilio Frugone

 

Front Cover of a Tourist Class Passenger List for the SS Rex of the Italia Line, Departing 9 August 1938 from Naples to New York.

1938-08-09 SS Rex Passenger List

Steamship Line: Italia Line

Class of Passengers: Tourist

Date of Departure: 9 August 1938

Route: Naples to New York via Genoa, Cannes, and Gibraltar

Commander: Captain Giorgio Cavallini

 

Front Cover of a Tourist Class Passenger List for the SS Rex of the Italia Line, Departing 6 October 1939 From Genoa to New York.

1939-10-06 SS Rex Passenger List

Steamship Line: Italia Line

Class of Passengers: Tourist

Date of Departure: 6 October 1939

Route: Genoa to New York via Naples

Commander: Captain Attilio Frugone

 

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Cover of Brochure from the Italian Line on Third Class Rates from 1938.

1938-02-15 Italian Line Third Class Rates

12- Page brochure from the Italian Line provides a lot of information for passengers, third-class passage rates, and immigration laws. Third-class Interiors and ship photographs complete this very informative brochure. Featured Ships: Rex, Roma, Saturnia, Vulcania, and Conte di Savoia.

 

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Italia Contratto per Biglietto di Classe Turistica 1935 | Italy Contract for Tourist Class Ticket 1935.

SS Rex Passage Contract - 23 October 1935

Contract for Tourist Class Passage on the Italia SS Rex 1935 for a Dr. Charles Bartolomew Lombardo from Naples to New York. The contract was written with the specifications in almost micro-print on the back side.

 

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Italia Line Services for North America, South America, South Africa, Central America -- Antilles -- South Pacific, and Australia, 1935.

Italia Line Services for North America, South America, South Africa, Central America -- Antilles -- South Pacific, and Australia, 1935. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 September 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee5ba2fa7

 

Lloyd Triestino Services to the Mediterranean, and India -- The Far East, 1935.

Lloyd Triestino Services to the Mediterranean, and India -- The Far East, 1935. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 September 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee5bd9496

 

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Principal Connections of the Italia Line, Cosulich Line, and Lloyd Triestino, from Genoa to Egypt and Genoa to India, from 18 September 1935 to 29 December 1935.

Principal Connections of the Italia Line, Cosulich Line, and Lloyd Triestino, from Genoa to Egypt and Genoa to India, from 18 September 1935 to 29 December 1935. Connecting Ships Included the Esperia and Victoria. Transatlantic Ships Included the Conte di Savoia and Rex. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 September 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee5bf164f

 

Principal Connections of the Italia Line, Cosulich Line, and Lloyd Triestino, from Genoa to South Africa, Gibraltar to South Africa, and Gibraltar to New York, from 15 September 1935 to 5 December 1935.

Principal Connections of the Italia Line, Cosulich Line, and Lloyd Triestino, from Genoa to South Africa, Gibraltar to South Africa, and Gibraltar to New York, from 15 September 1935 to 5 December 1935. Connecting Ships Included the Giulio Cesare, Duilio, Rex, and Roma. Transatlantic Ships Included the Conte di Savoia and Giulio Cesare. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 September 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee5cb43d8

 

Principal Connections of the Italia Line, Cosulich Line, and Lloyd Triestino, from Naples to Egypt and Naples to India, from 17 September 1935 to 12 December 1935.

Principal Connections of the Italia Line, Cosulich Line, and Lloyd Triestino, from Naples to Egypt and Naples to India, from 17 September 1935 to 12 December 1935. Connecting Ships Included the Esperia, Victoria, and C. Rosso (via Brindisl). Transatlantic Ships Included the Conte Grande, Conte di Savoia, and Rex. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 September 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee5d21a94

 

Sailing Schedule, New York to Europe, from 24 September 1935 to 8 February 1936.

Sailing Schedule, New York to Europe, from 24 September 1935 to 8 February 1936. Ships Included the Conte di Savoia, Rex, Roma, and Vulcania. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 September 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee5b7cb0f

 

Sailing Schedule, New York to Europe, from 20 August 1938 to 4 January 1939.

Sailing Schedule, New York to Europe, from 20 August 1938 to 4 January 1939. Ships Included the Conte di Savoia, Rex, Roma, Saturnia, and Vulcania. SS Rex Passenger List, 9 August 1938. GGA Image ID # 1ee6bd0d94

 

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Italia Line Route Map, SS Rex Passenger List 21 August 1935.

Italia Line Route Map, SS Rex Passenger List 21 August 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee501a25c. Click to View Larger Image.

 

Italia Line Route Map, SS Rex Passenger List 13 September 1935.

Italia Line Route Map, SS Rex Passenger List 13 September 1935. GGA Image ID # 1ee5437aef. Click to View Larger Image.

 

Italia Line Route Map, 1938. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 July 1938.

Italia Line Route Map, 1938. SS Rex Passenger List, 13 July 1938. GGA Image ID # 1ee649d8c1. Click to View Larger Image.

 

Italia Line Route Map, 1939. SS Rex Passenger List, 6 October 1939.

Italia Line Route Map, 1939. SS Rex Passenger List, 6 October 1939. GGA Image ID # 1ee6c9de66. Click to View Larger Image.

 

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Summer Season Third Class Port Rates For Direct Sailings From New York or Boston Including Return Passage.

Summer Season Third Class Port Rates For Direct Sailings From New York or Boston Including Return Passage. Ships Included the Rex, Conte di Savoia, Roma, Saturnia, and Vulcania. Third Class Rates Brochure, 1938. GGA Image ID # 12533669a1. Click to View Larger Image.

 

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SS Rex of the Italian Line. Gross Tonnage 51,062.

SS Rex of the Italian Line. Gross Tonnage 51,062. Italian Line Third Class Rates, 1938. GGA Image ID # 125261804d

 

Third Class Dining Room on the SS Rex.

Third Class Dining Room on the SS Rex. Italian Line Third Class Rates, 1938. GGA Image ID # 1253d5fc04

 

Third Class Verandah on the SS Rex.

Third Class Verandah on the SS Rex. Italian Line Third Class Rates, 1938. GGA Image ID # 12545dd17a

 

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Passenger Autographs, Part 1 of 2. SS Rex Passenger List, 6 October 1939.

Passenger Autographs, Part 1 of 2. SS Rex Passenger List, 6 October 1939. GGA Image ID # 1ee714e8af

 

Passenger Autographs, Part 2 of 2. SS Rex Passenger List, 6 October 1939.

Passenger Autographs, Part 2 of 2. SS Rex Passenger List, 6 October 1939. GGA Image ID # 1ee7776eee

 

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Front Cover, Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic by Frank O. Braynard, © 1991.

Classic Ocean Liners, Volume 1: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic

An absorbing and detailed account of the three ships: Berengaria, Leviathan, & Majestic, 50,000-ton dinosaurs of the transatlantic lines in the years before World War I.

 

Front Cover, Doomed Ships: Great Ocean Liner Disasters by William H. Miller, Jr., 2006.

Doomed Ships: Great Ocean Liner Disasters

Naval historian William H. Miller, Jr. recounts the dramatic stories behind various ill-fated passenger ships. He takes readers beyond the newspaper headlines and formal inquiries, offering firsthand accounts of heroic rescues, daring escapes, and tragic losses.

 

Front Cover, Era of the Passenger Liner by Nicholas T. Cairis. Published by Pegasus Books Ltd., London, 1992.

Era of the Passenger Liner - 1992

The Gilded Era comes back to life as the reader relives the careers of stately ships and express greyhounds from immigrant ships to floating palaces. Scarce, large format book containing 288pp. Features photographs, statistics, and background of 280 passenger liners, each with a picture.

 

Front Cover, The Fabulous Interiors of the Great Ocean Liners, 1984.

The Fabulous Interiors of the Great Ocean Liners - 1984

Some 200 superb photographs—in long shots and close-ups—capture exquisite interiors of world's great "floating palaces"—1890s to 1980s: Titanic, Île de France, Queen Elizabeth, United States, Europa, more. Informative captions provide key details.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Famous Ocean Liners: The Story of Passenger Shipping from the Turn of the Century to the Present Day by William H. Miller, 1987.

Famous Ocean Liners - 1987

Here is the story of twentieth-century passenger shipping, from the first of the superliners — the German Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse — to Cunard's Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary, right up to Queen Elizabeth 2.

 

Front Cover, The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4, by Melvin Maddocks, 1978.

The Great Liners: The Seafarers, Volume 4

A history of the world's famous luxury liners provides portraits of the ships. It examines such great disasters as the sinking of the Titanic. This edition explores the grand hotels that traversed the Atlantic between 1840 and 1930.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Great Passenger Ships of the World, Volume 3: 1924-1935 by Arnold Kludas, 1976.

Great Passenger Ships of the World 1924-1935

Volume 3 in the series covers the years 1924-1935 and includes the introduction of the well-known superliners Normandie and Queen Mary, both of which successfully competed for the prestigious Blue Riband award for the fastest transatlantic crossing.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Majesty at Sea: The Four-Stackers by John J. Shaum, Jr. and William H. Flayhart III, 1981.

Majesty at Sea: The Four Stackers

The opulent and luxurious four-funnel passenger liners, of which only fourteen have ever been built, are unsurpassed in maritime history. Built between 1897 and 1921, these great vessels vied with each other in their standards of comfort, spaciousness, and speed, and great was the rivalry between their owners.

 

Front Cover, Merchant Fleets # 40: Italia 1881-2001 by Duncan Haws, 2001.

Italia 1881-2001 - Merchant Fleets # 40

Duncan Haws featured 494 ships and their history, with 149 profiles covering over 450 vessels. This book was the final volume in the Merchant Fleets series. It illustrated the convoluted history of the Italian Line.

 

Front Cover, Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970 by John Adams, 1993.

Ocean Steamers: A History of Ocean-Going Passenger Steamships 1820-1970

A history of the steam-powered passenger ship that details its story from the SS Savannah of 1819 to the SS Hamburg of 1969. It contains historical details of all civilian vessels built in the intervening years, with numerous illustrations and previously unpublished material.

 

Front Cover, Passenger Liners Of The World Since 1893 By Nicholas T. Cairis, Revised Edition With Over 200 pictures, 1979.

Passenger Liners of the World Since 1893

The author here takes a nostalgic look back to the heyday of the passenger ship, providing a brief history of 211 ships of over 10,000 tons, together with specifications and technical details of each.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Passenger Ships of the World, Past and Present by Eugene W. Smith, 1963.

Passenger Ships of the World - 1963

Passenger Ships of the World, 1963, represents an incredible resource covering passenger ships that are Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Pacific, Trans-Pacific via Panama Canal, Latin American, Africa and the Eastern Oceans, and California-Hawaii.

 

Front Cover, Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994 by William H Miller, Jr., 417 Photographs, 1995.

Pictorial Encyclopedia of Ocean Liners, 1860-1994

One of the most comprehensive pictorial references on ocean liners ever published, this superb chronicle by noted maritime historian William H. Miller, Jr., depicts and describes virtually every passenger ship of over 15,000 tons built between 1860 and the late 1900s.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships by William H. Miller, Jr., 2002.

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships

Picture History of German and Dutch Passenger Ships is a superbly illustrated volume that documents a long line of great ships--from "floating palaces" such as the Imperator (1913) and the Vaterland (1914) to such luxurious cruise ships as the Statendam (1957), Hamburg (1969), the remodeled Bremen (1990), and the new Deutschland (1998).

 

Front Cover, Picture History of the Andrea Doria by William H. Miller, Jr., 2005.

Picture History of the Andrea Doria

Graceful, fast, and luxuriously outfitted, the Andrea Doria was one of the most famous ships of the 20th century. On July 26, 1956, three years after its inaugural voyage, the famous Italian liner was assured of an immortal place in maritime history after colliding with another vessel off the New England coast and sinking.

 

Front Cover, Picture History of the Cunard Line 1840 - 1990 by Frank O. Braynard and William H. Miller, Jr., 1990.

Picture History of the Cunard Line 1840 - 1990

The Picture History of the Cunard Line 1840 - 1990 has over 180 photographs and illustrations showing the liners on the high seas and in port and depicting handsome staterooms, lounges, interior decor, and carefree life aboard ship.

 

Front Cover and Spine Plus, The Atlantic Liners 1925-70 by Frederick Earl Emmons, 1972.

The Atlantic Liners 1925-1970

THE ATLANTIC LINERS will be cherished by all the millions of Americans who love the sea. Frederick Emmons sketches the histories of every ocean liner that sailed between the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1970.

 

Front Cover, The Only Way to Cross: The Golden Era of the Great Atlantic Express Liners -- from the Mauretania to the France and the Queen Elizabeth 2 by John Maxtone-Graham with a Forward by Walter Lord, 1972.

The Only Way to Cross: The Golden Era of the Great Atlantic Express Liners

The book profiles the opulent lifestyles aboard such floating palaces as Normandie, Rex, Olympic, Amerika, Queen Mary, France, Mauritania, Queen Elizabeth II, Imperator, and Titanic.

 

Front Cover and Spine, Tourist Third Cabin: Steamship Travel in the Interwar Years by Lorraine Coons and Alexander Varias, 2003.

Tourist Third Cabin: Steamship Travel in the Interwar Years

Ocean Liners and New Vistas of Interwar Society From Immigrants to Tourists. The Changing Complexion of Translatlantic Passengers as The Soul of a Ship. Experience and Life of Below-Deck Personnel Traveling Palace or Floating Sweatshop. The Experience of Women Seafarers Projecting an Image: The Allure of Transatlantic Travel.

 

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General Information for Passengers - 21 August 1935

 

Berthing of Passengers - No alteration in Ca. bin can be made except through the Purser. Receipt for any difference paid, as per the Company's fixed Tariff, will be given to Passengers by the Purser, who will also duly note on passage tickets changes of accommodation.

Medical Attendance - For medical and surgical attendance to Passengers, ship's surgeons are entitled to professional fees, to be charged as per published schedule, available at Purser's Offices.

Said medical and surgical attendance will be free of charge, if Passengers are suffering from seasickness, or are affected by infirmities or injuries deriving from statical conditions of the ship or in any way pertaining to navigation, and also in cases of contagious diseases which are subject to denunciation.

Return accommodation - For the convenience of those Passengers who may be returning from the United States to Europe and have not yet made the necessary arrangements, the Enquiry & Travel Office will be pleased to radio the New York Office for any accommodation required. This will enable Passengers to complete their arrangements before leaving the steamer and will consequently save them time and trouble.

Wireless Services — The vessels belonging to the Societa Italia are equipped with a most powerful and up-to-date radiotelegraphic plant. In this way the ships remain in communication with any part of the world by the medium of the chain of wireless stations on terra-firma.

All through the voyage, this vessel is in continuous touch with Italy, Europe, and the United States of America. Thus, the Marconigrams are transmitted, or received, direct; so that a quick service and a rapid exchange of business, or private, messages can be effected at any moment.

The Radiotelegraphic Station will be found on Sport Deck.

For the greater convenience of Passengers no Marconigrams arriving during the night will be delivered to Addressee before 7,30 a. m., unless the Passenger has expressly requested the Enquiry & Travel Office to hand him same at once on receipt during the night.

Mail Service - Three different types of messages can be sent from on board:

a) Marconigrams

b) Ocean radioletters (SLT) (reduced rates)

c) Marconigram - letters (OL)

Marconigrams - Messages of an urgent nature should be sent as "Marconigrams " and same are telegraphed right through.

A marconigram to Italy or to North America sent this way from steamer cost less than a cable sent from on shore at the ports of call.

Ocean Padioletters (SLT) - Are accepted at reduced rates for the United States and Canada. The service is of the deferred type. Ocean Radioletters are sent by radio from steamer to one of the shore stations of North America who forward them to destination by air or ordinary mail.

Rate Italian lire 28.— for 24 words, plus Italian lire 1.11 for each extra word.

Marconigram - letters (OL) - Are only accepted for Italy. The service is of the deferred type. Such messages are sent by wireless to any vessel proceeding to Italy and the receiving vessel arranges for the forwarding to destination by ordinary mail at first port of call in Italy.

Rate Italian lire 10.60 for 20 words, and Italian lire 1.00 for each extra word.

Service On Land — News can be sent to Passengers by their relations or friends, if these are residing in Italy, by means of Marconigrams transmitted to the vessel via "Coltanoradio".

Relations or friends resident in other European countries will find it advisable to forward their Marconi-grams, intended for the ship, by the medium of the aforesaid "Coltanoradio " Station, the vessel being in continuous communication with same.

Marconigrams can be presented at any Telegraphic Office, using the following Form of Address:

Passenger's Name

Vessel's Name

"Coltanoradio

This is to he followed by the text.

Wireless Telephony Station — The vessel is also equipped with the most perfect and up-to-date radiotelephonic plant (ultra powerful "Marconi") for transmitting and receiving, therefore secures a regular service during the navigation, both with Europe, the U. S. A., Canada, Mexico and Cuba.

The normal range of this set of apparatus allows of direct communications from ship to North America, immediately after leaving Italy. As soon as the vessel has left America, Passengers can communicate with all the principal European Towns.

Suggestion and Complaints — Passengers are requested to ask for the Special Book, and insert in same any suggestions or complaints they may wish to make with regard to inconveniences noted by them in the Ship's Radiotelegraphic Service.

For full details and tariffs please apply direct to the Wireless Station on board.

Mail — Mail received after Passengers have left the ship is forwarded to the address furnished by them on the Identification Cards.

High Seas Mail — The Enquiry and Travel Office is acting also as oficial Agent of the Italian Post Administration; therefore accepts registered mail.

Banking Services - Passengers may avail themselves of the banking services (exchange of money, letters of credit, travelers cheques, banking enquiries, etc.) at the Bank located in the Entrance Hall, the care of which in entrusted to an Official of the Banca Commerciale Italiana.

A special booklet containing details of this service will be distributed to Passengers upon their request.

Valuables - The Company is not responsible for loss or theft of valuables, money, etc. Same should be handed to the Purser for deposit in his safe. In such cases valuables should be consigned under seal with the name of the depositor clearly shown.

No charge is made for such service and the Company accepts no liability in connection therewith.

Safe deposit boxes for the safe keeping of valuables can be secured free of charge upon application to the Enquiry and Travel Office. A deposit of 50 itAlian Liras in only requested and refunded to the Passengers when returning to boxes key.

The deposit of valuables in the safe boxes is made by the Passengers themselves without any inventory or control of the Line, it being expressly agreed that the Line does not accept any responsibility for the safe custody of the valuables.

Baggage Insurance — As the Company's liability for baggage is strictly limited, it is strongly recommended to Passengers to insure their baggage as, in the event of loss or damage to the same, the Company cannot under any circumstances, accept liability beyond the amount specified on the steamer contract ticket. - Baggage can be insured at the Enquiry & Travel Office, such insurance covering all risks on land or sea.

SPORTS - Swimming Pool — The Company accepts no responsability whatsoever for any accident from whatever cause arising to any Passenger using the Swimming Pool, Gymnasium and other kinds of Sports.

Passengers Are Not Allowed To Trespass the limit of their own class.

Steamer Chairs, Rugs and Cushions - For the westbound trip, the charge for chairs is Lire 20, for rugs Lire 20 and for cushions Lire 7.

Lifebelts — A special board containing Instructions for the Use of Lifebelts is posted in every Stateroom. Passengers are requested to take notice of the above mentioned Instructions as indicated.

Professional Gamblers — Passengers are informed that professional gamblers seeking to play for high stakes, are reported as crossing on Atlantic steamers.

Cinema - Films — Passengers are strictly forbidden to keep cinema-films in their cabins. Such must be delivered to the Enquiry and Travel Office in order to be stored in a suitable room during the voyage.

Collections, charitable or otherwise are strictly forbidden.

For further information, please consult the "Ship's routine ".

Useful Information for The Arrival at New York

Hotel Reservations in New York By Wireless-Telegram - Passengers may send, free of charge, wireless telegrams in code reserving accommodation at New York Hotels. Full particulars may be obtained at the Enquiry & Travel Office.

Arrival at New York - Passengers are landed at the Pier 59 North River, where Passengers will find taxis, telephones etc. If the vessel arrives at the Pier after 8 p. m., Passengers have the option of remaining on board over night and landing after breakfast the following morning.

Parlor and Sleeping Car Reservations for pullman and ordinary trains throughout U. S. may be made through the Enquiry and Travel Office. In making any of the above reservations Passengers are kindly requested to do so at least two days before the day of arrival of the ship in New York.

Landing Cards, Port of New York — Before leaving the vessel, holders must present landing cards to the U. S. Doctor and to U. S. Immigration Inspector for endorsement.

American citizen must present Landings Cards only to the U. S. Immigrants Inspector for the visa.

Delivery of Baggage in New York — Passengers are especially requested to claim their baggage before leaving the Custom's Baggage Room on the Pier, as, otherwise, considerable delay and extra charge for carriage will be incurred in forwarding to destination any baggage not accompanying Passengers on the railway.

Forwarding of Passengers - For the convenience of all Passengers disembarking at our piers in New York who are destined to interior points, the Railroad Lines out of New York, as well as Steamship Lines for Boston have representatives on the wharf to meet Passengers and arrange to issue railroad tickets to all points in the United States, Canada and Mexico, as well as tickets to Boston, via steamer. These representatives will also arrange to check baggage from ours pier through to destination, relieving Passengers of the annoyance of purchasing their tickets at the depot or of re-checking their baggage. Transfer charges from our piers to rail depots or steamship dock must be paid by Passengers.

Recovery of U. S. Head Tax - This tax can be recovered by Passengers, if same has been paid, provided they inform the U. S. Immigration Inspector on arrival at New York of their intention to leave the U. S. within sixty days (the time prescribed by U. S. Law) and obtain from him Transit Certificate Form 514.

It is also necessary for Transit Certificate Form 514 to be handed to the Transportation Company, when complete, in time to allow same to be placed before the Immigration Authorities in Washington within 120 days of Passenger's arrival in the United States.

Unless this regulation is complied with, the Tax cannot be recovered.

Claims and Complaints — Passengers' criticism and suggestions relative to the services on board receive the most particular attention of the Company. Passengers are requested to address themselves in this connection either to the Captain or to the Direction, at the "Italia " Company's Headquarters, Piazza De-Ferrari, Genoa.

Source: SS Rex Passenger List - 21 August 1935

 

General Information for Passengers - 13 September 1935

 

Berthing of Passengers - No alteration in Ca. bin can be made except through the Purser. Receipt for any difference paid, as per the Company's fixed Tariff, will be given to Passengers by the Purser, who will also duly note on passage tickets changes of accommodation.

Medical Attendance - For medical and surgical attendance to Passengers, ship' s surgeons are entitled to professional fees, to be charged as per published schedule, available at Purser's Offices.

Said medical and surgical attendance will be free of charge, if Passengers are suffering from seasickness, or are affected by infirmities or injuries deriving from statical conditions of the ship or in any way pertaining to navigation, and also in cases of contagious diseases which are subject to denunciation.

Return accommodation - For the convenience of those Passengers who may be returning from the United States to Europe and have not yet made the necessary arrangements, the Enquiry & Travel Office will be pleased to radio the New Y&rk Office for any accommodation required. This will enable Passengers to complete their arrangements before leaving the steamer and will consequently save them time and trouble.

Wireless Services — The vessels belonging to the Societa Italia are equipped with a most powerful and up-to-date radiotelegraphic plant. In this way the ships remain in communication with any part of the world by the medium of the chain of wireless stations on terra-firma.

All through the voyage, this vessel is in continuous touch with Italy, Europe, and the United States of America. Thus, the Marconigrams are transmitted, or received, direct; so that a quick service and a rapid exchange of business, or private, messages can be effected at any moment.

The Radiotelegraphic Station will be found on Sport Deck.

For the greater convenience of Passengers no Marconigrams arriving during the night will be delivered to Addressee before 7,30 a. m., unless the Passenger has expressly requested the Enquiry & Travel Office to hand him same at once on receipt during the night.

Mail Service - Three different types of messages can be sent from on board:

a) Marconigrams

b) Ocean radioletters (SLT) (reduced rates)

c) Marconigram - letters (OL)

Marconigrams Messages of an urgent nature should be sent as "Marconigrams " and same are telegraphed right through.

A marconigram to Italy or to North America sent this way from steamer cost less than a cable sent from on shore at the ports of call.

Ocean Radioletters (SLT) - Are accepted at reduced rates for the United States and Canada. The service is of the deferred type. Ocean Radioletters are sent by radio from steamer to one of the shore stations of North America who forward them to destination by air or ordinary mail.

Rate Italian lire 28.— for 24 words, plus Italian lire 1.11 for each extra word.

Marconigram - letters (OL) - Are only accepted for Italy. The service is of the deferred type. Such messages are sent by wireless to any vessel proceeding to Italy and the receiving vessel arranges for the forwarding to destination by ordinary mail at first port of call in Italy.

Rate Italian lire 10.60 for 20 words, and Italian lire 1.00 for each extra word.

Service On Land — News can be sent to Passengers by their relations or friends, if these are residing in Italy, by means of Marconigrams transmitted to the vessel via "Coltanoradio".

Relations or friends resident in other European countries will find it advisable to forward their Marconi-grams, intended for the ship, by the medium of the aforesaid " Coltanoradio " Station, the vessel being in continuous communication with same.

Marconigrams can be presented at any Telegraphic Office, using the following Form of Address:

Passenger's Name

Vessel's Name

"Coltanoradio.'

This is to be followed by the text.

Wireless Telephony Station — The vessel is also equipped with the most perfect and up-to-date radiotelephonic plant (ultra powerful "Marconi") for transmitting and receiving, therefore secures a regular service during the navigation, both with Europe, the U. S. A., Canada, Mexico and Cuba.

The normal range of this set of apparatus allows of direct communications from ship to North America, immediately after leaving Italy. As soon as the vessel has left America, Passengers can communicate with all the principal European Towns.

Suggestion and Complaints — Passengers are requested to ask for the Special Book, and insert in same any suggestions or complaints they may wish to make with regard to inconveniences noted by them in the Ship's Radiotelegraphic Service.

For full details and tariffs please apply direct to the Wireless Station on board.

Mail — Mail received after Passengers have left the ship is forwarded to the address furnished by them on the Identification Cards.

High Seas Mail — The Enquiry and Travel Office is acting also as oficial Agent of the Italian Post Administration; therefore accepts registered mail.

Banking Services - Passengers may avail themselves of the banking services (exchange of money, letters of credit, travelers cheques, banking enquiries, etc.) at the Bank located in the Entrance Hall, the care of which in entrusted to an Official of the Banca Commerciale Italiana.
A special booklet containing details of this service will be distributed to Passengers upon their request.

Valuables - The Company is not responsible for loss or theft of valuables, money, etc. Same should be handed to the Purser for deposit in his safe. In such cases valuables should be consigned under seal with the name of the depositor clearly shown.

No charge is made for such service and the Company accepts no liability in connection therewith.

Safe deposit boxes for the safe keeping of valuables can be secured free of charge upon application to the Enquiry and Travel Office. A deposit of 50 italian Liras in only requested and refunded to the Passengers when returning to boxes key.

The deposit of valuables in the safe boxes is made by the Passengers themselves without any inventory or control of the Line, it being expressly agreed that the Line does not accept any responsibility for the safe custody of the valuables.

Baggage Insurance — As the Company's liability for baggage is strictly limited, it is strongly recommended to Passengers to insure their baggage as, in the event of loss or damage to the same, the Company cannot under any circumstances, accept liability beyond the amount specified on the steamer contract ticket. - Baggage can be insured at the Enquiry & Travel Office, such insurance covering all risks on land or sea.

SPORTS - Swimming Pool — The Company accepts no responsability whatsoever for any accident from whatever cause arising to any Passenger using the Swimming Pool, Gymnasium and other kinds of Sports.

Passengers Are Not Allowed To Trespass the limit of their own class.

Steamer Chairs, Rugs and Cushions - For the westbound trip, the charge for chairs is Lire 20, for rugs Lire 20 and for cushions Lire 7.

Lifebelts — A special board containing Instructions for the Use of Lifebelts is posted in every Stateroom. Passengers are requested to take notice of the above mentioned Instructions as indicated.

Professional Gamblers — Passengers are informed that professional gamblers seeking to play for high stakes, are reported as crossing on Atlantic steamers.

Cinema - Films — Passengers are strictly forbidden to keep cinema-films in their cabins. Such must be delivered to the Enquiry and Travel Office in order to be stored in a suitable room during the voyage.

Collections, charitable or otherwise are strictly forbidden.

For further information, please consult the "Ship's routine".

Useful Information for The Arrival at New York

Hotel Reservations in New York By Wireless -Telegram - Passengers may send, free of charge, wireless telegrams in code reserving accommodation at New York Hotels. Full particulars may be obtained at the Enquiry & Travel Office.

Arrival at New York - Passengers are landed at the Pier 59 North River, where Passengers will find taxis, telephones etc. If the vessel arrives at the Pier after 8 p. m., Passengers have the option of remaining on board over night and landing after breakfast the following morning.

Parlor and Sleeping Car Reservations for pullman and ordinary trains throughout U. S. may be made through the Enquiry and Travel Office. In making any of the above reservations Passengers are kindly requested to do so at least two days before the day of arrival of the ship in New York.

Landing Cards, Port of New York — Before leaving the vessel, holders must present landing cards to the U. S. Doctor and to U. S. Immigration Inspector for endorsement.
American citizen must present Landings Cards only to the U. S. Immigrants Inspector for the visa.

Delivery of Baggage in New York — Passengers are especially requested to claim their baggage before leaving the Custom's Baggage Room on the Pier, as, otherwise, considerable delay and extra. -...harge for carriage will be incurred in forwarding to destination any baggage not accompanying Passengers on the railway.

Forwarding of Passengers - For the convenience of all Passengers disembarking at our piers in New. York who are destined to interior points, the Railroad Lines out of New York, as well as Steamship Lines for Boston have representatives on the wharf to meet Passengers and arrange to issue railroad tickets to all points in the United States, Canada and Mexico, as well as tickets to Boston, via steamer. These representatives will also arrange to check baggage from ours pier through to destination, relieving Passengers of the annoyance of purchasing their tickets at the depot or of re-checking their baggage. Transfer charges from our piers to rail depots or steamship dock must be paid by Passengers.

Recovery of U. S. Head Tax - This tax can be recovered by Passengers, if same has been paid, provided they inform the U. S. Immigration Inspector on arrival at New York of their intention to leave the U. S. within sixty days (the time prescribed by U. S. Law) and obtain from him Transit Certificate Form 514.

It is also necessary for Transit Certificate Form 514 to be handed to the Transportation Company, when complete, in time to allow same to be placed before the Immigration Authorities in Washington within 120 days of Passenger's arrival in the United States.

Unless this regulation is complied with, the Tax cannot be recovered:

Claims and Complaints — Passengers' criticism and suggestions relative to the services on board receive the most particular attention of the Company. Passengers are requested to address themselves in this connection either to the Captain or to the Direction, at the " Italia " Company's Headquarters, Piazza De-Ferrari, Genoa.

Source: SS Rex Passenger List - 13 September 1935

 

General Information for Passengers - 13 July 1938

 

Berthing of Passengers - No alteration in Cabin can be made except through the Purser. Receipt for any difference paid, as per the Company's fixed Tariff, will be given to Passengers by the Purser, who will also duly note on passage tickets changes of accommodation.

Medical Attendance - For medical and surgical attendance to Passengers, ship' s surgeons are entitled to professional fees, to be charged as per published schedule, available at Purser's Offices.

Said medical and surgical attendance will be free of charge, if Passengers are suffering from seasickness, or are affected by infirmities or injuries deriving from statical conditions of the ship or in any way pertaining to navigation, and also in cases of contagious diseases which are subject to denunciation.

Return accommodation - For the convenience of those Passengers who may be returning from the United States to Europe and have not yet made the necessary arrangements, the Enquiry & Travel Office will be pleased to radio the New York Office for any accommodation required. This will enable Passengers to complete their arrangements before leaving the steamer and will consequently save them time and trouble.

Suggestion and Complaints — Passengers are requested to ask for the Special Book, and insert in same any suggestions or complaints they may wish to make with regard to inconveniences noted by them in the Ship's Radiotelegraphic Service.

For full details and tariffs please apply direct to the Wireless Station on board.

Telephone Service on Board The Vessels at Genoa and Naples. — During the days of arrival &/or sailing of the vessels from the port of Genoa, as well as during the vessels' stay at Naples, both on outward and homeward voyages from New York, a telephone service (interurban) at tariff rates is made expressly available on board this vessel for Passengers' requirements.

A person appointed by the Telephone Company is on board at Passengers' disposal during the time established for the service in question.

Mail — Mail received after Passengers have left the ship is Forwarded to the address furnished by them on fhe Identification Cards.

High Seas Mail — The Enquiry and Travel Office is acting also as oficial Agent of the Italian Post Administration; therefore accepts registered mail.

Banking Services - Passengers may avail themselves of the banking services (exchange of money, letters of credit, travelers cheques, banking enquiries, etc.) at the Bank located in the Entrance Hall, the care of which in entrusted to an Official of the Ban ca Commerciale Italiana.

A special booklet containing details of this service will be distributed to Passengers upon their request.

Important Notice.—Anyone entering or leaving Italy in allowed to carry a maximum amount in italian cash money of 350 Lire

Exporting and importing of 500!and 1000 Lira Banknotes is prohibited.

Any amount found not in accordance with these provisions is sequestered by Italian Custom Authorities.

Valuables - The Company is not responsible for loss or thPft of valuables, money, etc. Same should be handed to the Purser for deposit in his safe. In such cases valuables should be consigned under seal with the name of the depositor clearly shown.

No charge is made for such service and the Company accepts no liability in connection therewith.

Baggage Insurance — As the Company's liability for baggage is strictly limited, it is strongly recommended to Passengers to insure their baggage as, in the event of loss or damage to the same, the Company cannot under any circumstances, accept liability beyond the amount specified on the steamer contract ticket. - Baggage can be insured at the Enquiry & Travel Office, such insurance covering all risks on land or sea.

Passengers Are Not Allowed To Trespass the limit of their own class.

Steamer Chairs, Rugs and Cushions — For the westbound trip, the charge for chairs is 0,80, for rugs 0,80 and for cushions 0,40.

Lifebelts — A special board containing Instructions for the Use of Lifebelts is posted in every Stateroom. Passengers are requested to take notice of the above mentioned Instructions as indicated.

Professional Gamblers — Passengers are informed that professional gamblers seeking to play for high stakes, are reported as crossing on Atlantic steamers.

Cinema- Films — Passengers are strictly forbidden to keep cinema-films in their cabins. Such must be delivered to the Enquiry and Travel Office in order to be stored in a suitable room during the voyage.

Collections, charitable or otherwise are strictly forbidden.

For further information, please consult the "Ships' routine".

Useful Information for The Arrival at New York

Hotel Reservations in New York By Wireless-Telegram — Passengers may send, free of charge, wireless telegrams in code reserving accommodation at New York I lotels. Full particulars may be obtained at the Enquiry & Travel Office.

Arrival at New York — Passengers are landed at the Pier 92 North River, where Passengers will find taxis, telephones etc. If the vessel arrives at the Pier after 8 p. m., Passengers have the option of remaining on board over night and landing after breakfast the following morning.

Landing Cards, Port of New York — Before leaving the vessel, holders must present landing cards to the U. S. Doctor and to U. S. Immigration Inspector for endorsement.

American citizen must present Landings Cards only to the U. S. Immigrants Inspector for the visa.

Delivery of Baggage in New York — Passengers are especially requested to claim their baggage before leaving the Custom' s Baggage Room on the Pier, as, otherwise, considerable delay and extra charge for carriage will be incurred in forwarding to destination any baggage not accompanying Passengers on the railway.

Forwarding of Passengers — For the convenience of all Passengers disembarking at our piers in New York who are destined to interior points, the Railroad Lines out of New York, as well as Steamship Lines for Boston have representatives on the wharf to meet Passengers and arrange to issue railroad tickets to all points in the United States, Canada and Mexico, as well as tickets to Boston, via steamer. These representatives will also arrange to check baggage from ours pier through to destination, relieving Passengers of the annoyance of purchasing their tickets at-the depot or of re-checking their Baggage. Transfer charges from our piers to rail depots or steamship dock must be paid by Passengers.

Recovery of U. S. Head Tax - This tax can be recovered by Passengers, if same has been paid, provided they inform the U. S. Immigration Inspector on arrival at New York of their intention to leave the U. S. within sixty days (the time prescribed by U. S. Law) and obtain from him Transit Certificate Form 614.

It is also necessary for Transit Certificate Form 514 to be handed to the Transportation Company, when complete, in time to allow same to be placed before the Immigration Authorities in Washington within 120 days of Passenger's arrival in the United States. Unless this regulation is complied with, the Tax cannot be recovered.

Claims and Complaints - Passengers' criticism and suggestions relative to the services on board receive the most particular attention of the Company. Passengers are requested to address themselves in this connection either to the Captain or to the Direction, at the "Italia" Company's Headquarters, Piazza De-Ferrari, Genoa.

Source: SS Rex Passenger List - 13 July 1938

 

General Information for Passengers - 6 October 1939

 

Berthing of Passengers - No alteration in Cabin can be made except through the Purser. Receipt for any difference paid, as per the Company's fixed Tariff, will be given to Passengers by the Purser, who will also duly note on passage tickets changes of accommodation.

Medical Attendance - For medical and surgical attendance to Passengers, ship' s surgeons are entitled to professional fees, to be charged as per published schedule, available at Purser's Offices.

Said medical and surgical attendance will be free of charge, if Passengers are suffering from seasickness, or are affected by infirmities or injuries deriving from statical conditions of the ship or in any way pertaining to navigation, and also in cases of contagious diseases which are subject to denunciation.

Return accommodation - For the convenience of those Passengers who may be returning from the United States to Europe and have not yet made the necessary arrangements, the Enquiry & Travel Office will be pleased to radio the New Itcrk Office for any accommodation required. This will enable Passengers to complete their arrangements before leaving the steamer and will consequently save them time and trouble.

Wireless Services — The vessels belonging to the Societa Italia are equipped with a most powerful and up-to-date radiotelegraphic plant. In this way the ships remain in communication with any part of the world by the medium of the chain of wireless stations on terra-firma.

All through the voyage, this vessel is in continuous touch with Italy, Europe, and the United States of America. Thus, the Marconigrams are transmitted, or received, direct; so that a quick service and a rapid exchange of business, or private, messages can be effected at any moment.

The Radiotelegraphic Station will be found on Sport Deck.

For the greater convenience of Passengers no Marconigrams arriving during the night will be delivered to Addressee before 7,30 a. m., unless the Passenger has expressly requested the Enquiry & Travel Office to hand him same at once on receipt during the night.

Mail Service - Four different types of messages can be sent from on board:

a) Marconigrams

b) Night Marconigrams (NRT) (reduced rates)

c) Ocean radioletters (SLT)

d) Marconigram - letters (OL)

a) Marconigrams - Messages of an urgent nature should be sent as " Marconigrams " and same are telegraphed right through.

A marconigram to Italy or to North America sent this way from steamer cost less than a cable sent from on shore at the ports of call.

b) Night radiotelegrams for United States. - A service of Night Radiolelegrams (NRT) to the United States has been recently established for Passengers convenience.

These messages are accepted at the Radio Office not later than midnight (ship's time) and delivered to destination next morning.

Messages are admitted in plain language only, but telegraphic address may be used.
The word (NRT) to precede the address, and it is charged for.

Tariff
Per word . . . . Lit. 3,57 (equal to about I) 0,19)

c) Ocean Radioletters (SLT) - Are accepted at reduced rates for Italy, the United States and other countries at special rates. The service is of the deferred type. Registered addresses are not admitted such adchtsses to be written in plain language. Ocean Radio-letters are sent by radio from steamer to one of the shore stations of the country of destination who forward them to destination by air or ordinary mail.

Rate for the U. S. of America: Italian Lire 37,75 for 19 words, plus Italian Lire 1,91 for each additional word.

For Italy: Italian Lire 34,50 for 19 words, plus Italian Lire 1,75 for each additional word.

d) Marconigram - letters (OL) - Are only accepted for Italy. The service is of the deferred type. Such messages are sent by wireless to any Italian vessel proceeding to Italy and the receiving vessel arranges for the forwarding to destination by ordinary mail at first port of call in Italy.

Rate Italian lire 10.60 for 20 words, and Italian lire 1.00 for each extra word.

Service On Land — News can be sent to Passengers by their relations or friends, if these are residing in Italy, by means of Marconigrams transmitted to the vessel via "Coltanoradio ".

Relations or friends resident in other European countries will find it advisable to forward their Marconi-grams, intended for the ship, by the medium of the aforesaid " Coltanoradio " Station, the vessel being in continuous communication with same.

Marconigrams can be presented at any Telegraphic Office, using the following Form of Address:

Passenger's Name

Vessel's Name

"Coltanoradio"

This is to be followed by the text.

Wireless Telephony Station — The vessel is also equipped with the most perfect and up-to-date radiotelephonic plant (ultra powerful "Marconi") for transmitting and receiving, therefore secures a regular service during the navigation, both with Europe, the U. S. A., Canada, Mexico and Cuba.

The normal range of this set of apparatus allows of direct communications trom ship to North America, immediately after leaving Italy. As soon as the vessel has left America, Passengers can communicate with all the principal European Towns.

Suggestion and Complaints — Passengers are requested to ask for the Special Book, and insert in same any suggestions or complaints they may wish to make with regard to inconveniences noted by them in the Ship's Radiotelegraphic Service.

For full details and tariffs please apply direct to the Wireless Station on board.

Telephone Service on Board the Vessels at Genoa and Naples. — During the days of arrival &/or sailing of the vessels from the port of Genoa. as well as during the vessels' stay at Naples, both on outward and homeward voyages from New York, a telephone service (interurban) at tariff rates is made expressly available on board this vessel for Passengers' requirements.

A person appointed by the Telephone Company is on board at Passengers' disposal during the time established for the service in question.

Mail — Mail received after Passengers have left the ship is forwarded to the address furnished by them on the Identification Cards.

High Seas Mail — The Enquiry and Travel Office is acting also as oficial Agent of the Italian Post Administration; therefore accepts registered mail.

Banking Services - Passengers may avail themselves of the banking services (exchange of money, letters of credit, travelers cheques, banking enquiries, etc.) at the Bank located in the &trance Hall, the care of which in entrusted to an Official of the Banca Commerciale Italiana. A special booklet containing details of this service will be distributed to Passengers upon their request.

Important Notice. — Anyone entering or leaving Italy in allowed to carry a maximum amount in italian cash money of 350 Lire

Exporting and importing of 500 and 1000 Lira Banknotes is prohibited.

Any amount found not in accordance with these provisions is sequestered by Italian Custom Authorities.

Valuables - The Company is not responsible for loss or thqt of valuables, money, etc. Same should be handed to the Purser for deposit in his safe. In such cases valuables should be consigned under seal with the name of the depositor clearly shown.

No charge is made for such service and the Company accepts no liability in connection therewith.

Baggage Insurance — As the Company's liability for baggage is strictly limited, it is strongly recommended to Passengers to insure their baggage as, in the event of loss or damage to the same, the Company cannot under any circumstances, accept liability beyond the amount specified on the steamer contract ticket. - Baggage can be insured at the Enquiry & Travel Office, such insurance covering all risks on land or sea.

Passengers Are Not Allowed To Trespass the limit of their own class.

Lifebelts — A special board containing Instructions for the Use of Lifebelts is posted in every Stateroom. Passengers are requested to take notice of the above mentioned Instructions as indicated.

Professional Gamblers — Passengers are informed that professional gamblers seeking to play for high stakes, are reported as crossing on Atlantic steamers.

Cinema-Films — Passengers are strictly forbidden to keep cinema-films in their cabins. Such must be delivered to the Enquiry and Travel Office in order to be stored in a suitable room during the voyage.

Collections, charitable or otherwise are strictly forbidden.

For further information, please consult the "Ship's routine".

Useful Information for The Arrival at New York

Hotel Reservations in New York By Wireless-Telegram — Passengers may send, free of charge, wireless telegrams in code reserving accommodation at New York Hotels. Full particulars may be obtained at the Enquiry & Travel Office.

Arrival at New York — Passengers are landed at the Pier 92 North River, where Passengers will find taxis, telephones etc. If the vessel arrives at the Pier after 8 p. rn., Passengers have the option of remaining on board over night and landing after breakfast the following morning.

Landing Cards, Port of New York — Before leaving the vessel, holders must present landing cards to the U. S. Doctor and to U. S. Immigration Inspector for endorsement. American citizen must present Landings Cards only to the U. S. Immigrants Inspector for the visa.

Delivery of Baggage in New York — Passengers are especially requested to claim their baggage before leaving the Custom' s Baggage Room on the Pier, as, otherwise, considerable delay and extra charge for carriage will be incurred in forwarding to destination any baggage not accompanying Passengers on the railway.

Forwarding of Passengers — For the convenience of all Passengers disembarking at our piers in New York who are destined to interior points, the Railroad Lines out of New York, as well as Steamship Lines for Boston have representatives on the wharf to me 10 Passengers and arrange to issue railroad tickets to all points in the United States, Canada and Mexico, as well as tickets to Boston, via steamer. These representatives will also arrange to check baggage from ours pier through to destination, relieving Passengers of the annoyance of purchasing their tickets at-the depot or of re-checking their Baggage. Transfer charges from our piers to rail depots or steamship dock must be paid by Passengers.

Recovery of U. S. Head Tax - This tax can be recovered by Passengers, if same has been paid, provided they inform the U. S. Immigration Inspector on arrival at New York of their intention to leave the U. S. within sixty days (the time prescribed by U. S. Law) and obtain from him Transit Certificate Form 514.

It is also necessary for Transit Certificate Form 514 to be handed to the Transportation Company, when complete, in time to allow same to be placed before the Immigration Authorities in Washington within 120 days of Passenger's arrival in the United States. Unless this regulation is complied with, the Tax cannot be recovered.

Claims and Complaints - Passengers' criticism and suggestions relative to the services on board receive the most particular attention of the Company. Passengers are requested to address themselves in this connection either to the Captain or to the Direction, at the "Italia" Company's Headquarters, Piazza De-Ferrari, Genoa.

Source: SS Rex Passenger List - 6 October 1939

 

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In 1933 the Blue Ribbon, for the first time in history, went to a ship that was a product of Italian shipbuilding. The Italian government subsidized the construction of the great liner Rex.

This colossal ship commenced her maiden voyage bound for New York from the Italian port of Genoa on September 27, 1932. At a later date, she made a run from Gibraltar to Ambrose Light in 4 days, 13 hours, and 58 minutes covering a distance of 3,181 nautical miles and averaging 28.92 knots.

The Rex had accommodations for 2,024 passengers, and her crew numbered 810 members. Steam turbines of 120,000 s.h.p propelled her. Her foremost funnel was 51 feet high from deck level, and from her keel to the navigating bridge, the height was 120 feet.

While the Rex was still in the process of construction, an amalgamation of the three crucial Italian steamship lines took place under the direction of the Mussolini government. Lines affected by the merger were the Lloyd Sabaudo, the Cosulich, and the Navigazione Generale Italiana lines.

Thus when the Rex entered the Atlantic passenger trade, she discovered that her running mate was the equally newly built Conle di Savoia, a steamship from the yards of Cantieri Riuniti Dell Adriatico at Trieste, for the Lloyd Sabaudo account.

Together these two excellent and fast liners provided a luxurious service between the United States and the Mediterranean ports.

Eugene W. Smith, "The Italian Bid for Atlantic Supremacy, in Trans-Atlantic Passenger Ships Past and Present, Boston: George H. Dean Company, 1947: pp. 28-29.

 

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